Now Playing

Today - Saturday August 2, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

Maleficent 3-D

2014, USA/UK, 97 MINS, PG

Dir: Robert Stromberg
Starring: Angelina Jolie, Elle Fanning, Sharlto Copley

No stranger to larger-than-life characters, Angelina Jolie doesn’t chew the estimable scenery in Maleficent — she infuses it, wielding a magnetic and effortless power as the magnificently malevolent fairy who places a curse on a newborn princess. Her iconic face subtly altered with prosthetics, she’s the heart and soul (Maleficent has both, it turns out) of Disney’s revisionist, live-action look at its most popular cartoon villain, the self-described Mistress of All Evil from 1959’s Sleeping Beauty. A few bumpy patches notwithstanding, the new feature is an exquisitely designed, emotionally absorbing work of dark enchantment.  The Hollywood Reporter, Sheri Linden

4:00pm

Begin Again

2014, USA, 104 MINS, 14A

Dir: John Carney
Starring: Keira Knightley, Mark Ruffalo, Adam Levine, James Corden

The new film from Irish director John Carney, writer and director of the indie hit Once, is another movie about music — listening to it, making it, pouring your heart and soul into it. It’s about how a shared love of creating or even just listening to a song can bring people together in a meaningful way

Part fairy tale, part character study, Begin Again stars Keira Knightley as Gretta, a songwriter dumped by her callous pop star boyfriend (Adam Levine) after he has hit the big time and cheated on her. Shattered, Gretta is poised to head home to England but instead is dragged out to open mic night, where a cheery busker friend cajoles her onto the stage. The chatter in the bar rises. She finishes the song gamely, sure nobody’s really paying attention.

But someone is paying attention: flailing music industry executive Dan (Mark Ruffalo at his rumpled, dissolute best), who just got kicked out of his own company. He’s slumped at the bar but galvanized by the opening notes of Gretta’s song. Dan formed his own indie music label back in the day, but in the wake of personal disaster he has abandoned his first passion for the swampy embrace of booze, to the consternation of his partner (Mos Def) and his estranged wife (Catherine Keener). Hell, Dan doesn’t even know the age of his teenage daughter (Hailee Steinfeld, True Grit). But he does know a good song when he hears it.  Miami Herald, Connie Ogle 

.

7:00pm

3D Screening

Maleficent 3-D

2014, USA/UK, 97 MINS, PG

Dir: Robert Stromberg
Starring: Angelina Jolie, Elle Fanning, Sharlto Copley

No stranger to larger-than-life characters, Angelina Jolie doesn’t chew the estimable scenery in Maleficent — she infuses it, wielding a magnetic and effortless power as the magnificently malevolent fairy who places a curse on a newborn princess. Her iconic face subtly altered with prosthetics, she’s the heart and soul (Maleficent has both, it turns out) of Disney’s revisionist, live-action look at its most popular cartoon villain, the self-described Mistress of All Evil from 1959’s Sleeping Beauty. A few bumpy patches notwithstanding, the new feature is an exquisitely designed, emotionally absorbing work of dark enchantment.  The Hollywood Reporter, Sheri Linden

9:00pm

Begin Again

2014, USA, 104 MINS, 14A

Dir: John Carney
Starring: Keira Knightley, Mark Ruffalo, Adam Levine, James Corden

The new film from Irish director John Carney, writer and director of the indie hit Once, is another movie about music — listening to it, making it, pouring your heart and soul into it. It’s about how a shared love of creating or even just listening to a song can bring people together in a meaningful way

Part fairy tale, part character study, Begin Again stars Keira Knightley as Gretta, a songwriter dumped by her callous pop star boyfriend (Adam Levine) after he has hit the big time and cheated on her. Shattered, Gretta is poised to head home to England but instead is dragged out to open mic night, where a cheery busker friend cajoles her onto the stage. The chatter in the bar rises. She finishes the song gamely, sure nobody’s really paying attention.

But someone is paying attention: flailing music industry executive Dan (Mark Ruffalo at his rumpled, dissolute best), who just got kicked out of his own company. He’s slumped at the bar but galvanized by the opening notes of Gretta’s song. Dan formed his own indie music label back in the day, but in the wake of personal disaster he has abandoned his first passion for the swampy embrace of booze, to the consternation of his partner (Mos Def) and his estranged wife (Catherine Keener). Hell, Dan doesn’t even know the age of his teenage daughter (Hailee Steinfeld, True Grit). But he does know a good song when he hears it.  Miami Herald, Connie Ogle 

.

Sunday August 3, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

Maleficent 3-D

2014, USA/UK, 97 MINS, PG

Dir: Robert Stromberg
Starring: Angelina Jolie, Elle Fanning, Sharlto Copley

No stranger to larger-than-life characters, Angelina Jolie doesn’t chew the estimable scenery in Maleficent — she infuses it, wielding a magnetic and effortless power as the magnificently malevolent fairy who places a curse on a newborn princess. Her iconic face subtly altered with prosthetics, she’s the heart and soul (Maleficent has both, it turns out) of Disney’s revisionist, live-action look at its most popular cartoon villain, the self-described Mistress of All Evil from 1959’s Sleeping Beauty. A few bumpy patches notwithstanding, the new feature is an exquisitely designed, emotionally absorbing work of dark enchantment.  The Hollywood Reporter, Sheri Linden

4:00pm

Begin Again

2014, USA, 104 MINS, 14A

Dir: John Carney
Starring: Keira Knightley, Mark Ruffalo, Adam Levine, James Corden

The new film from Irish director John Carney, writer and director of the indie hit Once, is another movie about music — listening to it, making it, pouring your heart and soul into it. It’s about how a shared love of creating or even just listening to a song can bring people together in a meaningful way

Part fairy tale, part character study, Begin Again stars Keira Knightley as Gretta, a songwriter dumped by her callous pop star boyfriend (Adam Levine) after he has hit the big time and cheated on her. Shattered, Gretta is poised to head home to England but instead is dragged out to open mic night, where a cheery busker friend cajoles her onto the stage. The chatter in the bar rises. She finishes the song gamely, sure nobody’s really paying attention.

But someone is paying attention: flailing music industry executive Dan (Mark Ruffalo at his rumpled, dissolute best), who just got kicked out of his own company. He’s slumped at the bar but galvanized by the opening notes of Gretta’s song. Dan formed his own indie music label back in the day, but in the wake of personal disaster he has abandoned his first passion for the swampy embrace of booze, to the consternation of his partner (Mos Def) and his estranged wife (Catherine Keener). Hell, Dan doesn’t even know the age of his teenage daughter (Hailee Steinfeld, True Grit). But he does know a good song when he hears it.  Miami Herald, Connie Ogle 

.

7:00pm

3D Screening

Maleficent 3-D

2014, USA/UK, 97 MINS, PG

Dir: Robert Stromberg
Starring: Angelina Jolie, Elle Fanning, Sharlto Copley

No stranger to larger-than-life characters, Angelina Jolie doesn’t chew the estimable scenery in Maleficent — she infuses it, wielding a magnetic and effortless power as the magnificently malevolent fairy who places a curse on a newborn princess. Her iconic face subtly altered with prosthetics, she’s the heart and soul (Maleficent has both, it turns out) of Disney’s revisionist, live-action look at its most popular cartoon villain, the self-described Mistress of All Evil from 1959’s Sleeping Beauty. A few bumpy patches notwithstanding, the new feature is an exquisitely designed, emotionally absorbing work of dark enchantment.  The Hollywood Reporter, Sheri Linden

9:00pm

Begin Again

2014, USA, 104 MINS, 14A

Dir: John Carney
Starring: Keira Knightley, Mark Ruffalo, Adam Levine, James Corden

The new film from Irish director John Carney, writer and director of the indie hit Once, is another movie about music — listening to it, making it, pouring your heart and soul into it. It’s about how a shared love of creating or even just listening to a song can bring people together in a meaningful way

Part fairy tale, part character study, Begin Again stars Keira Knightley as Gretta, a songwriter dumped by her callous pop star boyfriend (Adam Levine) after he has hit the big time and cheated on her. Shattered, Gretta is poised to head home to England but instead is dragged out to open mic night, where a cheery busker friend cajoles her onto the stage. The chatter in the bar rises. She finishes the song gamely, sure nobody’s really paying attention.

But someone is paying attention: flailing music industry executive Dan (Mark Ruffalo at his rumpled, dissolute best), who just got kicked out of his own company. He’s slumped at the bar but galvanized by the opening notes of Gretta’s song. Dan formed his own indie music label back in the day, but in the wake of personal disaster he has abandoned his first passion for the swampy embrace of booze, to the consternation of his partner (Mos Def) and his estranged wife (Catherine Keener). Hell, Dan doesn’t even know the age of his teenage daughter (Hailee Steinfeld, True Grit). But he does know a good song when he hears it.  Miami Herald, Connie Ogle 

.

Monday August 4, 2014

2:00pm

Begin Again

2014, USA, 104 MINS, 14A

Dir: John Carney
Starring: Keira Knightley, Mark Ruffalo, Adam Levine, James Corden

The new film from Irish director John Carney, writer and director of the indie hit Once, is another movie about music — listening to it, making it, pouring your heart and soul into it. It’s about how a shared love of creating or even just listening to a song can bring people together in a meaningful way

Part fairy tale, part character study, Begin Again stars Keira Knightley as Gretta, a songwriter dumped by her callous pop star boyfriend (Adam Levine) after he has hit the big time and cheated on her. Shattered, Gretta is poised to head home to England but instead is dragged out to open mic night, where a cheery busker friend cajoles her onto the stage. The chatter in the bar rises. She finishes the song gamely, sure nobody’s really paying attention.

But someone is paying attention: flailing music industry executive Dan (Mark Ruffalo at his rumpled, dissolute best), who just got kicked out of his own company. He’s slumped at the bar but galvanized by the opening notes of Gretta’s song. Dan formed his own indie music label back in the day, but in the wake of personal disaster he has abandoned his first passion for the swampy embrace of booze, to the consternation of his partner (Mos Def) and his estranged wife (Catherine Keener). Hell, Dan doesn’t even know the age of his teenage daughter (Hailee Steinfeld, True Grit). But he does know a good song when he hears it.  Miami Herald, Connie Ogle 

.

4:15pm

3D Screening

Maleficent 3-D

2014, USA/UK, 97 MINS, PG

Dir: Robert Stromberg
Starring: Angelina Jolie, Elle Fanning, Sharlto Copley

No stranger to larger-than-life characters, Angelina Jolie doesn’t chew the estimable scenery in Maleficent — she infuses it, wielding a magnetic and effortless power as the magnificently malevolent fairy who places a curse on a newborn princess. Her iconic face subtly altered with prosthetics, she’s the heart and soul (Maleficent has both, it turns out) of Disney’s revisionist, live-action look at its most popular cartoon villain, the self-described Mistress of All Evil from 1959’s Sleeping Beauty. A few bumpy patches notwithstanding, the new feature is an exquisitely designed, emotionally absorbing work of dark enchantment.  The Hollywood Reporter, Sheri Linden

7:00pm

3D Screening

Maleficent 3-D

2014, USA/UK, 97 MINS, PG

Dir: Robert Stromberg
Starring: Angelina Jolie, Elle Fanning, Sharlto Copley

No stranger to larger-than-life characters, Angelina Jolie doesn’t chew the estimable scenery in Maleficent — she infuses it, wielding a magnetic and effortless power as the magnificently malevolent fairy who places a curse on a newborn princess. Her iconic face subtly altered with prosthetics, she’s the heart and soul (Maleficent has both, it turns out) of Disney’s revisionist, live-action look at its most popular cartoon villain, the self-described Mistress of All Evil from 1959’s Sleeping Beauty. A few bumpy patches notwithstanding, the new feature is an exquisitely designed, emotionally absorbing work of dark enchantment.  The Hollywood Reporter, Sheri Linden

9:00pm

Begin Again

2014, USA, 104 MINS, 14A

Dir: John Carney
Starring: Keira Knightley, Mark Ruffalo, Adam Levine, James Corden

The new film from Irish director John Carney, writer and director of the indie hit Once, is another movie about music — listening to it, making it, pouring your heart and soul into it. It’s about how a shared love of creating or even just listening to a song can bring people together in a meaningful way

Part fairy tale, part character study, Begin Again stars Keira Knightley as Gretta, a songwriter dumped by her callous pop star boyfriend (Adam Levine) after he has hit the big time and cheated on her. Shattered, Gretta is poised to head home to England but instead is dragged out to open mic night, where a cheery busker friend cajoles her onto the stage. The chatter in the bar rises. She finishes the song gamely, sure nobody’s really paying attention.

But someone is paying attention: flailing music industry executive Dan (Mark Ruffalo at his rumpled, dissolute best), who just got kicked out of his own company. He’s slumped at the bar but galvanized by the opening notes of Gretta’s song. Dan formed his own indie music label back in the day, but in the wake of personal disaster he has abandoned his first passion for the swampy embrace of booze, to the consternation of his partner (Mos Def) and his estranged wife (Catherine Keener). Hell, Dan doesn’t even know the age of his teenage daughter (Hailee Steinfeld, True Grit). But he does know a good song when he hears it.  Miami Herald, Connie Ogle 

.

Tuesday August 5, 2014

7:00pm

Begin Again

2014, USA, 104 MINS, 14A

Dir: John Carney
Starring: Keira Knightley, Mark Ruffalo, Adam Levine, James Corden

The new film from Irish director John Carney, writer and director of the indie hit Once, is another movie about music — listening to it, making it, pouring your heart and soul into it. It’s about how a shared love of creating or even just listening to a song can bring people together in a meaningful way

Part fairy tale, part character study, Begin Again stars Keira Knightley as Gretta, a songwriter dumped by her callous pop star boyfriend (Adam Levine) after he has hit the big time and cheated on her. Shattered, Gretta is poised to head home to England but instead is dragged out to open mic night, where a cheery busker friend cajoles her onto the stage. The chatter in the bar rises. She finishes the song gamely, sure nobody’s really paying attention.

But someone is paying attention: flailing music industry executive Dan (Mark Ruffalo at his rumpled, dissolute best), who just got kicked out of his own company. He’s slumped at the bar but galvanized by the opening notes of Gretta’s song. Dan formed his own indie music label back in the day, but in the wake of personal disaster he has abandoned his first passion for the swampy embrace of booze, to the consternation of his partner (Mos Def) and his estranged wife (Catherine Keener). Hell, Dan doesn’t even know the age of his teenage daughter (Hailee Steinfeld, True Grit). But he does know a good song when he hears it.  Miami Herald, Connie Ogle 

.

9:15pm

3D Screening

Maleficent 3-D

2014, USA/UK, 97 MINS, PG

Dir: Robert Stromberg
Starring: Angelina Jolie, Elle Fanning, Sharlto Copley

No stranger to larger-than-life characters, Angelina Jolie doesn’t chew the estimable scenery in Maleficent — she infuses it, wielding a magnetic and effortless power as the magnificently malevolent fairy who places a curse on a newborn princess. Her iconic face subtly altered with prosthetics, she’s the heart and soul (Maleficent has both, it turns out) of Disney’s revisionist, live-action look at its most popular cartoon villain, the self-described Mistress of All Evil from 1959’s Sleeping Beauty. A few bumpy patches notwithstanding, the new feature is an exquisitely designed, emotionally absorbing work of dark enchantment.  The Hollywood Reporter, Sheri Linden

Wednesday August 6, 2014

7:00pm

Begin Again

2014, USA, 104 MINS, 14A

Dir: John Carney
Starring: Keira Knightley, Mark Ruffalo, Adam Levine, James Corden

The new film from Irish director John Carney, writer and director of the indie hit Once, is another movie about music — listening to it, making it, pouring your heart and soul into it. It’s about how a shared love of creating or even just listening to a song can bring people together in a meaningful way

Part fairy tale, part character study, Begin Again stars Keira Knightley as Gretta, a songwriter dumped by her callous pop star boyfriend (Adam Levine) after he has hit the big time and cheated on her. Shattered, Gretta is poised to head home to England but instead is dragged out to open mic night, where a cheery busker friend cajoles her onto the stage. The chatter in the bar rises. She finishes the song gamely, sure nobody’s really paying attention.

But someone is paying attention: flailing music industry executive Dan (Mark Ruffalo at his rumpled, dissolute best), who just got kicked out of his own company. He’s slumped at the bar but galvanized by the opening notes of Gretta’s song. Dan formed his own indie music label back in the day, but in the wake of personal disaster he has abandoned his first passion for the swampy embrace of booze, to the consternation of his partner (Mos Def) and his estranged wife (Catherine Keener). Hell, Dan doesn’t even know the age of his teenage daughter (Hailee Steinfeld, True Grit). But he does know a good song when he hears it.  Miami Herald, Connie Ogle 

.

9:15pm

The Lunchbox

2014, India, France, Germany, USA, 105 MINS, G

Dir: Ritesh Batra
Starring: Irrfan Khan, Nimrat Kaur, Nawazuddin Siddiqui

Charming hearts and making hungry stomachs growl, Ritesh Batra's bittersweet romance delights. Set amid Mumbai's courier system of lunch delivery, a mistaken dropoff creates pen pals and perhaps more of an unfulfilled housewife and a bored bureaucrat.

Ila is devoted to a husband who may be cheating, hoping to regain favor by preparing him lunches of his favorite recipes. The deliveries end up with an aging, melancholy soul named Saajan, played by Irrfan Khan (The Life of Pi), whose complimentary replies flatter Ila as her husband doesn't. Saajan is smitten, first with the food — truly mouth-watering to see — and then by Ila's notes accompanying each meal. Two people trapped in dead-end existences develop a pen pal friendship with the faint chance of escaping with each other. Steve Persall, Tampa Bay Times



Thursday August 7, 2014

7:00pm

The Lunchbox

2014, India, France, Germany, USA, 105 MINS, G

Dir: Ritesh Batra
Starring: Irrfan Khan, Nimrat Kaur, Nawazuddin Siddiqui

Charming hearts and making hungry stomachs growl, Ritesh Batra's bittersweet romance delights. Set amid Mumbai's courier system of lunch delivery, a mistaken dropoff creates pen pals and perhaps more of an unfulfilled housewife and a bored bureaucrat.

Ila is devoted to a husband who may be cheating, hoping to regain favor by preparing him lunches of his favorite recipes. The deliveries end up with an aging, melancholy soul named Saajan, played by Irrfan Khan (The Life of Pi), whose complimentary replies flatter Ila as her husband doesn't. Saajan is smitten, first with the food — truly mouth-watering to see — and then by Ila's notes accompanying each meal. Two people trapped in dead-end existences develop a pen pal friendship with the faint chance of escaping with each other. Steve Persall, Tampa Bay Times



9:15pm

Begin Again

2014, USA, 104 MINS, 14A

Dir: John Carney
Starring: Keira Knightley, Mark Ruffalo, Adam Levine, James Corden

The new film from Irish director John Carney, writer and director of the indie hit Once, is another movie about music — listening to it, making it, pouring your heart and soul into it. It’s about how a shared love of creating or even just listening to a song can bring people together in a meaningful way

Part fairy tale, part character study, Begin Again stars Keira Knightley as Gretta, a songwriter dumped by her callous pop star boyfriend (Adam Levine) after he has hit the big time and cheated on her. Shattered, Gretta is poised to head home to England but instead is dragged out to open mic night, where a cheery busker friend cajoles her onto the stage. The chatter in the bar rises. She finishes the song gamely, sure nobody’s really paying attention.

But someone is paying attention: flailing music industry executive Dan (Mark Ruffalo at his rumpled, dissolute best), who just got kicked out of his own company. He’s slumped at the bar but galvanized by the opening notes of Gretta’s song. Dan formed his own indie music label back in the day, but in the wake of personal disaster he has abandoned his first passion for the swampy embrace of booze, to the consternation of his partner (Mos Def) and his estranged wife (Catherine Keener). Hell, Dan doesn’t even know the age of his teenage daughter (Hailee Steinfeld, True Grit). But he does know a good song when he hears it.  Miami Herald, Connie Ogle 

.

Friday August 8, 2014

7:00pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

9:15pm

3D Screening

Edge of Tomorrow 3-D

2014, USA, 113 MINS, PG

Dir: Doug Liman
Starring: Tom Cruise, Emily Blunt

"Edge of Tomorrow" is less of a time travel movie than an experience movie; that statement might not make sense now, but it probably will after you've seen it. Based on Hiroshi Sikurazaka's novel "All You Need is Kill", it's a true science fiction film, highly conceptual, set during the aftermath of an alien invasion. The fierce, octopod-looking beasties known as Mimics are controlled hive-mind style by a creature that seems able to peer through time, or rupture it, or something. When the tale begins, we don't have exact answers about the enemy's powers (that's for our intrepid heroes to find out), but we have a solid hunch that it can see possible futures through the eyes of specific humans, then treat them as, essentially, video game characters, following their progress through the nasty "adventure" of the war, and making note of their tactical maneuvers, the better to ensure our collective extermination. 

Cruise is hugely appealing here, not just in the early scenes opposite Gleeson in which he's inTony Curtis mode—he's always fantastic playing a smooth-talking manipulator who's sweating on the inside—but later, where he exhibits the sort of rock-solid super-competence and unforced decency that Randolph Scott brought to Budd Boetticher's westerns. He was always likable, sometimes perfect in the right role, but age has deepened him by bringing out his vulnerability. Cruise deserves some sort of acting award for the array of yelps and gasps he summons as he's killed by a Mimic or shot in the head by Blunt and then rebooted into another version of the story.

The movie has an organic intelligence and a sense that it, too, exists outside of linear time. It seems to be creating itself as you watch it.  

Matt Zoller Seitz, rogerebert.com


Saturday August 9, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

How To Train Your Dragon 2 3-D

2014, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: Dean DeBlois
Starring: Jay Baruchel, Cate Blanchett, Gerard Butler

When last seen on the big screen four years ago, Hiccup had bonded with an injured dragon he named Toothless, proved that dragons could be man's best friends, and won his father's respect in the process. Now, barely out of his teens (though still voiced with wry charm by Jay Baruchel), he's faced with grave responsibilities—his father wants him to lead the tribe—and beset by self-doubt: "I know I'm not my father, and I never met my mother, so what does that make me?"

What that makes him, in the context of impending events, is a phenomenally confident self-doubter. A very bad guy named Drago, Hiccup learns, is threatening the tribe with a dragon army. The hero's father, Stoick the Vast (Gerard Butler), responds to the threat by shutting the city's gates and preparing for war. Hiccup, however, climbs aboard Toothless and seeks Drago out, hoping to show the mad tyrant the error of his ways.

Gleeful and smart, funny and serious, this sequel surpasses the endearing original with gorgeous animation—a dragon Eden, a dragon scourge, an infinitude of dragons—and one stirring human encounter after another.  The Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern

4:00pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

7:00pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

9:15pm

3D Screening

Edge of Tomorrow 3-D

2014, USA, 113 MINS, PG

Dir: Doug Liman
Starring: Tom Cruise, Emily Blunt

"Edge of Tomorrow" is less of a time travel movie than an experience movie; that statement might not make sense now, but it probably will after you've seen it. Based on Hiroshi Sikurazaka's novel "All You Need is Kill", it's a true science fiction film, highly conceptual, set during the aftermath of an alien invasion. The fierce, octopod-looking beasties known as Mimics are controlled hive-mind style by a creature that seems able to peer through time, or rupture it, or something. When the tale begins, we don't have exact answers about the enemy's powers (that's for our intrepid heroes to find out), but we have a solid hunch that it can see possible futures through the eyes of specific humans, then treat them as, essentially, video game characters, following their progress through the nasty "adventure" of the war, and making note of their tactical maneuvers, the better to ensure our collective extermination. 

Cruise is hugely appealing here, not just in the early scenes opposite Gleeson in which he's inTony Curtis mode—he's always fantastic playing a smooth-talking manipulator who's sweating on the inside—but later, where he exhibits the sort of rock-solid super-competence and unforced decency that Randolph Scott brought to Budd Boetticher's westerns. He was always likable, sometimes perfect in the right role, but age has deepened him by bringing out his vulnerability. Cruise deserves some sort of acting award for the array of yelps and gasps he summons as he's killed by a Mimic or shot in the head by Blunt and then rebooted into another version of the story.

The movie has an organic intelligence and a sense that it, too, exists outside of linear time. It seems to be creating itself as you watch it.  

Matt Zoller Seitz, rogerebert.com


Sunday August 10, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

How To Train Your Dragon 2 3-D

2014, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: Dean DeBlois
Starring: Jay Baruchel, Cate Blanchett, Gerard Butler

When last seen on the big screen four years ago, Hiccup had bonded with an injured dragon he named Toothless, proved that dragons could be man's best friends, and won his father's respect in the process. Now, barely out of his teens (though still voiced with wry charm by Jay Baruchel), he's faced with grave responsibilities—his father wants him to lead the tribe—and beset by self-doubt: "I know I'm not my father, and I never met my mother, so what does that make me?"

What that makes him, in the context of impending events, is a phenomenally confident self-doubter. A very bad guy named Drago, Hiccup learns, is threatening the tribe with a dragon army. The hero's father, Stoick the Vast (Gerard Butler), responds to the threat by shutting the city's gates and preparing for war. Hiccup, however, climbs aboard Toothless and seeks Drago out, hoping to show the mad tyrant the error of his ways.

Gleeful and smart, funny and serious, this sequel surpasses the endearing original with gorgeous animation—a dragon Eden, a dragon scourge, an infinitude of dragons—and one stirring human encounter after another.  The Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern

4:00pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

7:00pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

9:15pm

3D Screening

Edge of Tomorrow 3-D

2014, USA, 113 MINS, PG

Dir: Doug Liman
Starring: Tom Cruise, Emily Blunt

"Edge of Tomorrow" is less of a time travel movie than an experience movie; that statement might not make sense now, but it probably will after you've seen it. Based on Hiroshi Sikurazaka's novel "All You Need is Kill", it's a true science fiction film, highly conceptual, set during the aftermath of an alien invasion. The fierce, octopod-looking beasties known as Mimics are controlled hive-mind style by a creature that seems able to peer through time, or rupture it, or something. When the tale begins, we don't have exact answers about the enemy's powers (that's for our intrepid heroes to find out), but we have a solid hunch that it can see possible futures through the eyes of specific humans, then treat them as, essentially, video game characters, following their progress through the nasty "adventure" of the war, and making note of their tactical maneuvers, the better to ensure our collective extermination. 

Cruise is hugely appealing here, not just in the early scenes opposite Gleeson in which he's inTony Curtis mode—he's always fantastic playing a smooth-talking manipulator who's sweating on the inside—but later, where he exhibits the sort of rock-solid super-competence and unforced decency that Randolph Scott brought to Budd Boetticher's westerns. He was always likable, sometimes perfect in the right role, but age has deepened him by bringing out his vulnerability. Cruise deserves some sort of acting award for the array of yelps and gasps he summons as he's killed by a Mimic or shot in the head by Blunt and then rebooted into another version of the story.

The movie has an organic intelligence and a sense that it, too, exists outside of linear time. It seems to be creating itself as you watch it.  

Matt Zoller Seitz, rogerebert.com


Monday August 11, 2014

7:00pm

3D Screening

Edge of Tomorrow 3-D

2014, USA, 113 MINS, PG

Dir: Doug Liman
Starring: Tom Cruise, Emily Blunt

"Edge of Tomorrow" is less of a time travel movie than an experience movie; that statement might not make sense now, but it probably will after you've seen it. Based on Hiroshi Sikurazaka's novel "All You Need is Kill", it's a true science fiction film, highly conceptual, set during the aftermath of an alien invasion. The fierce, octopod-looking beasties known as Mimics are controlled hive-mind style by a creature that seems able to peer through time, or rupture it, or something. When the tale begins, we don't have exact answers about the enemy's powers (that's for our intrepid heroes to find out), but we have a solid hunch that it can see possible futures through the eyes of specific humans, then treat them as, essentially, video game characters, following their progress through the nasty "adventure" of the war, and making note of their tactical maneuvers, the better to ensure our collective extermination. 

Cruise is hugely appealing here, not just in the early scenes opposite Gleeson in which he's inTony Curtis mode—he's always fantastic playing a smooth-talking manipulator who's sweating on the inside—but later, where he exhibits the sort of rock-solid super-competence and unforced decency that Randolph Scott brought to Budd Boetticher's westerns. He was always likable, sometimes perfect in the right role, but age has deepened him by bringing out his vulnerability. Cruise deserves some sort of acting award for the array of yelps and gasps he summons as he's killed by a Mimic or shot in the head by Blunt and then rebooted into another version of the story.

The movie has an organic intelligence and a sense that it, too, exists outside of linear time. It seems to be creating itself as you watch it.  

Matt Zoller Seitz, rogerebert.com


9:15pm

Words and Pictures

2013, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Fred Schepisi
Starring: Juliette Binoche, Clive Owen

Jack Marcus (Clive Owen) and Dina Delsanto (Juliette Binoche), who teach at the fictional Croyden prep school. Jack, a garrulous, combative and alcoholic poet who has lost his creative mojo, is on the verge of being fired. He is an outspoken champion of the written word and is fearless about voicing a special loathing for social media’s reduction of literacy to tweets and text messages. His rants are witty and impassioned, and the examples he cites of world-changing literary passages convincingly bear out the truth of his conviction that much has been lost in the era of the instant message.

Dina, the school’s new art instructor, is a painter and hard-nosed aesthetician who has rheumatoid arthritis. Their verbal skirmishes, enlivened by an undertone of sexual attraction, are reminiscent of the battles fought between Norman Mailer and Germaine Greer in the 1970s. 

The screenplay’s strongest moments set off the kind of trains of thought that dedicated teachers hope to spur in their students. 

Stephen Holden, New York Times

Tuesday August 12, 2014

7:00pm

Words and Pictures

2013, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Fred Schepisi
Starring: Juliette Binoche, Clive Owen

Jack Marcus (Clive Owen) and Dina Delsanto (Juliette Binoche), who teach at the fictional Croyden prep school. Jack, a garrulous, combative and alcoholic poet who has lost his creative mojo, is on the verge of being fired. He is an outspoken champion of the written word and is fearless about voicing a special loathing for social media’s reduction of literacy to tweets and text messages. His rants are witty and impassioned, and the examples he cites of world-changing literary passages convincingly bear out the truth of his conviction that much has been lost in the era of the instant message.

Dina, the school’s new art instructor, is a painter and hard-nosed aesthetician who has rheumatoid arthritis. Their verbal skirmishes, enlivened by an undertone of sexual attraction, are reminiscent of the battles fought between Norman Mailer and Germaine Greer in the 1970s. 

The screenplay’s strongest moments set off the kind of trains of thought that dedicated teachers hope to spur in their students. 

Stephen Holden, New York Times

9:15pm

Railway Man

2014, Australia, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jonathan Teplitzky
Starring: Colin Firth, Nicole Kidman, Stellan Skarsgård

Wrenching, profound and beautifully made, The Railway Man is one of the stunning don’t-miss surprises of the still-young 2014, teaming two of the screen’s most popular stars, Colin Firth and Nicole Kidman, in a heartbreaking footnote to World War II that is certain to touch and humble all but the hardest and most jaded of hearts. A remarkable film in every way, it relates the true story of Eric Lomax, a British soldier captured by the Japanese in the fall of Singapore in 1942 and treated as slave labor in the construction of the notorious “death railway” from Thailand to Burma, who somehow miraculously survived to confront his torturer 40 years later. It’s an inspiring and unforgettable story about cruelty, endurance, courage and making peace with the past. 

Australian director Jonathan Teplitzky has adapted the traumatic events related in Mr. Lomax’s best-selling memoir and ushered them onto the screen with enough power and credibility to reduce viewers to tears and then bring them to a cheering standing ovation at last year’s Toronto International Film Festival.

 New York Observer  Rex Reed

Wednesday August 13, 2014

7:00pm

Railway Man

2014, Australia, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jonathan Teplitzky
Starring: Colin Firth, Nicole Kidman, Stellan Skarsgård

Wrenching, profound and beautifully made, The Railway Man is one of the stunning don’t-miss surprises of the still-young 2014, teaming two of the screen’s most popular stars, Colin Firth and Nicole Kidman, in a heartbreaking footnote to World War II that is certain to touch and humble all but the hardest and most jaded of hearts. A remarkable film in every way, it relates the true story of Eric Lomax, a British soldier captured by the Japanese in the fall of Singapore in 1942 and treated as slave labor in the construction of the notorious “death railway” from Thailand to Burma, who somehow miraculously survived to confront his torturer 40 years later. It’s an inspiring and unforgettable story about cruelty, endurance, courage and making peace with the past. 

Australian director Jonathan Teplitzky has adapted the traumatic events related in Mr. Lomax’s best-selling memoir and ushered them onto the screen with enough power and credibility to reduce viewers to tears and then bring them to a cheering standing ovation at last year’s Toronto International Film Festival.

 New York Observer  Rex Reed

9:15pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

Thursday August 14, 2014

7:00pm

DogStarz with Judy Croon

0 MINS, G

Dogstarz Comedy Fundraising Gala- Proceeds to benefit The Toronto Humane Society. Hosted By Judy Croon featuring some of Toronto's finest stand up comics. Drinks and prizes. The event runs 7PM-9PM with doors opening at 6:30PM. Tickets are $20 (25 at the door) available at Dogstarz.ca or e-mail sylviadogstarz@yahoo.ca

9:15pm

Railway Man

2014, Australia, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jonathan Teplitzky
Starring: Colin Firth, Nicole Kidman, Stellan Skarsgård

Wrenching, profound and beautifully made, The Railway Man is one of the stunning don’t-miss surprises of the still-young 2014, teaming two of the screen’s most popular stars, Colin Firth and Nicole Kidman, in a heartbreaking footnote to World War II that is certain to touch and humble all but the hardest and most jaded of hearts. A remarkable film in every way, it relates the true story of Eric Lomax, a British soldier captured by the Japanese in the fall of Singapore in 1942 and treated as slave labor in the construction of the notorious “death railway” from Thailand to Burma, who somehow miraculously survived to confront his torturer 40 years later. It’s an inspiring and unforgettable story about cruelty, endurance, courage and making peace with the past. 

Australian director Jonathan Teplitzky has adapted the traumatic events related in Mr. Lomax’s best-selling memoir and ushered them onto the screen with enough power and credibility to reduce viewers to tears and then bring them to a cheering standing ovation at last year’s Toronto International Film Festival.

 New York Observer  Rex Reed

Friday August 15, 2014

7:00pm

The Grand Seduction

2014, Canada, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Don McKellar
Starring: Taylor Kitsch, Brendan Gleeson, Liane Balaban

Tickle Head, a down-on-its-luck fishing village in Canada, wants to lure a recycling plant so everyone can get off welfare, but the company requires that the town have a doctor, which it doesn’t. And so the residents, led by Murray (Brendan Gleeson, the perfect anchor for the proceedings), set about trying to persuade a visiting physician (Taylor Kitsch) to settle in Tickle Head. This involves not only making the town look more appealing than it is but also making it seem to embody all of the doctor’s interests, which are gleaned by eavesdropping on his phone calls. Among other things, residents try to pass themselves off as aficionados of cricket, and the sport may never recover.

The movie, a remake of a 2003 French-language film, has an eclectic supporting cast that includes Mark Critch, Gordon Pinsent and Liane Balaban. Under Don McKellar’s direction, they might have you investigating the possibility of relocating to Tickle Head yourself. The New York Times, Neil Genzlinger



9:15pm

3D Screening

X-Men: Days of Future Past 3-D

2014, USA, 131 MINS, PG

Dir: Bryan Singer
Starring: Jennifer Lawrence, Hugh Jackman

 

Loosely adapted from the classic Chris Claremont comic storyline of the same name, X-Men: Days of Future Past sees the big screen’s original X-Men (Wolverine, Professor X, Storm, Kitty Pryde, Iceman, Colossus, and even their one-time enemy Magneto) and their latest members (Bishop, Warpath, Sunspot, and Blink) living in a dystopian future where the massive mutant-hunting Sentinels have practically exterminated mutants, incarcerating the surviving ones in concentration camps with the humans who helped them. The only way for the X-Men to survive is to send one of their own back in time telepathically in order to stop the assassination that paved the way for the mutant holocaust. The film's action sequences are well-done and engaging, from its opening scene of the future X-Men falling to the Sentinels to the Paris standoff through to the climactic battle in Washington D.C. 

Days of Future Past is the most ambitious entry in the franchise and also the most rewarding, allowing fans to see the casts of both the original trilogy and First Class join forces in one action-packed, high-stakes, and surprisingly witty adventure film. 

Jim Vejvoda, IGN.com



Saturday August 16, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

X-Men: Days of Future Past 3-D

2014, USA, 131 MINS, PG

Dir: Bryan Singer
Starring: Jennifer Lawrence, Hugh Jackman

 

Loosely adapted from the classic Chris Claremont comic storyline of the same name, X-Men: Days of Future Past sees the big screen’s original X-Men (Wolverine, Professor X, Storm, Kitty Pryde, Iceman, Colossus, and even their one-time enemy Magneto) and their latest members (Bishop, Warpath, Sunspot, and Blink) living in a dystopian future where the massive mutant-hunting Sentinels have practically exterminated mutants, incarcerating the surviving ones in concentration camps with the humans who helped them. The only way for the X-Men to survive is to send one of their own back in time telepathically in order to stop the assassination that paved the way for the mutant holocaust. The film's action sequences are well-done and engaging, from its opening scene of the future X-Men falling to the Sentinels to the Paris standoff through to the climactic battle in Washington D.C. 

Days of Future Past is the most ambitious entry in the franchise and also the most rewarding, allowing fans to see the casts of both the original trilogy and First Class join forces in one action-packed, high-stakes, and surprisingly witty adventure film. 

Jim Vejvoda, IGN.com



4:30pm

The Grand Seduction

2014, Canada, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Don McKellar
Starring: Taylor Kitsch, Brendan Gleeson, Liane Balaban

Tickle Head, a down-on-its-luck fishing village in Canada, wants to lure a recycling plant so everyone can get off welfare, but the company requires that the town have a doctor, which it doesn’t. And so the residents, led by Murray (Brendan Gleeson, the perfect anchor for the proceedings), set about trying to persuade a visiting physician (Taylor Kitsch) to settle in Tickle Head. This involves not only making the town look more appealing than it is but also making it seem to embody all of the doctor’s interests, which are gleaned by eavesdropping on his phone calls. Among other things, residents try to pass themselves off as aficionados of cricket, and the sport may never recover.

The movie, a remake of a 2003 French-language film, has an eclectic supporting cast that includes Mark Critch, Gordon Pinsent and Liane Balaban. Under Don McKellar’s direction, they might have you investigating the possibility of relocating to Tickle Head yourself. The New York Times, Neil Genzlinger



7:00pm

The Grand Seduction

2014, Canada, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Don McKellar
Starring: Taylor Kitsch, Brendan Gleeson, Liane Balaban

Tickle Head, a down-on-its-luck fishing village in Canada, wants to lure a recycling plant so everyone can get off welfare, but the company requires that the town have a doctor, which it doesn’t. And so the residents, led by Murray (Brendan Gleeson, the perfect anchor for the proceedings), set about trying to persuade a visiting physician (Taylor Kitsch) to settle in Tickle Head. This involves not only making the town look more appealing than it is but also making it seem to embody all of the doctor’s interests, which are gleaned by eavesdropping on his phone calls. Among other things, residents try to pass themselves off as aficionados of cricket, and the sport may never recover.

The movie, a remake of a 2003 French-language film, has an eclectic supporting cast that includes Mark Critch, Gordon Pinsent and Liane Balaban. Under Don McKellar’s direction, they might have you investigating the possibility of relocating to Tickle Head yourself. The New York Times, Neil Genzlinger



9:15pm

3D Screening

X-Men: Days of Future Past 3-D

2014, USA, 131 MINS, PG

Dir: Bryan Singer
Starring: Jennifer Lawrence, Hugh Jackman

 

Loosely adapted from the classic Chris Claremont comic storyline of the same name, X-Men: Days of Future Past sees the big screen’s original X-Men (Wolverine, Professor X, Storm, Kitty Pryde, Iceman, Colossus, and even their one-time enemy Magneto) and their latest members (Bishop, Warpath, Sunspot, and Blink) living in a dystopian future where the massive mutant-hunting Sentinels have practically exterminated mutants, incarcerating the surviving ones in concentration camps with the humans who helped them. The only way for the X-Men to survive is to send one of their own back in time telepathically in order to stop the assassination that paved the way for the mutant holocaust. The film's action sequences are well-done and engaging, from its opening scene of the future X-Men falling to the Sentinels to the Paris standoff through to the climactic battle in Washington D.C. 

Days of Future Past is the most ambitious entry in the franchise and also the most rewarding, allowing fans to see the casts of both the original trilogy and First Class join forces in one action-packed, high-stakes, and surprisingly witty adventure film. 

Jim Vejvoda, IGN.com



Sunday August 17, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

X-Men: Days of Future Past 3-D

2014, USA, 131 MINS, PG

Dir: Bryan Singer
Starring: Jennifer Lawrence, Hugh Jackman

 

Loosely adapted from the classic Chris Claremont comic storyline of the same name, X-Men: Days of Future Past sees the big screen’s original X-Men (Wolverine, Professor X, Storm, Kitty Pryde, Iceman, Colossus, and even their one-time enemy Magneto) and their latest members (Bishop, Warpath, Sunspot, and Blink) living in a dystopian future where the massive mutant-hunting Sentinels have practically exterminated mutants, incarcerating the surviving ones in concentration camps with the humans who helped them. The only way for the X-Men to survive is to send one of their own back in time telepathically in order to stop the assassination that paved the way for the mutant holocaust. The film's action sequences are well-done and engaging, from its opening scene of the future X-Men falling to the Sentinels to the Paris standoff through to the climactic battle in Washington D.C. 

Days of Future Past is the most ambitious entry in the franchise and also the most rewarding, allowing fans to see the casts of both the original trilogy and First Class join forces in one action-packed, high-stakes, and surprisingly witty adventure film. 

Jim Vejvoda, IGN.com



4:30pm

The Grand Seduction

2014, Canada, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Don McKellar
Starring: Taylor Kitsch, Brendan Gleeson, Liane Balaban

Tickle Head, a down-on-its-luck fishing village in Canada, wants to lure a recycling plant so everyone can get off welfare, but the company requires that the town have a doctor, which it doesn’t. And so the residents, led by Murray (Brendan Gleeson, the perfect anchor for the proceedings), set about trying to persuade a visiting physician (Taylor Kitsch) to settle in Tickle Head. This involves not only making the town look more appealing than it is but also making it seem to embody all of the doctor’s interests, which are gleaned by eavesdropping on his phone calls. Among other things, residents try to pass themselves off as aficionados of cricket, and the sport may never recover.

The movie, a remake of a 2003 French-language film, has an eclectic supporting cast that includes Mark Critch, Gordon Pinsent and Liane Balaban. Under Don McKellar’s direction, they might have you investigating the possibility of relocating to Tickle Head yourself. The New York Times, Neil Genzlinger



7:00pm

The Grand Seduction

2014, Canada, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Don McKellar
Starring: Taylor Kitsch, Brendan Gleeson, Liane Balaban

Tickle Head, a down-on-its-luck fishing village in Canada, wants to lure a recycling plant so everyone can get off welfare, but the company requires that the town have a doctor, which it doesn’t. And so the residents, led by Murray (Brendan Gleeson, the perfect anchor for the proceedings), set about trying to persuade a visiting physician (Taylor Kitsch) to settle in Tickle Head. This involves not only making the town look more appealing than it is but also making it seem to embody all of the doctor’s interests, which are gleaned by eavesdropping on his phone calls. Among other things, residents try to pass themselves off as aficionados of cricket, and the sport may never recover.

The movie, a remake of a 2003 French-language film, has an eclectic supporting cast that includes Mark Critch, Gordon Pinsent and Liane Balaban. Under Don McKellar’s direction, they might have you investigating the possibility of relocating to Tickle Head yourself. The New York Times, Neil Genzlinger



9:15pm

3D Screening

X-Men: Days of Future Past 3-D

2014, USA, 131 MINS, PG

Dir: Bryan Singer
Starring: Jennifer Lawrence, Hugh Jackman

 

Loosely adapted from the classic Chris Claremont comic storyline of the same name, X-Men: Days of Future Past sees the big screen’s original X-Men (Wolverine, Professor X, Storm, Kitty Pryde, Iceman, Colossus, and even their one-time enemy Magneto) and their latest members (Bishop, Warpath, Sunspot, and Blink) living in a dystopian future where the massive mutant-hunting Sentinels have practically exterminated mutants, incarcerating the surviving ones in concentration camps with the humans who helped them. The only way for the X-Men to survive is to send one of their own back in time telepathically in order to stop the assassination that paved the way for the mutant holocaust. The film's action sequences are well-done and engaging, from its opening scene of the future X-Men falling to the Sentinels to the Paris standoff through to the climactic battle in Washington D.C. 

Days of Future Past is the most ambitious entry in the franchise and also the most rewarding, allowing fans to see the casts of both the original trilogy and First Class join forces in one action-packed, high-stakes, and surprisingly witty adventure film. 

Jim Vejvoda, IGN.com



Monday August 18, 2014

7:00pm

3D Screening

X-Men: Days of Future Past 3-D

2014, USA, 131 MINS, PG

Dir: Bryan Singer
Starring: Jennifer Lawrence, Hugh Jackman

 

Loosely adapted from the classic Chris Claremont comic storyline of the same name, X-Men: Days of Future Past sees the big screen’s original X-Men (Wolverine, Professor X, Storm, Kitty Pryde, Iceman, Colossus, and even their one-time enemy Magneto) and their latest members (Bishop, Warpath, Sunspot, and Blink) living in a dystopian future where the massive mutant-hunting Sentinels have practically exterminated mutants, incarcerating the surviving ones in concentration camps with the humans who helped them. The only way for the X-Men to survive is to send one of their own back in time telepathically in order to stop the assassination that paved the way for the mutant holocaust. The film's action sequences are well-done and engaging, from its opening scene of the future X-Men falling to the Sentinels to the Paris standoff through to the climactic battle in Washington D.C. 

Days of Future Past is the most ambitious entry in the franchise and also the most rewarding, allowing fans to see the casts of both the original trilogy and First Class join forces in one action-packed, high-stakes, and surprisingly witty adventure film. 

Jim Vejvoda, IGN.com



9:30pm

The Grand Seduction

2014, Canada, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Don McKellar
Starring: Taylor Kitsch, Brendan Gleeson, Liane Balaban

Tickle Head, a down-on-its-luck fishing village in Canada, wants to lure a recycling plant so everyone can get off welfare, but the company requires that the town have a doctor, which it doesn’t. And so the residents, led by Murray (Brendan Gleeson, the perfect anchor for the proceedings), set about trying to persuade a visiting physician (Taylor Kitsch) to settle in Tickle Head. This involves not only making the town look more appealing than it is but also making it seem to embody all of the doctor’s interests, which are gleaned by eavesdropping on his phone calls. Among other things, residents try to pass themselves off as aficionados of cricket, and the sport may never recover.

The movie, a remake of a 2003 French-language film, has an eclectic supporting cast that includes Mark Critch, Gordon Pinsent and Liane Balaban. Under Don McKellar’s direction, they might have you investigating the possibility of relocating to Tickle Head yourself. The New York Times, Neil Genzlinger



Tuesday August 19, 2014

7:00pm

Snowpiercer

2014, USA/France/South Korea/Czech Republic, 126 MINS, 14A

Dir: Joon-ho Bong
Starring: Chris Evans, Jamie Bell, Tilda Swinton, Ed Harris

A stunning, visionary example of dystopian science fiction cinema at its very best, South Korean director Bong Joon-ho's Snowpiercer (2013) - based in the French graphic novel - is a blockbuster of gargantuan proportions. Starring a cavalcade of well-known faces including Tilda Swinton, Chris Evans and Song Kang-ho, this futuristic allegory beautifully imbues radical social politics with a sharp and intuitive eye for style and action. Upending the social structure of society and transposing it horizontally, the upper-class has become first-class on the Rattling Ark - a gigantic speed train hurtling across a world pushed into a second ice-age due to the meddling of man.

If this colossal locomotive were to stop moving, the last remnants of humanity would freeze to death, making the train's perpetual-motion engine both the beating heart of humankind and an exceptionally prized asset. A literal microcosm of a contemporary neoliberal society, those at the front of the train rule over the rest, with the rich dictating to the complicit, who in turn oppress the poor and underprivileged. However, as history has continually taught us, this type of dictatorship is unsustainable and revolution an inevitability. We thus board the Rattling Ark just as the seeds of disquiet begin to blossom into battle, with Evans' Curtis at the forefront of the uprising. A magnificent tapestry of rich visuals, futurist whimsy and dark social satire, Bong's Snowpiercer certainly isn't your average sci-fi epic. CineVue, Patrick Gamble

9:20pm

The Grand Seduction

2014, Canada, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Don McKellar
Starring: Taylor Kitsch, Brendan Gleeson, Liane Balaban

Tickle Head, a down-on-its-luck fishing village in Canada, wants to lure a recycling plant so everyone can get off welfare, but the company requires that the town have a doctor, which it doesn’t. And so the residents, led by Murray (Brendan Gleeson, the perfect anchor for the proceedings), set about trying to persuade a visiting physician (Taylor Kitsch) to settle in Tickle Head. This involves not only making the town look more appealing than it is but also making it seem to embody all of the doctor’s interests, which are gleaned by eavesdropping on his phone calls. Among other things, residents try to pass themselves off as aficionados of cricket, and the sport may never recover.

The movie, a remake of a 2003 French-language film, has an eclectic supporting cast that includes Mark Critch, Gordon Pinsent and Liane Balaban. Under Don McKellar’s direction, they might have you investigating the possibility of relocating to Tickle Head yourself. The New York Times, Neil Genzlinger



Wednesday August 20, 2014

7:00pm

The Grand Seduction

2014, Canada, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Don McKellar
Starring: Taylor Kitsch, Brendan Gleeson, Liane Balaban

Tickle Head, a down-on-its-luck fishing village in Canada, wants to lure a recycling plant so everyone can get off welfare, but the company requires that the town have a doctor, which it doesn’t. And so the residents, led by Murray (Brendan Gleeson, the perfect anchor for the proceedings), set about trying to persuade a visiting physician (Taylor Kitsch) to settle in Tickle Head. This involves not only making the town look more appealing than it is but also making it seem to embody all of the doctor’s interests, which are gleaned by eavesdropping on his phone calls. Among other things, residents try to pass themselves off as aficionados of cricket, and the sport may never recover.

The movie, a remake of a 2003 French-language film, has an eclectic supporting cast that includes Mark Critch, Gordon Pinsent and Liane Balaban. Under Don McKellar’s direction, they might have you investigating the possibility of relocating to Tickle Head yourself. The New York Times, Neil Genzlinger



9:15pm

Snowpiercer

2014, USA/France/South Korea/Czech Republic, 126 MINS, 14A

Dir: Joon-ho Bong
Starring: Chris Evans, Jamie Bell, Tilda Swinton, Ed Harris

A stunning, visionary example of dystopian science fiction cinema at its very best, South Korean director Bong Joon-ho's Snowpiercer (2013) - based in the French graphic novel - is a blockbuster of gargantuan proportions. Starring a cavalcade of well-known faces including Tilda Swinton, Chris Evans and Song Kang-ho, this futuristic allegory beautifully imbues radical social politics with a sharp and intuitive eye for style and action. Upending the social structure of society and transposing it horizontally, the upper-class has become first-class on the Rattling Ark - a gigantic speed train hurtling across a world pushed into a second ice-age due to the meddling of man.

If this colossal locomotive were to stop moving, the last remnants of humanity would freeze to death, making the train's perpetual-motion engine both the beating heart of humankind and an exceptionally prized asset. A literal microcosm of a contemporary neoliberal society, those at the front of the train rule over the rest, with the rich dictating to the complicit, who in turn oppress the poor and underprivileged. However, as history has continually taught us, this type of dictatorship is unsustainable and revolution an inevitability. We thus board the Rattling Ark just as the seeds of disquiet begin to blossom into battle, with Evans' Curtis at the forefront of the uprising. A magnificent tapestry of rich visuals, futurist whimsy and dark social satire, Bong's Snowpiercer certainly isn't your average sci-fi epic. CineVue, Patrick Gamble

Thursday August 21, 2014

7:00pm

REPARANDO

0 MINS, G

REPARANDO: A documentary about Guatemala’s struggle to repair itself and its people following a 36-year civil war. Learn how this dark history is connected to current injustices and stories of hope in La Limonada, a large urban ghetto in Guatemala City.  
Tickets are for sale at the door - $10 (Cash Only). Snacks and merchandise are for purchase. All funds raised will support education development in La Limonada.

9:15pm

Snowpiercer

2014, USA/France/South Korea/Czech Republic, 126 MINS, 14A

Dir: Joon-ho Bong
Starring: Chris Evans, Jamie Bell, Tilda Swinton, Ed Harris

A stunning, visionary example of dystopian science fiction cinema at its very best, South Korean director Bong Joon-ho's Snowpiercer (2013) - based in the French graphic novel - is a blockbuster of gargantuan proportions. Starring a cavalcade of well-known faces including Tilda Swinton, Chris Evans and Song Kang-ho, this futuristic allegory beautifully imbues radical social politics with a sharp and intuitive eye for style and action. Upending the social structure of society and transposing it horizontally, the upper-class has become first-class on the Rattling Ark - a gigantic speed train hurtling across a world pushed into a second ice-age due to the meddling of man.

If this colossal locomotive were to stop moving, the last remnants of humanity would freeze to death, making the train's perpetual-motion engine both the beating heart of humankind and an exceptionally prized asset. A literal microcosm of a contemporary neoliberal society, those at the front of the train rule over the rest, with the rich dictating to the complicit, who in turn oppress the poor and underprivileged. However, as history has continually taught us, this type of dictatorship is unsustainable and revolution an inevitability. We thus board the Rattling Ark just as the seeds of disquiet begin to blossom into battle, with Evans' Curtis at the forefront of the uprising. A magnificent tapestry of rich visuals, futurist whimsy and dark social satire, Bong's Snowpiercer certainly isn't your average sci-fi epic. CineVue, Patrick Gamble

Friday August 22, 2014

7:00pm

And So It Goes

2014, USA, 94 MINS, PG

Dir: Rob Reiner
Starring: Michael Douglas, Diane Keaton, Sterling Jerins

Oren Little (Douglas) is a cynical, misanthropic realtor who has not quite recovered from his wife’s death and his estrangement from his only son. While trying to sell his family home, Oren moves into an apartment complex that he owns and becomes better acquainted with Leah (Keaton), a widow who is hoping to establish a career as a lounge singer. These two irritate each other whenever they meet, but they are forced to seek a rapprochement when Oren’s ex-junkie son, who is headed off to jail, drops his daughter on Oren’s doorstep. Oren never even knew he had a granddaughter, and he is horrified at the prospect of taking responsibility for her. So he enlists Leah to act as guardian while he tries to make other plans for the child.

Douglas has never been afraid to play abrasive, dislikable characters, and he brings an expert, sardonic edge to his putdowns of the people he encounters. Keaton is equally experienced at playing slightly ditzy but goodhearted women. The two stars click.  The Hollywood Reporter, Stephen Farber

9:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

Saturday August 23, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

How To Train Your Dragon 2 3-D

2014, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: Dean DeBlois
Starring: Jay Baruchel, Cate Blanchett, Gerard Butler

When last seen on the big screen four years ago, Hiccup had bonded with an injured dragon he named Toothless, proved that dragons could be man's best friends, and won his father's respect in the process. Now, barely out of his teens (though still voiced with wry charm by Jay Baruchel), he's faced with grave responsibilities—his father wants him to lead the tribe—and beset by self-doubt: "I know I'm not my father, and I never met my mother, so what does that make me?"

What that makes him, in the context of impending events, is a phenomenally confident self-doubter. A very bad guy named Drago, Hiccup learns, is threatening the tribe with a dragon army. The hero's father, Stoick the Vast (Gerard Butler), responds to the threat by shutting the city's gates and preparing for war. Hiccup, however, climbs aboard Toothless and seeks Drago out, hoping to show the mad tyrant the error of his ways.

Gleeful and smart, funny and serious, this sequel surpasses the endearing original with gorgeous animation—a dragon Eden, a dragon scourge, an infinitude of dragons—and one stirring human encounter after another.  The Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern

4:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

7:00pm

And So It Goes

2014, USA, 94 MINS, PG

Dir: Rob Reiner
Starring: Michael Douglas, Diane Keaton, Sterling Jerins

Oren Little (Douglas) is a cynical, misanthropic realtor who has not quite recovered from his wife’s death and his estrangement from his only son. While trying to sell his family home, Oren moves into an apartment complex that he owns and becomes better acquainted with Leah (Keaton), a widow who is hoping to establish a career as a lounge singer. These two irritate each other whenever they meet, but they are forced to seek a rapprochement when Oren’s ex-junkie son, who is headed off to jail, drops his daughter on Oren’s doorstep. Oren never even knew he had a granddaughter, and he is horrified at the prospect of taking responsibility for her. So he enlists Leah to act as guardian while he tries to make other plans for the child.

Douglas has never been afraid to play abrasive, dislikable characters, and he brings an expert, sardonic edge to his putdowns of the people he encounters. Keaton is equally experienced at playing slightly ditzy but goodhearted women. The two stars click.  The Hollywood Reporter, Stephen Farber

9:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

Sunday August 24, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

How To Train Your Dragon 2 3-D

2014, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: Dean DeBlois
Starring: Jay Baruchel, Cate Blanchett, Gerard Butler

When last seen on the big screen four years ago, Hiccup had bonded with an injured dragon he named Toothless, proved that dragons could be man's best friends, and won his father's respect in the process. Now, barely out of his teens (though still voiced with wry charm by Jay Baruchel), he's faced with grave responsibilities—his father wants him to lead the tribe—and beset by self-doubt: "I know I'm not my father, and I never met my mother, so what does that make me?"

What that makes him, in the context of impending events, is a phenomenally confident self-doubter. A very bad guy named Drago, Hiccup learns, is threatening the tribe with a dragon army. The hero's father, Stoick the Vast (Gerard Butler), responds to the threat by shutting the city's gates and preparing for war. Hiccup, however, climbs aboard Toothless and seeks Drago out, hoping to show the mad tyrant the error of his ways.

Gleeful and smart, funny and serious, this sequel surpasses the endearing original with gorgeous animation—a dragon Eden, a dragon scourge, an infinitude of dragons—and one stirring human encounter after another.  The Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern

4:00pm

And So It Goes

2014, USA, 94 MINS, PG

Dir: Rob Reiner
Starring: Michael Douglas, Diane Keaton, Sterling Jerins

Oren Little (Douglas) is a cynical, misanthropic realtor who has not quite recovered from his wife’s death and his estrangement from his only son. While trying to sell his family home, Oren moves into an apartment complex that he owns and becomes better acquainted with Leah (Keaton), a widow who is hoping to establish a career as a lounge singer. These two irritate each other whenever they meet, but they are forced to seek a rapprochement when Oren’s ex-junkie son, who is headed off to jail, drops his daughter on Oren’s doorstep. Oren never even knew he had a granddaughter, and he is horrified at the prospect of taking responsibility for her. So he enlists Leah to act as guardian while he tries to make other plans for the child.

Douglas has never been afraid to play abrasive, dislikable characters, and he brings an expert, sardonic edge to his putdowns of the people he encounters. Keaton is equally experienced at playing slightly ditzy but goodhearted women. The two stars click.  The Hollywood Reporter, Stephen Farber

7:00pm

And So It Goes

2014, USA, 94 MINS, PG

Dir: Rob Reiner
Starring: Michael Douglas, Diane Keaton, Sterling Jerins

Oren Little (Douglas) is a cynical, misanthropic realtor who has not quite recovered from his wife’s death and his estrangement from his only son. While trying to sell his family home, Oren moves into an apartment complex that he owns and becomes better acquainted with Leah (Keaton), a widow who is hoping to establish a career as a lounge singer. These two irritate each other whenever they meet, but they are forced to seek a rapprochement when Oren’s ex-junkie son, who is headed off to jail, drops his daughter on Oren’s doorstep. Oren never even knew he had a granddaughter, and he is horrified at the prospect of taking responsibility for her. So he enlists Leah to act as guardian while he tries to make other plans for the child.

Douglas has never been afraid to play abrasive, dislikable characters, and he brings an expert, sardonic edge to his putdowns of the people he encounters. Keaton is equally experienced at playing slightly ditzy but goodhearted women. The two stars click.  The Hollywood Reporter, Stephen Farber

9:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

Monday August 25, 2014

7:00pm

And So It Goes

2014, USA, 94 MINS, PG

Dir: Rob Reiner
Starring: Michael Douglas, Diane Keaton, Sterling Jerins

Oren Little (Douglas) is a cynical, misanthropic realtor who has not quite recovered from his wife’s death and his estrangement from his only son. While trying to sell his family home, Oren moves into an apartment complex that he owns and becomes better acquainted with Leah (Keaton), a widow who is hoping to establish a career as a lounge singer. These two irritate each other whenever they meet, but they are forced to seek a rapprochement when Oren’s ex-junkie son, who is headed off to jail, drops his daughter on Oren’s doorstep. Oren never even knew he had a granddaughter, and he is horrified at the prospect of taking responsibility for her. So he enlists Leah to act as guardian while he tries to make other plans for the child.

Douglas has never been afraid to play abrasive, dislikable characters, and he brings an expert, sardonic edge to his putdowns of the people he encounters. Keaton is equally experienced at playing slightly ditzy but goodhearted women. The two stars click.  The Hollywood Reporter, Stephen Farber

9:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

Tuesday August 26, 2014

7:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

9:15pm

And So It Goes

2014, USA, 94 MINS, PG

Dir: Rob Reiner
Starring: Michael Douglas, Diane Keaton, Sterling Jerins

Oren Little (Douglas) is a cynical, misanthropic realtor who has not quite recovered from his wife’s death and his estrangement from his only son. While trying to sell his family home, Oren moves into an apartment complex that he owns and becomes better acquainted with Leah (Keaton), a widow who is hoping to establish a career as a lounge singer. These two irritate each other whenever they meet, but they are forced to seek a rapprochement when Oren’s ex-junkie son, who is headed off to jail, drops his daughter on Oren’s doorstep. Oren never even knew he had a granddaughter, and he is horrified at the prospect of taking responsibility for her. So he enlists Leah to act as guardian while he tries to make other plans for the child.

Douglas has never been afraid to play abrasive, dislikable characters, and he brings an expert, sardonic edge to his putdowns of the people he encounters. Keaton is equally experienced at playing slightly ditzy but goodhearted women. The two stars click.  The Hollywood Reporter, Stephen Farber

Wednesday August 27, 2014

7:00pm

The Grand Budapest Hotel

2014, USA, Germany, 100 MINS, 14A

Dir: Wes Anderson
Starring: Ralph Fiennes, F. Murray Abraham, Mathieu Amalric

Set in the fictional former republic of Zubrowka, “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is related by an author (Tom Wilkinson) flashing back to 1968, when his younger self (Jude Law) listens to the life story of the mysterious multi-millionaire Zero Moustafa (F. Murray Abraham) in the declining grand hotel. Moustafa, the hotel’s owner, casts back even further, to 1932, during the hotel’s glory days, when he was a lobby boy and the Budapest was run by his mentor, the legendary concierge Gustave H. (Ralph Fiennes).

A holdover from a rapidly vanishing, more elegant era, Gustave is a model of impeccable manners and refinement, contrasted by a graphically vulgar vocabulary and an eyebrow-raising habit of seducing the hotel’s richest, and most elderly, female clientele. That’s how he becomes involved with Madame D. (Tilda Swinton), whose murder propels him into a battle for her immense fortune, aided by young Zero (Tony Revolori). 

If you admire Anderson at his best there’s a good chance you’ll be delighted by this masterfully executed, highly stylized, occasionally perverse farce, which takes his own personal brand of artifice to inspired new heights.  Bruce Ingram, Chicago Sun-Times. 

9:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

Thursday August 28, 2014

7:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

9:15pm

The Grand Budapest Hotel

2014, USA, Germany, 100 MINS, 14A

Dir: Wes Anderson
Starring: Ralph Fiennes, F. Murray Abraham, Mathieu Amalric

Set in the fictional former republic of Zubrowka, “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is related by an author (Tom Wilkinson) flashing back to 1968, when his younger self (Jude Law) listens to the life story of the mysterious multi-millionaire Zero Moustafa (F. Murray Abraham) in the declining grand hotel. Moustafa, the hotel’s owner, casts back even further, to 1932, during the hotel’s glory days, when he was a lobby boy and the Budapest was run by his mentor, the legendary concierge Gustave H. (Ralph Fiennes).

A holdover from a rapidly vanishing, more elegant era, Gustave is a model of impeccable manners and refinement, contrasted by a graphically vulgar vocabulary and an eyebrow-raising habit of seducing the hotel’s richest, and most elderly, female clientele. That’s how he becomes involved with Madame D. (Tilda Swinton), whose murder propels him into a battle for her immense fortune, aided by young Zero (Tony Revolori). 

If you admire Anderson at his best there’s a good chance you’ll be delighted by this masterfully executed, highly stylized, occasionally perverse farce, which takes his own personal brand of artifice to inspired new heights.  Bruce Ingram, Chicago Sun-Times. 

Friday August 29, 2014

7:00pm

Jersey Boys

2014, USA, 134 MINS, 14A

Dir: Clint Eastwood
Starring: John Lloyd Young, Erich Bergen, Michael Lomenda

In the Tony Award-winning musical Jersey Boys — and in director Clint Eastwood’s new movie version of the still-running 2005 Broadway smash — a successful teen songwriter named Bob Gaudio has a “eureka” moment the first time he hears the soaring, distinctive voice of Francis Stephen Castelluccio. Or, as that singer has been known for the better part of his life, Frankie Valli.

Listening to Valli’s range, emotion and vocal pyrotechnics, Gaudio knew he had found his instrument, the ideal interpreter of whatever hit he could dream up.

And once he and Valli partnered with Tommy DeVito and Nick Massi to become The Four Seasons, there were so many hits: Sherry, Big Girls Don’t Cry, Walk Like a Man, Bye Bye Baby. There were also Valli solo hits, like Can’t Take My Eyes Off You and My Eyes Adored You.

If you happened to be young in the 1960s and ’70s, if you had a particular radio-friendly Top 40 taste in music, Valli and the Four Seasons probably supplied the soundtrack to plenty of your coming-of-age adventures.  Miami Herald, Christine Dolan



9:30pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

Saturday August 30, 2014

1:30pm

3D Screening

X-Men: Days of Future Past 3-D

2014, USA, 131 MINS, PG

Dir: Bryan Singer
Starring: Jennifer Lawrence, Hugh Jackman

 

Loosely adapted from the classic Chris Claremont comic storyline of the same name, X-Men: Days of Future Past sees the big screen’s original X-Men (Wolverine, Professor X, Storm, Kitty Pryde, Iceman, Colossus, and even their one-time enemy Magneto) and their latest members (Bishop, Warpath, Sunspot, and Blink) living in a dystopian future where the massive mutant-hunting Sentinels have practically exterminated mutants, incarcerating the surviving ones in concentration camps with the humans who helped them. The only way for the X-Men to survive is to send one of their own back in time telepathically in order to stop the assassination that paved the way for the mutant holocaust. The film's action sequences are well-done and engaging, from its opening scene of the future X-Men falling to the Sentinels to the Paris standoff through to the climactic battle in Washington D.C. 

Days of Future Past is the most ambitious entry in the franchise and also the most rewarding, allowing fans to see the casts of both the original trilogy and First Class join forces in one action-packed, high-stakes, and surprisingly witty adventure film. 

Jim Vejvoda, IGN.com



4:00pm

Jersey Boys

2014, USA, 134 MINS, 14A

Dir: Clint Eastwood
Starring: John Lloyd Young, Erich Bergen, Michael Lomenda

In the Tony Award-winning musical Jersey Boys — and in director Clint Eastwood’s new movie version of the still-running 2005 Broadway smash — a successful teen songwriter named Bob Gaudio has a “eureka” moment the first time he hears the soaring, distinctive voice of Francis Stephen Castelluccio. Or, as that singer has been known for the better part of his life, Frankie Valli.

Listening to Valli’s range, emotion and vocal pyrotechnics, Gaudio knew he had found his instrument, the ideal interpreter of whatever hit he could dream up.

And once he and Valli partnered with Tommy DeVito and Nick Massi to become The Four Seasons, there were so many hits: Sherry, Big Girls Don’t Cry, Walk Like a Man, Bye Bye Baby. There were also Valli solo hits, like Can’t Take My Eyes Off You and My Eyes Adored You.

If you happened to be young in the 1960s and ’70s, if you had a particular radio-friendly Top 40 taste in music, Valli and the Four Seasons probably supplied the soundtrack to plenty of your coming-of-age adventures.  Miami Herald, Christine Dolan



7:00pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

9:15pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

Sunday August 31, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

X-Men: Days of Future Past 3-D

2014, USA, 131 MINS, PG

Dir: Bryan Singer
Starring: Jennifer Lawrence, Hugh Jackman

 

Loosely adapted from the classic Chris Claremont comic storyline of the same name, X-Men: Days of Future Past sees the big screen’s original X-Men (Wolverine, Professor X, Storm, Kitty Pryde, Iceman, Colossus, and even their one-time enemy Magneto) and their latest members (Bishop, Warpath, Sunspot, and Blink) living in a dystopian future where the massive mutant-hunting Sentinels have practically exterminated mutants, incarcerating the surviving ones in concentration camps with the humans who helped them. The only way for the X-Men to survive is to send one of their own back in time telepathically in order to stop the assassination that paved the way for the mutant holocaust. The film's action sequences are well-done and engaging, from its opening scene of the future X-Men falling to the Sentinels to the Paris standoff through to the climactic battle in Washington D.C. 

Days of Future Past is the most ambitious entry in the franchise and also the most rewarding, allowing fans to see the casts of both the original trilogy and First Class join forces in one action-packed, high-stakes, and surprisingly witty adventure film. 

Jim Vejvoda, IGN.com



4:15pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

7:00pm

Jersey Boys

2014, USA, 134 MINS, 14A

Dir: Clint Eastwood
Starring: John Lloyd Young, Erich Bergen, Michael Lomenda

In the Tony Award-winning musical Jersey Boys — and in director Clint Eastwood’s new movie version of the still-running 2005 Broadway smash — a successful teen songwriter named Bob Gaudio has a “eureka” moment the first time he hears the soaring, distinctive voice of Francis Stephen Castelluccio. Or, as that singer has been known for the better part of his life, Frankie Valli.

Listening to Valli’s range, emotion and vocal pyrotechnics, Gaudio knew he had found his instrument, the ideal interpreter of whatever hit he could dream up.

And once he and Valli partnered with Tommy DeVito and Nick Massi to become The Four Seasons, there were so many hits: Sherry, Big Girls Don’t Cry, Walk Like a Man, Bye Bye Baby. There were also Valli solo hits, like Can’t Take My Eyes Off You and My Eyes Adored You.

If you happened to be young in the 1960s and ’70s, if you had a particular radio-friendly Top 40 taste in music, Valli and the Four Seasons probably supplied the soundtrack to plenty of your coming-of-age adventures.  Miami Herald, Christine Dolan



9:30pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

Monday September 1, 2014

1:30pm

3D Screening

X-Men: Days of Future Past 3-D

2014, USA, 131 MINS, PG

Dir: Bryan Singer
Starring: Jennifer Lawrence, Hugh Jackman

 

Loosely adapted from the classic Chris Claremont comic storyline of the same name, X-Men: Days of Future Past sees the big screen’s original X-Men (Wolverine, Professor X, Storm, Kitty Pryde, Iceman, Colossus, and even their one-time enemy Magneto) and their latest members (Bishop, Warpath, Sunspot, and Blink) living in a dystopian future where the massive mutant-hunting Sentinels have practically exterminated mutants, incarcerating the surviving ones in concentration camps with the humans who helped them. The only way for the X-Men to survive is to send one of their own back in time telepathically in order to stop the assassination that paved the way for the mutant holocaust. The film's action sequences are well-done and engaging, from its opening scene of the future X-Men falling to the Sentinels to the Paris standoff through to the climactic battle in Washington D.C. 

Days of Future Past is the most ambitious entry in the franchise and also the most rewarding, allowing fans to see the casts of both the original trilogy and First Class join forces in one action-packed, high-stakes, and surprisingly witty adventure film. 

Jim Vejvoda, IGN.com



4:00pm

Jersey Boys

2014, USA, 134 MINS, 14A

Dir: Clint Eastwood
Starring: John Lloyd Young, Erich Bergen, Michael Lomenda

In the Tony Award-winning musical Jersey Boys — and in director Clint Eastwood’s new movie version of the still-running 2005 Broadway smash — a successful teen songwriter named Bob Gaudio has a “eureka” moment the first time he hears the soaring, distinctive voice of Francis Stephen Castelluccio. Or, as that singer has been known for the better part of his life, Frankie Valli.

Listening to Valli’s range, emotion and vocal pyrotechnics, Gaudio knew he had found his instrument, the ideal interpreter of whatever hit he could dream up.

And once he and Valli partnered with Tommy DeVito and Nick Massi to become The Four Seasons, there were so many hits: Sherry, Big Girls Don’t Cry, Walk Like a Man, Bye Bye Baby. There were also Valli solo hits, like Can’t Take My Eyes Off You and My Eyes Adored You.

If you happened to be young in the 1960s and ’70s, if you had a particular radio-friendly Top 40 taste in music, Valli and the Four Seasons probably supplied the soundtrack to plenty of your coming-of-age adventures.  Miami Herald, Christine Dolan



7:00pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

9:15pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

August 2014

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