Now Playing

Today - Saturday February 28, 2015

2:00pm

Big Hero 6 3D

2014, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: Don Hall, Chris Williams
Starring: Ryan Potter, Jamie Chung

Big Hero 6 transports us to the world of “San Fransokyo,” an east-meets-west futuristic city where young Hiro Hamada (Ryan Potter) and his big brother Tadashi (Daniel Henney) spend their days (and nights) inventing advanced robotics. However, where Tadashi works on robots that can help better the world, Hiro squanders his gift hustling for cash in the underground robot fighting circuit. Things change when Tadashi finally manages to inspire Hiro towards a greater goal: attending the robotics university where Tadashi and his four friends (Honey Lemon, Go Go, Wasabi and Fred) hatch brilliant new tech designs in their nerd lab think-tank.

Big Hero 6 combines Disney wonder and charm with Marvel awe and action to deliver a film that exhibits the best of both studios. This film takes an obscure (and strange) comic book and transforms it into something fun and refreshingly different, with loads of mainstream appeal. That’s no small accomplishment.

4:00pm

Wild

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 18A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Laura Dern, Reese Witherspoon

“Wild” opens with a shot of majestic forested mountains and the sound of a woman breathing harder and harder. The woman turns out to be a hiker, Cheryl Strayed (Reese Witherspoon), with a huge pack on her back, laboring to reach an exposed high place.

“Wild” is based on Strayed’s autobiographical best-seller, published in 2012, seventeen years after her arduous trek, which she reconstructed in punishing and exhilarating detail. Her mother died in 1991, and Strayed, grief-stricken and lost, cheated on her devoted husband (played by Thomas Sadoski in the film), and, with one lover, fell into a heroin haze. In 1995, she walked eleven hundred miles, through desert, bush, and snowy mountains, from Mojave, California, to the Oregon-Washington border. Each stopping place in the wilderness is a kind of marker along the road to redemption. Sweating and freezing, Cheryl wants to expunge loss and self-disgust from her soul.  “Wild” is about the renewal of self, but it’s a film made without sanctimony or piety. Here Witherspoon is a good actress playing an intelligent, well-read, ambitious, but screwed-up woman.

7:00pm

Wild

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 18A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Laura Dern, Reese Witherspoon

“Wild” opens with a shot of majestic forested mountains and the sound of a woman breathing harder and harder. The woman turns out to be a hiker, Cheryl Strayed (Reese Witherspoon), with a huge pack on her back, laboring to reach an exposed high place.

“Wild” is based on Strayed’s autobiographical best-seller, published in 2012, seventeen years after her arduous trek, which she reconstructed in punishing and exhilarating detail. Her mother died in 1991, and Strayed, grief-stricken and lost, cheated on her devoted husband (played by Thomas Sadoski in the film), and, with one lover, fell into a heroin haze. In 1995, she walked eleven hundred miles, through desert, bush, and snowy mountains, from Mojave, California, to the Oregon-Washington border. Each stopping place in the wilderness is a kind of marker along the road to redemption. Sweating and freezing, Cheryl wants to expunge loss and self-disgust from her soul.  “Wild” is about the renewal of self, but it’s a film made without sanctimony or piety. Here Witherspoon is a good actress playing an intelligent, well-read, ambitious, but screwed-up woman.

9:20pm

Birdman (or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)

2014, USA/France, 119 MINS, 14A

Dir: Alejandro González Iñárritu
Starring: Edward Norton, Michael Keaton, Emma Stone, Naomi Watts

At the beginning of Birdman (or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance), Michael Keaton's brooding, jittery Riggan Thomson, a Hollywood star faded from view, is in the lotus position, in his underpants, meditating. In his own mind at least (and isn't that what meditation is all about?), he is doing transcendent stuff.

But maybe it's not just in his mind.

Like its cross-legged protagonist - famous way-back-when as the titular superhero of a blockbuster franchise and now trying to reclaim his career, his legitimacy, and his soul by staging his adaptation of a Raymond Carver story on Broadway - Birdman operates on a whole other plane of existence.  With its improvisatory score (drummer Antonio Sanchez provides a hustling backbeat throughout), its seamless shots, its leaps into the surreal, and then back again into the excruciating, embarrassing real, Birdman ascends to the greatest of heights. - Steven Rea/Philadelphia Inquirer

Sunday March 1, 2015

2:00pm

Big Hero 6 3D

2014, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: Don Hall, Chris Williams
Starring: Ryan Potter, Jamie Chung

Big Hero 6 transports us to the world of “San Fransokyo,” an east-meets-west futuristic city where young Hiro Hamada (Ryan Potter) and his big brother Tadashi (Daniel Henney) spend their days (and nights) inventing advanced robotics. However, where Tadashi works on robots that can help better the world, Hiro squanders his gift hustling for cash in the underground robot fighting circuit. Things change when Tadashi finally manages to inspire Hiro towards a greater goal: attending the robotics university where Tadashi and his four friends (Honey Lemon, Go Go, Wasabi and Fred) hatch brilliant new tech designs in their nerd lab think-tank.

Big Hero 6 combines Disney wonder and charm with Marvel awe and action to deliver a film that exhibits the best of both studios. This film takes an obscure (and strange) comic book and transforms it into something fun and refreshingly different, with loads of mainstream appeal. That’s no small accomplishment.

4:00pm

Wild

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 18A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Laura Dern, Reese Witherspoon

“Wild” opens with a shot of majestic forested mountains and the sound of a woman breathing harder and harder. The woman turns out to be a hiker, Cheryl Strayed (Reese Witherspoon), with a huge pack on her back, laboring to reach an exposed high place.

“Wild” is based on Strayed’s autobiographical best-seller, published in 2012, seventeen years after her arduous trek, which she reconstructed in punishing and exhilarating detail. Her mother died in 1991, and Strayed, grief-stricken and lost, cheated on her devoted husband (played by Thomas Sadoski in the film), and, with one lover, fell into a heroin haze. In 1995, she walked eleven hundred miles, through desert, bush, and snowy mountains, from Mojave, California, to the Oregon-Washington border. Each stopping place in the wilderness is a kind of marker along the road to redemption. Sweating and freezing, Cheryl wants to expunge loss and self-disgust from her soul.  “Wild” is about the renewal of self, but it’s a film made without sanctimony or piety. Here Witherspoon is a good actress playing an intelligent, well-read, ambitious, but screwed-up woman.

7:00pm

Wild

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 18A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Laura Dern, Reese Witherspoon

“Wild” opens with a shot of majestic forested mountains and the sound of a woman breathing harder and harder. The woman turns out to be a hiker, Cheryl Strayed (Reese Witherspoon), with a huge pack on her back, laboring to reach an exposed high place.

“Wild” is based on Strayed’s autobiographical best-seller, published in 2012, seventeen years after her arduous trek, which she reconstructed in punishing and exhilarating detail. Her mother died in 1991, and Strayed, grief-stricken and lost, cheated on her devoted husband (played by Thomas Sadoski in the film), and, with one lover, fell into a heroin haze. In 1995, she walked eleven hundred miles, through desert, bush, and snowy mountains, from Mojave, California, to the Oregon-Washington border. Each stopping place in the wilderness is a kind of marker along the road to redemption. Sweating and freezing, Cheryl wants to expunge loss and self-disgust from her soul.  “Wild” is about the renewal of self, but it’s a film made without sanctimony or piety. Here Witherspoon is a good actress playing an intelligent, well-read, ambitious, but screwed-up woman.

9:20pm

Birdman (or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)

2014, USA/France, 119 MINS, 14A

Dir: Alejandro González Iñárritu
Starring: Edward Norton, Michael Keaton, Emma Stone, Naomi Watts

At the beginning of Birdman (or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance), Michael Keaton's brooding, jittery Riggan Thomson, a Hollywood star faded from view, is in the lotus position, in his underpants, meditating. In his own mind at least (and isn't that what meditation is all about?), he is doing transcendent stuff.

But maybe it's not just in his mind.

Like its cross-legged protagonist - famous way-back-when as the titular superhero of a blockbuster franchise and now trying to reclaim his career, his legitimacy, and his soul by staging his adaptation of a Raymond Carver story on Broadway - Birdman operates on a whole other plane of existence.  With its improvisatory score (drummer Antonio Sanchez provides a hustling backbeat throughout), its seamless shots, its leaps into the surreal, and then back again into the excruciating, embarrassing real, Birdman ascends to the greatest of heights. - Steven Rea/Philadelphia Inquirer

Monday March 2, 2015

7:00pm

Wild

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 18A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Reese Witherspoon, Laura Dern, Gaby Hoffmann

Producer-star Reese Witherspoon kicks out the jams in Wild. She's a live wire as Cheryl Strayed, a sleep-around heroin dabbler who, in 1995, found a unique way to deal with her painful lack of self-esteem and the death of her mother (a wonderfully funny and touching Laura Dern): hike the Pacific Crest Trail by herself for 1,100 miles. It's a showstopping performance from an actress who keeps springing surprises. With the help of a scrappy script by Nick Hornby (About a Boy) that allows bursts of humor to break through the darkness, Witherspoon cuts to the bruised core of Cheryl's heart, rattling between desperation and determination. Under the keen-eyed direction of Jean-Marc Vallée (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild emerges as an exciting, elemental adventure that takes you places you don't see coming.  - Peter Travers, RollingStone 

9:30pm

Birdman (or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)

2014, USA/France, 119 MINS, 14A

Dir: Alejandro González Iñárritu
Starring: Edward Norton, Michael Keaton, Emma Stone, Naomi Watts

At the beginning of Birdman (or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance), Michael Keaton's brooding, jittery Riggan Thomson, a Hollywood star faded from view, is in the lotus position, in his underpants, meditating. In his own mind at least (and isn't that what meditation is all about?), he is doing transcendent stuff.

But maybe it's not just in his mind.

Like its cross-legged protagonist - famous way-back-when as the titular superhero of a blockbuster franchise and now trying to reclaim his career, his legitimacy, and his soul by staging his adaptation of a Raymond Carver story on Broadway - Birdman operates on a whole other plane of existence.  With its improvisatory score (drummer Antonio Sanchez provides a hustling backbeat throughout), its seamless shots, its leaps into the surreal, and then back again into the excruciating, embarrassing real, Birdman ascends to the greatest of heights. - Steven Rea/Philadelphia Inquirer

Tuesday March 3, 2015

7:00pm

Wild

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 18A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Reese Witherspoon, Laura Dern, Gaby Hoffmann

Producer-star Reese Witherspoon kicks out the jams in Wild. She's a live wire as Cheryl Strayed, a sleep-around heroin dabbler who, in 1995, found a unique way to deal with her painful lack of self-esteem and the death of her mother (a wonderfully funny and touching Laura Dern): hike the Pacific Crest Trail by herself for 1,100 miles. It's a showstopping performance from an actress who keeps springing surprises. With the help of a scrappy script by Nick Hornby (About a Boy) that allows bursts of humor to break through the darkness, Witherspoon cuts to the bruised core of Cheryl's heart, rattling between desperation and determination. Under the keen-eyed direction of Jean-Marc Vallée (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild emerges as an exciting, elemental adventure that takes you places you don't see coming.  - Peter Travers, RollingStone 

9:30pm

Birdman (or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)

2014, USA/France, 119 MINS, 14A

Dir: Alejandro González Iñárritu
Starring: Edward Norton, Michael Keaton, Emma Stone, Naomi Watts

At the beginning of Birdman (or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance), Michael Keaton's brooding, jittery Riggan Thomson, a Hollywood star faded from view, is in the lotus position, in his underpants, meditating. In his own mind at least (and isn't that what meditation is all about?), he is doing transcendent stuff.

But maybe it's not just in his mind.

Like its cross-legged protagonist - famous way-back-when as the titular superhero of a blockbuster franchise and now trying to reclaim his career, his legitimacy, and his soul by staging his adaptation of a Raymond Carver story on Broadway - Birdman operates on a whole other plane of existence.  With its improvisatory score (drummer Antonio Sanchez provides a hustling backbeat throughout), its seamless shots, its leaps into the surreal, and then back again into the excruciating, embarrassing real, Birdman ascends to the greatest of heights. - Steven Rea/Philadelphia Inquirer

Wednesday March 4, 2015

7:00pm

Birdman (or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)

2014, USA/France, 119 MINS, 14A

Dir: Alejandro González Iñárritu
Starring: Edward Norton, Michael Keaton, Emma Stone, Naomi Watts

At the beginning of Birdman (or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance), Michael Keaton's brooding, jittery Riggan Thomson, a Hollywood star faded from view, is in the lotus position, in his underpants, meditating. In his own mind at least (and isn't that what meditation is all about?), he is doing transcendent stuff.

But maybe it's not just in his mind.

Like its cross-legged protagonist - famous way-back-when as the titular superhero of a blockbuster franchise and now trying to reclaim his career, his legitimacy, and his soul by staging his adaptation of a Raymond Carver story on Broadway - Birdman operates on a whole other plane of existence.  With its improvisatory score (drummer Antonio Sanchez provides a hustling backbeat throughout), its seamless shots, its leaps into the surreal, and then back again into the excruciating, embarrassing real, Birdman ascends to the greatest of heights. - Steven Rea/Philadelphia Inquirer

9:30pm

The Theory of Everything

2014, UK, 123 MINS, PG

Dir: James Marsh
Starring: Felicity Jones, Tom Prior

Here is a charming, moving and powerfully acted film about the enigma that is Stephen W Hawking, the Cambridge theoretical physicist who survived a form of motor neurone disease (MND) that was expected to kill him by his mid-20s, and became a pioneer of the study of black holes, a bestselling author and the world’s most famous wheelchair user. 

Hawking has MND and two years to live. His girlfriend, Jane, played with fierce, pinched determination and English-rose beauty by Felicity Jones, refuses to give up on him. They marry and have children; the two-year mortality deadline comes and goes. Here the film departs from the norm, showing how Stephen and Jane effectively converted their marriage into something like an open relationship. 

The title refers to Hawking’s quest for an all-encompassing theory of the physical universe, but the pathos of the film is that in ordinary life, not everything can be made to fit and make sense. Compromises must be made; people must muddle through. It is a gentle, tender story of lovers who found friendship during and after their marriage.

Thursday March 5, 2015

7:00pm

The Theory of Everything

2014, UK, 123 MINS, PG

Dir: James Marsh
Starring: Felicity Jones, Tom Prior

Here is a charming, moving and powerfully acted film about the enigma that is Stephen W Hawking, the Cambridge theoretical physicist who survived a form of motor neurone disease (MND) that was expected to kill him by his mid-20s, and became a pioneer of the study of black holes, a bestselling author and the world’s most famous wheelchair user. 

Hawking has MND and two years to live. His girlfriend, Jane, played with fierce, pinched determination and English-rose beauty by Felicity Jones, refuses to give up on him. They marry and have children; the two-year mortality deadline comes and goes. Here the film departs from the norm, showing how Stephen and Jane effectively converted their marriage into something like an open relationship. 

The title refers to Hawking’s quest for an all-encompassing theory of the physical universe, but the pathos of the film is that in ordinary life, not everything can be made to fit and make sense. Compromises must be made; people must muddle through. It is a gentle, tender story of lovers who found friendship during and after their marriage.

9:30pm

Wild

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 18A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Reese Witherspoon, Laura Dern, Gaby Hoffmann

Producer-star Reese Witherspoon kicks out the jams in Wild. She's a live wire as Cheryl Strayed, a sleep-around heroin dabbler who, in 1995, found a unique way to deal with her painful lack of self-esteem and the death of her mother (a wonderfully funny and touching Laura Dern): hike the Pacific Crest Trail by herself for 1,100 miles. It's a showstopping performance from an actress who keeps springing surprises. With the help of a scrappy script by Nick Hornby (About a Boy) that allows bursts of humor to break through the darkness, Witherspoon cuts to the bruised core of Cheryl's heart, rattling between desperation and determination. Under the keen-eyed direction of Jean-Marc Vallée (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild emerges as an exciting, elemental adventure that takes you places you don't see coming.  - Peter Travers, RollingStone 

Friday March 6, 2015

7:00pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



9:30pm

Whiplash

2014, USA, 107 MINS, 14A

Dir: Damien Chazelle
Starring: Miles Teller, JK Simmons, Paul Reiser

Miles Teller, the soulful 27-year-old actor who gave notice in last year's The Spectacular Now, stars as Andrew Neiman — a gifted jazz drummer attending New York's hypercompetitive Shaffer Conservatory of Music (a fictional school clearly modeled after Juilliard). Andrew is a cocky prodigy who's driven not only to be great but to be one of the Greats, like his rat-a-tat dervish hero Buddy Rich. As the film opens, with the screen still black, we hear the slow build of a snare drum. It's Andrew practicing. The tempo builds faster and faster until it reaches a fever pitch, which is exactly what writer-director Damien Chazelle's film is about to do too. Because standing in the doorway is Terence Fletcher (J.K. Simmons), the hard-ass maestro who looms over the school like R. Lee Ermey's barking drill sergeant from Full Metal Jacket. Ropy and muscular, dressed all in black, and capped by a chrome dome with veins squiggling up his temples like the seams on a baseball, Fletcher closes his eyes and listens — really listens. He's trying to divine whether Andrew has the chops to join his elite student band...or if he just wants to chew the kid up and spit him out. Maybe both. Chris Nashawaty-Entertainment Weekly

Saturday March 7, 2015

2:00pm

Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb

204, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Shawn Levy
Starring: Robin Williams, Ben Stiller, Rebel Wilson

An opening flashback makes it clear that an explorer’s century-old defilement of an Egyptian tomb has triggered a delayed curse: an ancient tablet – resembling a keypad – is failing in its magical power to bring the museum exhibits to life. To rectify things, Ben Stiller’s long-suffering guard must take his entire gang to London to talk to the ancient Egyptians there. It’s all likable fun.

 

The Guardian, Peter Bradshaw

4:00pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



7:00pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



9:30pm

Whiplash

2014, USA, 107 MINS, 14A

Dir: Damien Chazelle
Starring: Miles Teller, JK Simmons, Paul Reiser

Miles Teller, the soulful 27-year-old actor who gave notice in last year's The Spectacular Now, stars as Andrew Neiman — a gifted jazz drummer attending New York's hypercompetitive Shaffer Conservatory of Music (a fictional school clearly modeled after Juilliard). Andrew is a cocky prodigy who's driven not only to be great but to be one of the Greats, like his rat-a-tat dervish hero Buddy Rich. As the film opens, with the screen still black, we hear the slow build of a snare drum. It's Andrew practicing. The tempo builds faster and faster until it reaches a fever pitch, which is exactly what writer-director Damien Chazelle's film is about to do too. Because standing in the doorway is Terence Fletcher (J.K. Simmons), the hard-ass maestro who looms over the school like R. Lee Ermey's barking drill sergeant from Full Metal Jacket. Ropy and muscular, dressed all in black, and capped by a chrome dome with veins squiggling up his temples like the seams on a baseball, Fletcher closes his eyes and listens — really listens. He's trying to divine whether Andrew has the chops to join his elite student band...or if he just wants to chew the kid up and spit him out. Maybe both. Chris Nashawaty-Entertainment Weekly

Sunday March 8, 2015

2:00pm

Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb

204, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Shawn Levy
Starring: Robin Williams, Ben Stiller, Rebel Wilson

An opening flashback makes it clear that an explorer’s century-old defilement of an Egyptian tomb has triggered a delayed curse: an ancient tablet – resembling a keypad – is failing in its magical power to bring the museum exhibits to life. To rectify things, Ben Stiller’s long-suffering guard must take his entire gang to London to talk to the ancient Egyptians there. It’s all likable fun.

 

The Guardian, Peter Bradshaw

4:00pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



7:00pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



9:30pm

Whiplash

2014, USA, 107 MINS, 14A

Dir: Damien Chazelle
Starring: Miles Teller, JK Simmons, Paul Reiser

Miles Teller, the soulful 27-year-old actor who gave notice in last year's The Spectacular Now, stars as Andrew Neiman — a gifted jazz drummer attending New York's hypercompetitive Shaffer Conservatory of Music (a fictional school clearly modeled after Juilliard). Andrew is a cocky prodigy who's driven not only to be great but to be one of the Greats, like his rat-a-tat dervish hero Buddy Rich. As the film opens, with the screen still black, we hear the slow build of a snare drum. It's Andrew practicing. The tempo builds faster and faster until it reaches a fever pitch, which is exactly what writer-director Damien Chazelle's film is about to do too. Because standing in the doorway is Terence Fletcher (J.K. Simmons), the hard-ass maestro who looms over the school like R. Lee Ermey's barking drill sergeant from Full Metal Jacket. Ropy and muscular, dressed all in black, and capped by a chrome dome with veins squiggling up his temples like the seams on a baseball, Fletcher closes his eyes and listens — really listens. He's trying to divine whether Andrew has the chops to join his elite student band...or if he just wants to chew the kid up and spit him out. Maybe both. Chris Nashawaty-Entertainment Weekly

Monday March 9, 2015

7:00pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



9:30pm

Whiplash

2014, USA, 107 MINS, 14A

Dir: Damien Chazelle
Starring: Miles Teller, JK Simmons, Paul Reiser

Miles Teller, the soulful 27-year-old actor who gave notice in last year's The Spectacular Now, stars as Andrew Neiman — a gifted jazz drummer attending New York's hypercompetitive Shaffer Conservatory of Music (a fictional school clearly modeled after Juilliard). Andrew is a cocky prodigy who's driven not only to be great but to be one of the Greats, like his rat-a-tat dervish hero Buddy Rich. As the film opens, with the screen still black, we hear the slow build of a snare drum. It's Andrew practicing. The tempo builds faster and faster until it reaches a fever pitch, which is exactly what writer-director Damien Chazelle's film is about to do too. Because standing in the doorway is Terence Fletcher (J.K. Simmons), the hard-ass maestro who looms over the school like R. Lee Ermey's barking drill sergeant from Full Metal Jacket. Ropy and muscular, dressed all in black, and capped by a chrome dome with veins squiggling up his temples like the seams on a baseball, Fletcher closes his eyes and listens — really listens. He's trying to divine whether Andrew has the chops to join his elite student band...or if he just wants to chew the kid up and spit him out. Maybe both. Chris Nashawaty-Entertainment Weekly

Tuesday March 10, 2015

7:00pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



Wednesday March 11, 2015

7:00pm

Selma

2014, USA, 128 MINS, PG

Dir: Ava DuVernay
Starring: David Oyelowo, Carmen Ejogo, Tim Roth

Selma wisely bites off no more than it needs to. Its focus is Martin Luther King in 1965, when he had given his “I have a dream” speech and received the Nobel peace prize, but was still frustrated by the lack of genuine progress on civil rights.

Selma became the flashpoint for the next battle – the right of African-Americans to vote freely – and the greatest strength of Ava DuVernay’s movie is in detailing how strategic King’s leadership was, and how non-violent protest was most effective when it was met with violence. Selma was selected as the battleground precisely on account of its brutal law enforcement and racist governor, George Wallace (Tim Roth somehow fits the role perfectly), all the better to generate newsworthy clashes and thus communicate the struggle to the American people, and ultimately to the White House.

Selma is unimpeachably important, ambitious in its scope and handsomely presented.

Steve Ross, The Guardian



9:30pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



Thursday March 12, 2015

7:00pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



9:30pm

Selma

2014, USA, 128 MINS, PG

Dir: Ava DuVernay
Starring: David Oyelowo, Carmen Ejogo, Tim Roth

Selma wisely bites off no more than it needs to. Its focus is Martin Luther King in 1965, when he had given his “I have a dream” speech and received the Nobel peace prize, but was still frustrated by the lack of genuine progress on civil rights.

Selma became the flashpoint for the next battle – the right of African-Americans to vote freely – and the greatest strength of Ava DuVernay’s movie is in detailing how strategic King’s leadership was, and how non-violent protest was most effective when it was met with violence. Selma was selected as the battleground precisely on account of its brutal law enforcement and racist governor, George Wallace (Tim Roth somehow fits the role perfectly), all the better to generate newsworthy clashes and thus communicate the struggle to the American people, and ultimately to the White House.

Selma is unimpeachably important, ambitious in its scope and handsomely presented.

Steve Ross, The Guardian



Friday March 13, 2015

7:00pm

Wild

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 18A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Reese Witherspoon, Laura Dern, Gaby Hoffmann

Producer-star Reese Witherspoon kicks out the jams in Wild. She's a live wire as Cheryl Strayed, a sleep-around heroin dabbler who, in 1995, found a unique way to deal with her painful lack of self-esteem and the death of her mother (a wonderfully funny and touching Laura Dern): hike the Pacific Crest Trail by herself for 1,100 miles. It's a showstopping performance from an actress who keeps springing surprises. With the help of a scrappy script by Nick Hornby (About a Boy) that allows bursts of humor to break through the darkness, Witherspoon cuts to the bruised core of Cheryl's heart, rattling between desperation and determination. Under the keen-eyed direction of Jean-Marc Vallée (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild emerges as an exciting, elemental adventure that takes you places you don't see coming.  - Peter Travers, RollingStone 

9:30pm

A Most Violent Year

2014, USA, 124 MINS, 14A

Dir: J.C. Chandor
Starring: Jessica Chastain, Oscar Isaac

Oscar Isaac’s deep brown orbs reveal everything and nothing about his character Abel Morales. He’s an ambitious heating-oil entrepreneur in the crime-ridden New York of 1981, a place and era familiar from the films of Sidney Lumet, whose influence is seen and felt.

Abel is trying to close a major waterfront land deal that will give his firm, Standard Heating Oil, the edge in a cutthroat industry. But thugs connected to rival concerns keep attacking his drivers and salesmen and stealing his oil. This threatens his livelihood — and maybe also his life.

Chandor and cinematographer Bradford Young bring an assured sense of menace to the film, carefully raising the stakes with visual cues and clues.

Saturday March 14, 2015

1:45pm

Paddington

2014, UK, 95 MINS, G

Dir: Paul King
Starring: Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins

“Paddington,” a live-action/CGI-animated take on the tales of the beloved stuffed bear, pulls off a pretty tricky balancing act. It manages to be both old-fashioned and high-tech. It remains faithful to the character’s roots while also placing him firmly within a contemporary setting. It’s charmingly funny and shamelessly punny. (This is a movie in which the GPS instructs a driver to bear left during a car chase, and whaddya know – there’s a bear on the left.)

King’s film offers an origin story for the marmalade-obsessed bear from Michael Bond’s children’s books. When we first meet Paddington (voiced sweetly by Ben Whishaw with some light touches reminiscent of Robin Williams), he’s living in Darkest Peru with his aunt and uncle (Imelda Staunton and Michael Gambon). Years earlier, a British explorer had visited and was amazed to discover the existence of such brilliant, talking bears. Now, when it comes time for young Paddington to make his own way in the world, his aunt sends him to London, since the explorer promised that they’d always be welcome there.

Christy Lemire, rogerebert.com

3:45pm

Mr. Turner

2014, UK, 149 MINS, 14A

Dir: Mike Leigh
Starring: Timothy Spall, Dorothy Atkinson

Keen observer Mike Leigh brings his hawk’s eye to a vibrant rendering of J.M.W. Turner, the celebrated British “painter of light.” The artist is played to perfection by Timothy Spall, who spent two years preparing for the role and who won Best Actor for his efforts at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Spall portrays Turner as a grunting vulgarian. That dismissive grunt is key to his portrayal of a man whose appreciation of life lies entirely on the canvas, which he assaults with a fury of colour and brush strokes.

The film covers the last 25 of Turner’s adult years, finding him restless in London upon his return from overseas travels (including a painterly sojourn to Holland gloriously glimpsed at the outset). It’s only when he travels to the seaside town of Margate, where he roamed as a lad, that his perpetual distemper lifts. There he meets Mrs. Booth (Marion Bailey), the keeper of the inn where he stays, who is curious about this odd and obsessive man. Mrs. Booth finds the man within the ogre.


Peter Howell, The Star



7:00pm

Wild

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 18A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Reese Witherspoon, Laura Dern, Gaby Hoffmann

Producer-star Reese Witherspoon kicks out the jams in Wild. She's a live wire as Cheryl Strayed, a sleep-around heroin dabbler who, in 1995, found a unique way to deal with her painful lack of self-esteem and the death of her mother (a wonderfully funny and touching Laura Dern): hike the Pacific Crest Trail by herself for 1,100 miles. It's a showstopping performance from an actress who keeps springing surprises. With the help of a scrappy script by Nick Hornby (About a Boy) that allows bursts of humor to break through the darkness, Witherspoon cuts to the bruised core of Cheryl's heart, rattling between desperation and determination. Under the keen-eyed direction of Jean-Marc Vallée (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild emerges as an exciting, elemental adventure that takes you places you don't see coming.  - Peter Travers, RollingStone 

9:30pm

A Most Violent Year

2014, USA, 124 MINS, 14A

Dir: J.C. Chandor
Starring: Jessica Chastain, Oscar Isaac

Oscar Isaac’s deep brown orbs reveal everything and nothing about his character Abel Morales. He’s an ambitious heating-oil entrepreneur in the crime-ridden New York of 1981, a place and era familiar from the films of Sidney Lumet, whose influence is seen and felt.

Abel is trying to close a major waterfront land deal that will give his firm, Standard Heating Oil, the edge in a cutthroat industry. But thugs connected to rival concerns keep attacking his drivers and salesmen and stealing his oil. This threatens his livelihood — and maybe also his life.

Chandor and cinematographer Bradford Young bring an assured sense of menace to the film, carefully raising the stakes with visual cues and clues.

Sunday March 15, 2015

1:45pm

Paddington

2014, UK, 95 MINS, G

Dir: Paul King
Starring: Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins

“Paddington,” a live-action/CGI-animated take on the tales of the beloved stuffed bear, pulls off a pretty tricky balancing act. It manages to be both old-fashioned and high-tech. It remains faithful to the character’s roots while also placing him firmly within a contemporary setting. It’s charmingly funny and shamelessly punny. (This is a movie in which the GPS instructs a driver to bear left during a car chase, and whaddya know – there’s a bear on the left.)

King’s film offers an origin story for the marmalade-obsessed bear from Michael Bond’s children’s books. When we first meet Paddington (voiced sweetly by Ben Whishaw with some light touches reminiscent of Robin Williams), he’s living in Darkest Peru with his aunt and uncle (Imelda Staunton and Michael Gambon). Years earlier, a British explorer had visited and was amazed to discover the existence of such brilliant, talking bears. Now, when it comes time for young Paddington to make his own way in the world, his aunt sends him to London, since the explorer promised that they’d always be welcome there.

Christy Lemire, rogerebert.com

3:45pm

Mr. Turner

2014, UK, 149 MINS, 14A

Dir: Mike Leigh
Starring: Timothy Spall, Dorothy Atkinson

Keen observer Mike Leigh brings his hawk’s eye to a vibrant rendering of J.M.W. Turner, the celebrated British “painter of light.” The artist is played to perfection by Timothy Spall, who spent two years preparing for the role and who won Best Actor for his efforts at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Spall portrays Turner as a grunting vulgarian. That dismissive grunt is key to his portrayal of a man whose appreciation of life lies entirely on the canvas, which he assaults with a fury of colour and brush strokes.

The film covers the last 25 of Turner’s adult years, finding him restless in London upon his return from overseas travels (including a painterly sojourn to Holland gloriously glimpsed at the outset). It’s only when he travels to the seaside town of Margate, where he roamed as a lad, that his perpetual distemper lifts. There he meets Mrs. Booth (Marion Bailey), the keeper of the inn where he stays, who is curious about this odd and obsessive man. Mrs. Booth finds the man within the ogre.


Peter Howell, The Star



7:00pm

Wild

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 18A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Reese Witherspoon, Laura Dern, Gaby Hoffmann

Producer-star Reese Witherspoon kicks out the jams in Wild. She's a live wire as Cheryl Strayed, a sleep-around heroin dabbler who, in 1995, found a unique way to deal with her painful lack of self-esteem and the death of her mother (a wonderfully funny and touching Laura Dern): hike the Pacific Crest Trail by herself for 1,100 miles. It's a showstopping performance from an actress who keeps springing surprises. With the help of a scrappy script by Nick Hornby (About a Boy) that allows bursts of humor to break through the darkness, Witherspoon cuts to the bruised core of Cheryl's heart, rattling between desperation and determination. Under the keen-eyed direction of Jean-Marc Vallée (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild emerges as an exciting, elemental adventure that takes you places you don't see coming.  - Peter Travers, RollingStone 

9:30pm

A Most Violent Year

2014, USA, 124 MINS, 14A

Dir: J.C. Chandor
Starring: Jessica Chastain, Oscar Isaac

Oscar Isaac’s deep brown orbs reveal everything and nothing about his character Abel Morales. He’s an ambitious heating-oil entrepreneur in the crime-ridden New York of 1981, a place and era familiar from the films of Sidney Lumet, whose influence is seen and felt.

Abel is trying to close a major waterfront land deal that will give his firm, Standard Heating Oil, the edge in a cutthroat industry. But thugs connected to rival concerns keep attacking his drivers and salesmen and stealing his oil. This threatens his livelihood — and maybe also his life.

Chandor and cinematographer Bradford Young bring an assured sense of menace to the film, carefully raising the stakes with visual cues and clues.

Monday March 16, 2015

2:00pm

Paddington

2014, UK, 95 MINS, G

Dir: Paul King
Starring: Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins

“Paddington,” a live-action/CGI-animated take on the tales of the beloved stuffed bear, pulls off a pretty tricky balancing act. It manages to be both old-fashioned and high-tech. It remains faithful to the character’s roots while also placing him firmly within a contemporary setting. It’s charmingly funny and shamelessly punny. (This is a movie in which the GPS instructs a driver to bear left during a car chase, and whaddya know – there’s a bear on the left.)

King’s film offers an origin story for the marmalade-obsessed bear from Michael Bond’s children’s books. When we first meet Paddington (voiced sweetly by Ben Whishaw with some light touches reminiscent of Robin Williams), he’s living in Darkest Peru with his aunt and uncle (Imelda Staunton and Michael Gambon). Years earlier, a British explorer had visited and was amazed to discover the existence of such brilliant, talking bears. Now, when it comes time for young Paddington to make his own way in the world, his aunt sends him to London, since the explorer promised that they’d always be welcome there.

Christy Lemire, rogerebert.com

4:00pm

3D Screening

Big Hero 6 3D

2014, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: Don Hall, Chris Williams
Starring: Ryan Potter, Jamie Chung

Big Hero 6 transports us to the world of “San Fransokyo,” an east-meets-west futuristic city where young Hiro Hamada (Ryan Potter) and his big brother Tadashi (Daniel Henney) spend their days (and nights) inventing advanced robotics. However, where Tadashi works on robots that can help better the world, Hiro squanders his gift hustling for cash in the underground robot fighting circuit. Things change when Tadashi finally manages to inspire Hiro towards a greater goal: attending the robotics university where Tadashi and his four friends (Honey Lemon, Go Go, Wasabi and Fred) hatch brilliant new tech designs in their nerd lab think-tank.

Big Hero 6 combines Disney wonder and charm with Marvel awe and action to deliver a film that exhibits the best of both studios. This film takes an obscure (and strange) comic book and transforms it into something fun and refreshingly different, with loads of mainstream appeal. That’s no small accomplishment.

7:00pm

Red Army

2014, Russia, 85 MINS, PG

Dir: Gabe Polsky
Starring: Vyacheslav Fetisov, Scotty Bowman

In answer to Al Michaels’s rhetorical question and iconic exclamation at Lake Placid in 1980, no, the Soviet hockey machine did not believe in miracles. The Soviet hockey machine believed in not being embarrassed by a ragtag collection of U.S. players for an Olympic gold medal ever again, and so the Soviet hockey machine went all boot camp after the Americans’ unlikely Miracle on Ice victory – ruthlessly training its players to superhuman fitness levels and hyper-dedication extremes. Believe in miracles? The Soviet hockey machine believed in the whip, uniformity and puck-based propaganda.

Red Army is Gabe Polsky’s compelling but skewed documentary on the Soviets’ less-than-sporting mentality when it came to the international skating and puck-shooting game. Though the post-Placid glory years – and team captain Viacheslav (Slava) Fetisov – are the focus, ostensibly the film overviews the Soviets’ shinny history from the 1950s into the early 1990s, with special emphasis on sport as a propaganda tool during an era when us-against-them passions ran very, very hot.

Brad Wheeler, The Globe and Mail

9:00pm

Wild

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 18A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Reese Witherspoon, Laura Dern, Gaby Hoffmann

Producer-star Reese Witherspoon kicks out the jams in Wild. She's a live wire as Cheryl Strayed, a sleep-around heroin dabbler who, in 1995, found a unique way to deal with her painful lack of self-esteem and the death of her mother (a wonderfully funny and touching Laura Dern): hike the Pacific Crest Trail by herself for 1,100 miles. It's a showstopping performance from an actress who keeps springing surprises. With the help of a scrappy script by Nick Hornby (About a Boy) that allows bursts of humor to break through the darkness, Witherspoon cuts to the bruised core of Cheryl's heart, rattling between desperation and determination. Under the keen-eyed direction of Jean-Marc Vallée (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild emerges as an exciting, elemental adventure that takes you places you don't see coming.  - Peter Travers, RollingStone 

Tuesday March 17, 2015

2:00pm

Paddington

2014, UK, 95 MINS, G

Dir: Paul King
Starring: Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins

“Paddington,” a live-action/CGI-animated take on the tales of the beloved stuffed bear, pulls off a pretty tricky balancing act. It manages to be both old-fashioned and high-tech. It remains faithful to the character’s roots while also placing him firmly within a contemporary setting. It’s charmingly funny and shamelessly punny. (This is a movie in which the GPS instructs a driver to bear left during a car chase, and whaddya know – there’s a bear on the left.)

King’s film offers an origin story for the marmalade-obsessed bear from Michael Bond’s children’s books. When we first meet Paddington (voiced sweetly by Ben Whishaw with some light touches reminiscent of Robin Williams), he’s living in Darkest Peru with his aunt and uncle (Imelda Staunton and Michael Gambon). Years earlier, a British explorer had visited and was amazed to discover the existence of such brilliant, talking bears. Now, when it comes time for young Paddington to make his own way in the world, his aunt sends him to London, since the explorer promised that they’d always be welcome there.

Christy Lemire, rogerebert.com

4:00pm

3D Screening

Big Hero 6 3D

2014, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: Don Hall, Chris Williams
Starring: Ryan Potter, Jamie Chung

Big Hero 6 transports us to the world of “San Fransokyo,” an east-meets-west futuristic city where young Hiro Hamada (Ryan Potter) and his big brother Tadashi (Daniel Henney) spend their days (and nights) inventing advanced robotics. However, where Tadashi works on robots that can help better the world, Hiro squanders his gift hustling for cash in the underground robot fighting circuit. Things change when Tadashi finally manages to inspire Hiro towards a greater goal: attending the robotics university where Tadashi and his four friends (Honey Lemon, Go Go, Wasabi and Fred) hatch brilliant new tech designs in their nerd lab think-tank.

Big Hero 6 combines Disney wonder and charm with Marvel awe and action to deliver a film that exhibits the best of both studios. This film takes an obscure (and strange) comic book and transforms it into something fun and refreshingly different, with loads of mainstream appeal. That’s no small accomplishment.

6:30pm

Mr. Turner

2014, UK, 149 MINS, 14A

Dir: Mike Leigh
Starring: Timothy Spall, Dorothy Atkinson

Keen observer Mike Leigh brings his hawk’s eye to a vibrant rendering of J.M.W. Turner, the celebrated British “painter of light.” The artist is played to perfection by Timothy Spall, who spent two years preparing for the role and who won Best Actor for his efforts at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Spall portrays Turner as a grunting vulgarian. That dismissive grunt is key to his portrayal of a man whose appreciation of life lies entirely on the canvas, which he assaults with a fury of colour and brush strokes.

The film covers the last 25 of Turner’s adult years, finding him restless in London upon his return from overseas travels (including a painterly sojourn to Holland gloriously glimpsed at the outset). It’s only when he travels to the seaside town of Margate, where he roamed as a lad, that his perpetual distemper lifts. There he meets Mrs. Booth (Marion Bailey), the keeper of the inn where he stays, who is curious about this odd and obsessive man. Mrs. Booth finds the man within the ogre.


Peter Howell, The Star



9:20pm

Red Army

2014, Russia, 85 MINS, PG

Dir: Gabe Polsky
Starring: Vyacheslav Fetisov, Scotty Bowman

In answer to Al Michaels’s rhetorical question and iconic exclamation at Lake Placid in 1980, no, the Soviet hockey machine did not believe in miracles. The Soviet hockey machine believed in not being embarrassed by a ragtag collection of U.S. players for an Olympic gold medal ever again, and so the Soviet hockey machine went all boot camp after the Americans’ unlikely Miracle on Ice victory – ruthlessly training its players to superhuman fitness levels and hyper-dedication extremes. Believe in miracles? The Soviet hockey machine believed in the whip, uniformity and puck-based propaganda.

Red Army is Gabe Polsky’s compelling but skewed documentary on the Soviets’ less-than-sporting mentality when it came to the international skating and puck-shooting game. Though the post-Placid glory years – and team captain Viacheslav (Slava) Fetisov – are the focus, ostensibly the film overviews the Soviets’ shinny history from the 1950s into the early 1990s, with special emphasis on sport as a propaganda tool during an era when us-against-them passions ran very, very hot.

Brad Wheeler, The Globe and Mail

Wednesday March 18, 2015

2:00pm

Paddington

2014, UK, 95 MINS, G

Dir: Paul King
Starring: Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins

“Paddington,” a live-action/CGI-animated take on the tales of the beloved stuffed bear, pulls off a pretty tricky balancing act. It manages to be both old-fashioned and high-tech. It remains faithful to the character’s roots while also placing him firmly within a contemporary setting. It’s charmingly funny and shamelessly punny. (This is a movie in which the GPS instructs a driver to bear left during a car chase, and whaddya know – there’s a bear on the left.)

King’s film offers an origin story for the marmalade-obsessed bear from Michael Bond’s children’s books. When we first meet Paddington (voiced sweetly by Ben Whishaw with some light touches reminiscent of Robin Williams), he’s living in Darkest Peru with his aunt and uncle (Imelda Staunton and Michael Gambon). Years earlier, a British explorer had visited and was amazed to discover the existence of such brilliant, talking bears. Now, when it comes time for young Paddington to make his own way in the world, his aunt sends him to London, since the explorer promised that they’d always be welcome there.

Christy Lemire, rogerebert.com

4:00pm

3D Screening

The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies 3D

2014, USA, 144 MINS, PG

Dir: Peter Jackson
Starring: Ian McKellen, Martin Freeman

The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies brings the Middle-earth Saga to a favorable conclusion. 

Picking up where The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug ends, we actually see said desolation take place - but it quickly gives way to the final film's main narrative thrust. With the kingdoms of Man and Elves trying to settle the promises that Thorin Oakenshield (Richard Armitage), made in the previous installments, the newly crowned dwarf king opts to let the kingdoms fend for themselves. He has his gold, and as soon as he finds the Arkenstone, he'll be content to just lord over the mountain. Of course, the Orc armies, lead by Azog The Defiler, have other plans for the newly reclaimed territory. 

The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies is the undeniably the best of the trilogy, as it's not only a film in perpetual motion, but it's also a lean and quick experience that packs every moment with purpose. - See more at: http://www.cinemablend.com/reviews/Hobbit-Battle-Five-Armies-66404.html#sthash.hedPZ4vB.dpuf

7:00pm

Wild

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 18A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Reese Witherspoon, Laura Dern, Gaby Hoffmann

Producer-star Reese Witherspoon kicks out the jams in Wild. She's a live wire as Cheryl Strayed, a sleep-around heroin dabbler who, in 1995, found a unique way to deal with her painful lack of self-esteem and the death of her mother (a wonderfully funny and touching Laura Dern): hike the Pacific Crest Trail by herself for 1,100 miles. It's a showstopping performance from an actress who keeps springing surprises. With the help of a scrappy script by Nick Hornby (About a Boy) that allows bursts of humor to break through the darkness, Witherspoon cuts to the bruised core of Cheryl's heart, rattling between desperation and determination. Under the keen-eyed direction of Jean-Marc Vallée (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild emerges as an exciting, elemental adventure that takes you places you don't see coming.  - Peter Travers, RollingStone 

9:20pm

Mr. Turner

2014, UK, 149 MINS, 14A

Dir: Mike Leigh
Starring: Timothy Spall, Dorothy Atkinson

Keen observer Mike Leigh brings his hawk’s eye to a vibrant rendering of J.M.W. Turner, the celebrated British “painter of light.” The artist is played to perfection by Timothy Spall, who spent two years preparing for the role and who won Best Actor for his efforts at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Spall portrays Turner as a grunting vulgarian. That dismissive grunt is key to his portrayal of a man whose appreciation of life lies entirely on the canvas, which he assaults with a fury of colour and brush strokes.

The film covers the last 25 of Turner’s adult years, finding him restless in London upon his return from overseas travels (including a painterly sojourn to Holland gloriously glimpsed at the outset). It’s only when he travels to the seaside town of Margate, where he roamed as a lad, that his perpetual distemper lifts. There he meets Mrs. Booth (Marion Bailey), the keeper of the inn where he stays, who is curious about this odd and obsessive man. Mrs. Booth finds the man within the ogre.


Peter Howell, The Star



Thursday March 19, 2015

1:30pm

Paddington

2014, UK, 95 MINS, G

Dir: Paul King
Starring: Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins

“Paddington,” a live-action/CGI-animated take on the tales of the beloved stuffed bear, pulls off a pretty tricky balancing act. It manages to be both old-fashioned and high-tech. It remains faithful to the character’s roots while also placing him firmly within a contemporary setting. It’s charmingly funny and shamelessly punny. (This is a movie in which the GPS instructs a driver to bear left during a car chase, and whaddya know – there’s a bear on the left.)

King’s film offers an origin story for the marmalade-obsessed bear from Michael Bond’s children’s books. When we first meet Paddington (voiced sweetly by Ben Whishaw with some light touches reminiscent of Robin Williams), he’s living in Darkest Peru with his aunt and uncle (Imelda Staunton and Michael Gambon). Years earlier, a British explorer had visited and was amazed to discover the existence of such brilliant, talking bears. Now, when it comes time for young Paddington to make his own way in the world, his aunt sends him to London, since the explorer promised that they’d always be welcome there.

Christy Lemire, rogerebert.com

3:30pm

3D Screening

The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies 3D

2014, USA, 144 MINS, PG

Dir: Peter Jackson
Starring: Ian McKellen, Martin Freeman

The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies brings the Middle-earth Saga to a favorable conclusion. 

Picking up where The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug ends, we actually see said desolation take place - but it quickly gives way to the final film's main narrative thrust. With the kingdoms of Man and Elves trying to settle the promises that Thorin Oakenshield (Richard Armitage), made in the previous installments, the newly crowned dwarf king opts to let the kingdoms fend for themselves. He has his gold, and as soon as he finds the Arkenstone, he'll be content to just lord over the mountain. Of course, the Orc armies, lead by Azog The Defiler, have other plans for the newly reclaimed territory. 

The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies is the undeniably the best of the trilogy, as it's not only a film in perpetual motion, but it's also a lean and quick experience that packs every moment with purpose. - See more at: http://www.cinemablend.com/reviews/Hobbit-Battle-Five-Armies-66404.html#sthash.hedPZ4vB.dpuf

6:30pm

Mr. Turner

2014, UK, 149 MINS, 14A

Dir: Mike Leigh
Starring: Timothy Spall, Dorothy Atkinson

Keen observer Mike Leigh brings his hawk’s eye to a vibrant rendering of J.M.W. Turner, the celebrated British “painter of light.” The artist is played to perfection by Timothy Spall, who spent two years preparing for the role and who won Best Actor for his efforts at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Spall portrays Turner as a grunting vulgarian. That dismissive grunt is key to his portrayal of a man whose appreciation of life lies entirely on the canvas, which he assaults with a fury of colour and brush strokes.

The film covers the last 25 of Turner’s adult years, finding him restless in London upon his return from overseas travels (including a painterly sojourn to Holland gloriously glimpsed at the outset). It’s only when he travels to the seaside town of Margate, where he roamed as a lad, that his perpetual distemper lifts. There he meets Mrs. Booth (Marion Bailey), the keeper of the inn where he stays, who is curious about this odd and obsessive man. Mrs. Booth finds the man within the ogre.


Peter Howell, The Star



9:20pm

Wild

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 18A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Reese Witherspoon, Laura Dern, Gaby Hoffmann

Producer-star Reese Witherspoon kicks out the jams in Wild. She's a live wire as Cheryl Strayed, a sleep-around heroin dabbler who, in 1995, found a unique way to deal with her painful lack of self-esteem and the death of her mother (a wonderfully funny and touching Laura Dern): hike the Pacific Crest Trail by herself for 1,100 miles. It's a showstopping performance from an actress who keeps springing surprises. With the help of a scrappy script by Nick Hornby (About a Boy) that allows bursts of humor to break through the darkness, Witherspoon cuts to the bruised core of Cheryl's heart, rattling between desperation and determination. Under the keen-eyed direction of Jean-Marc Vallée (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild emerges as an exciting, elemental adventure that takes you places you don't see coming.  - Peter Travers, RollingStone 

Friday March 20, 2015

2:00pm

Paddington

2014, UK, 95 MINS, G

Dir: Paul King
Starring: Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins

“Paddington,” a live-action/CGI-animated take on the tales of the beloved stuffed bear, pulls off a pretty tricky balancing act. It manages to be both old-fashioned and high-tech. It remains faithful to the character’s roots while also placing him firmly within a contemporary setting. It’s charmingly funny and shamelessly punny. (This is a movie in which the GPS instructs a driver to bear left during a car chase, and whaddya know – there’s a bear on the left.)

King’s film offers an origin story for the marmalade-obsessed bear from Michael Bond’s children’s books. When we first meet Paddington (voiced sweetly by Ben Whishaw with some light touches reminiscent of Robin Williams), he’s living in Darkest Peru with his aunt and uncle (Imelda Staunton and Michael Gambon). Years earlier, a British explorer had visited and was amazed to discover the existence of such brilliant, talking bears. Now, when it comes time for young Paddington to make his own way in the world, his aunt sends him to London, since the explorer promised that they’d always be welcome there.

Christy Lemire, rogerebert.com

4:00pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



7:00pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



9:30pm

American Sniper

2014, USA, 132 MINS, 14A

Dir: Clint Eastwood
Starring: Bradley Cooper, Sienna Miller

In American Sniper, the 34th film to be directed by Clint Eastwood, Chris Kyle (Bradley Cooper) rarely has a clear view of the field of battle. As perhaps the most accomplished marksman in US military history, he’s invariably lying on his belly on a dust-blown rooftop, staring down a telescopic sight, methodically picking off one enemy after the next. His experience of war is an endless extreme close-up.

Between tours, Kyle tries to decompress back at home in Texas with his wife Taya, who’s terrifically played by Sienna Miller. Cooper and Miller play them with a clarity and rawness that keep the R&R sequences from feeling like dramatic down-time.

Each scene is built as solidly and methodically as a chest of drawers, with no confusion over where the pieces fit. Panic has never been Eastwood’s style, and even during the climactic shoot-out, where a sandstorm engulfs both sides in a symbolic fog of war, the camera remains perceptive and alert.

Robbie Collin, The Telegraph

Saturday March 21, 2015

1:30pm

3D Screening

The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies 3D

2014, USA, 144 MINS, PG

Dir: Peter Jackson
Starring: Ian McKellen, Martin Freeman

The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies brings the Middle-earth Saga to a favorable conclusion. 

Picking up where The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug ends, we actually see said desolation take place - but it quickly gives way to the final film's main narrative thrust. With the kingdoms of Man and Elves trying to settle the promises that Thorin Oakenshield (Richard Armitage), made in the previous installments, the newly crowned dwarf king opts to let the kingdoms fend for themselves. He has his gold, and as soon as he finds the Arkenstone, he'll be content to just lord over the mountain. Of course, the Orc armies, lead by Azog The Defiler, have other plans for the newly reclaimed territory. 

The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies is the undeniably the best of the trilogy, as it's not only a film in perpetual motion, but it's also a lean and quick experience that packs every moment with purpose. - See more at: http://www.cinemablend.com/reviews/Hobbit-Battle-Five-Armies-66404.html#sthash.hedPZ4vB.dpuf

4:15pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



7:00pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



9:30pm

American Sniper

2014, USA, 132 MINS, 14A

Dir: Clint Eastwood
Starring: Bradley Cooper, Sienna Miller

In American Sniper, the 34th film to be directed by Clint Eastwood, Chris Kyle (Bradley Cooper) rarely has a clear view of the field of battle. As perhaps the most accomplished marksman in US military history, he’s invariably lying on his belly on a dust-blown rooftop, staring down a telescopic sight, methodically picking off one enemy after the next. His experience of war is an endless extreme close-up.

Between tours, Kyle tries to decompress back at home in Texas with his wife Taya, who’s terrifically played by Sienna Miller. Cooper and Miller play them with a clarity and rawness that keep the R&R sequences from feeling like dramatic down-time.

Each scene is built as solidly and methodically as a chest of drawers, with no confusion over where the pieces fit. Panic has never been Eastwood’s style, and even during the climactic shoot-out, where a sandstorm engulfs both sides in a symbolic fog of war, the camera remains perceptive and alert.

Robbie Collin, The Telegraph

Sunday March 22, 2015

1:30pm

3D Screening

The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies 3D

2014, USA, 144 MINS, PG

Dir: Peter Jackson
Starring: Ian McKellen, Martin Freeman

The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies brings the Middle-earth Saga to a favorable conclusion. 

Picking up where The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug ends, we actually see said desolation take place - but it quickly gives way to the final film's main narrative thrust. With the kingdoms of Man and Elves trying to settle the promises that Thorin Oakenshield (Richard Armitage), made in the previous installments, the newly crowned dwarf king opts to let the kingdoms fend for themselves. He has his gold, and as soon as he finds the Arkenstone, he'll be content to just lord over the mountain. Of course, the Orc armies, lead by Azog The Defiler, have other plans for the newly reclaimed territory. 

The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies is the undeniably the best of the trilogy, as it's not only a film in perpetual motion, but it's also a lean and quick experience that packs every moment with purpose. - See more at: http://www.cinemablend.com/reviews/Hobbit-Battle-Five-Armies-66404.html#sthash.hedPZ4vB.dpuf

4:15pm

American Sniper

2014, USA, 132 MINS, 14A

Dir: Clint Eastwood
Starring: Bradley Cooper, Sienna Miller

In American Sniper, the 34th film to be directed by Clint Eastwood, Chris Kyle (Bradley Cooper) rarely has a clear view of the field of battle. As perhaps the most accomplished marksman in US military history, he’s invariably lying on his belly on a dust-blown rooftop, staring down a telescopic sight, methodically picking off one enemy after the next. His experience of war is an endless extreme close-up.

Between tours, Kyle tries to decompress back at home in Texas with his wife Taya, who’s terrifically played by Sienna Miller. Cooper and Miller play them with a clarity and rawness that keep the R&R sequences from feeling like dramatic down-time.

Each scene is built as solidly and methodically as a chest of drawers, with no confusion over where the pieces fit. Panic has never been Eastwood’s style, and even during the climactic shoot-out, where a sandstorm engulfs both sides in a symbolic fog of war, the camera remains perceptive and alert.

Robbie Collin, The Telegraph

7:00pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



9:20pm

American Sniper

2014, USA, 132 MINS, 14A

Dir: Clint Eastwood
Starring: Bradley Cooper, Sienna Miller

In American Sniper, the 34th film to be directed by Clint Eastwood, Chris Kyle (Bradley Cooper) rarely has a clear view of the field of battle. As perhaps the most accomplished marksman in US military history, he’s invariably lying on his belly on a dust-blown rooftop, staring down a telescopic sight, methodically picking off one enemy after the next. His experience of war is an endless extreme close-up.

Between tours, Kyle tries to decompress back at home in Texas with his wife Taya, who’s terrifically played by Sienna Miller. Cooper and Miller play them with a clarity and rawness that keep the R&R sequences from feeling like dramatic down-time.

Each scene is built as solidly and methodically as a chest of drawers, with no confusion over where the pieces fit. Panic has never been Eastwood’s style, and even during the climactic shoot-out, where a sandstorm engulfs both sides in a symbolic fog of war, the camera remains perceptive and alert.

Robbie Collin, The Telegraph

Monday March 23, 2015

7:00pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



9:20pm

American Sniper

2014, USA, 132 MINS, 14A

Dir: Clint Eastwood
Starring: Bradley Cooper, Sienna Miller

In American Sniper, the 34th film to be directed by Clint Eastwood, Chris Kyle (Bradley Cooper) rarely has a clear view of the field of battle. As perhaps the most accomplished marksman in US military history, he’s invariably lying on his belly on a dust-blown rooftop, staring down a telescopic sight, methodically picking off one enemy after the next. His experience of war is an endless extreme close-up.

Between tours, Kyle tries to decompress back at home in Texas with his wife Taya, who’s terrifically played by Sienna Miller. Cooper and Miller play them with a clarity and rawness that keep the R&R sequences from feeling like dramatic down-time.

Each scene is built as solidly and methodically as a chest of drawers, with no confusion over where the pieces fit. Panic has never been Eastwood’s style, and even during the climactic shoot-out, where a sandstorm engulfs both sides in a symbolic fog of war, the camera remains perceptive and alert.

Robbie Collin, The Telegraph

Tuesday March 24, 2015

6:45pm

American Sniper

2014, USA, 132 MINS, 14A

Dir: Clint Eastwood
Starring: Bradley Cooper, Sienna Miller

In American Sniper, the 34th film to be directed by Clint Eastwood, Chris Kyle (Bradley Cooper) rarely has a clear view of the field of battle. As perhaps the most accomplished marksman in US military history, he’s invariably lying on his belly on a dust-blown rooftop, staring down a telescopic sight, methodically picking off one enemy after the next. His experience of war is an endless extreme close-up.

Between tours, Kyle tries to decompress back at home in Texas with his wife Taya, who’s terrifically played by Sienna Miller. Cooper and Miller play them with a clarity and rawness that keep the R&R sequences from feeling like dramatic down-time.

Each scene is built as solidly and methodically as a chest of drawers, with no confusion over where the pieces fit. Panic has never been Eastwood’s style, and even during the climactic shoot-out, where a sandstorm engulfs both sides in a symbolic fog of war, the camera remains perceptive and alert.

Robbie Collin, The Telegraph

9:20pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



Wednesday March 25, 2015

7:00pm

The Wrecking Crew

2015, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: John Sayles

To the must-see list of pop music documentaries – including Standing in the Shadows of Motown and 20 Feet From Stardom – you can add The Wrecking Crew.

The untold story of the studio performers behind almost every West Coast hit of the ‘60s and ‘70s, The Wrecking Crew is at once an eye-popping barrage of archival footage, and a revealing look at the role session players played inventing now-familiar sounds (including The Beach Boys, The Byrds and The Mamas And The Papas).

Kim Slotex, Toronto Sun



9:15pm

Leviathan

2014, Russia, 140 MINS, 14A

Dir: Andrey Zvyagintsev
Starring: Aleksey Serebryakov, Elena Lyadova

The great trial of Job is reborn in this magnificent Russian movie, first seen at Cannes this year. Leviathan is a tragic drama, compelling in its moral seriousness, with a severity and force that escalate into a terrible, annihilating sort of grandeur. Zvyagintsev combines an Old Testament fable with something like Tarkovsky’s Sacrifice; it also has something of Elia Kazan’s On the Waterfront or Robert Rossen’s municipal graft classic All the King’s Men. Kolia (Alexey Serebriakov) is a car mechanic with a modest property on prime real estate: a beautiful spot on the Barents Sea, but a crooked mayor called Vadim – a wonderful performance from Roman Madyanov, looking something like Boris Yeltsin – wants this land, and hits Kolia with a compulsory purchase order. Kolia’s old army buddy Dimitri (Vladimir Vdovichenkov), now a slick Moscow lawyer, has an incriminating file on Vadim that he promises will induce Vadim to back down, but attempting to blackmail Russia’s well-connected gangster class is fraught with danger. Leviathan shows a world governed by drunken, depressed men: everyone is drowning in vodka and despair. Kolia is at the centre of a perfect storm of poisoned destiny, at the focal point of smart lawyers, aggressive politicians and arrogant priests. The title refers to Hobbes’s Leviathan, the classic work about liberty and the state, and also the whale. 

Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian

Thursday March 26, 2015

6:45pm

Leviathan

2014, Russia, 140 MINS, 14A

Dir: Andrey Zvyagintsev
Starring: Aleksey Serebryakov, Elena Lyadova

The great trial of Job is reborn in this magnificent Russian movie, first seen at Cannes this year. Leviathan is a tragic drama, compelling in its moral seriousness, with a severity and force that escalate into a terrible, annihilating sort of grandeur. Zvyagintsev combines an Old Testament fable with something like Tarkovsky’s Sacrifice; it also has something of Elia Kazan’s On the Waterfront or Robert Rossen’s municipal graft classic All the King’s Men. Kolia (Alexey Serebriakov) is a car mechanic with a modest property on prime real estate: a beautiful spot on the Barents Sea, but a crooked mayor called Vadim – a wonderful performance from Roman Madyanov, looking something like Boris Yeltsin – wants this land, and hits Kolia with a compulsory purchase order. Kolia’s old army buddy Dimitri (Vladimir Vdovichenkov), now a slick Moscow lawyer, has an incriminating file on Vadim that he promises will induce Vadim to back down, but attempting to blackmail Russia’s well-connected gangster class is fraught with danger. Leviathan shows a world governed by drunken, depressed men: everyone is drowning in vodka and despair. Kolia is at the centre of a perfect storm of poisoned destiny, at the focal point of smart lawyers, aggressive politicians and arrogant priests. The title refers to Hobbes’s Leviathan, the classic work about liberty and the state, and also the whale. 

Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian

9:30pm

The Wrecking Crew

2015, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: John Sayles

To the must-see list of pop music documentaries – including Standing in the Shadows of Motown and 20 Feet From Stardom – you can add The Wrecking Crew.

The untold story of the studio performers behind almost every West Coast hit of the ‘60s and ‘70s, The Wrecking Crew is at once an eye-popping barrage of archival footage, and a revealing look at the role session players played inventing now-familiar sounds (including The Beach Boys, The Byrds and The Mamas And The Papas).

Kim Slotex, Toronto Sun



Friday March 27, 2015

7:00pm

Still Alice

2015, USA, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Wash Westmoreland, Richard Glatzer
Starring: Julianne Moore, Alec Baldwin, Kristen Stewart

Alice Howland, the Columbia University linguistics professor played by Julianne Moore in Still Alice, is on her daily run, jogging the Upper West Side, a familiar route and routine.

In the middle of the campus where she has long been teaching, she stops for a minute, a lost look in her eyes. Suddenly, scarily, nothing seems familiar. Lightheadedness? Stress? The flu coming on?

Or is this a sign of something more serious, devastating?

Unfolding in incremental passages, and shot through with piercing detail, Still Alice is the sad, beautifully realized story of a victim of early-onset Alzheimer's and how the disease that works like an eraser across a vast canvas of memory - progressively wiping it clean - changes a life and the lives of the loved ones and colleagues around her. - Steven Rea

9:10pm

Kingsman: The Secret Service

2014, UK/USA, 129 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Facey
Starring: Michael Caine, Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson

The movie follows Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Egerton), a troubled British youth whose life seems to been headed nowhere fast. This changes when Harry “Agent Galahad” (Firth) recruits and trains him to be a member of an international intelligence organization called the Kingsman.  Together they must stop a world domination plot by insane billionaire Richmond Valentine (Jackson).

The action, cinematography, and design all help this film stand out both as a love letter and as a solo film. The action is fast paced and memorable, with the camera following closely behind the actors as they pull off extremely complex, long, and gleefully over the top fight scenes. The addition of numerous spy gadgets, like grenade cigarette lighters and shotgun umbrellas serve as the final piece needed to make this film feel like a true spy movie. It’s also an unbelievably and genuinely funny film.

 

Adam Facey, The Muse

Saturday March 28, 2015

2:00pm

3D Screening

The Spongebob Movie: Fish Out of Water 3D

2015, USA, 93 MINS, G

Dir: Paul Tibbitt
Starring: Antonio Banderas, Tom Kenny

A framing device introduces live-action Antonio Banderas as a pirate snatching a book about SpongeBob’s home village of Bikini Bottom. SpongeBob, you may recall, works for Mr Krabs at Krusty Krab making Krabby Patties. Plankton, a tiny bad guy, has long wanted the secret formula for the Krabby Patties, and he’s finally cooked up a way to snatch it from the Krusty Krab vault. An unforeseen development causes the recipe to disappear, and now SpongeBob and Plankton must join forces to find it, because the lack of Krabby Patties has sent Bikini Bottom into chaos. 

 

The Guardian, Jordan Hoffman



3:00pm

Private Rental

0 MINS, G

7:00pm

Still Alice

2015, USA, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Wash Westmoreland, Richard Glatzer
Starring: Julianne Moore, Alec Baldwin, Kristen Stewart

Alice Howland, the Columbia University linguistics professor played by Julianne Moore in Still Alice, is on her daily run, jogging the Upper West Side, a familiar route and routine.

In the middle of the campus where she has long been teaching, she stops for a minute, a lost look in her eyes. Suddenly, scarily, nothing seems familiar. Lightheadedness? Stress? The flu coming on?

Or is this a sign of something more serious, devastating?

Unfolding in incremental passages, and shot through with piercing detail, Still Alice is the sad, beautifully realized story of a victim of early-onset Alzheimer's and how the disease that works like an eraser across a vast canvas of memory - progressively wiping it clean - changes a life and the lives of the loved ones and colleagues around her. - Steven Rea

9:10pm

Kingsman: The Secret Service

2014, UK/USA, 129 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Facey
Starring: Michael Caine, Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson

The movie follows Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Egerton), a troubled British youth whose life seems to been headed nowhere fast. This changes when Harry “Agent Galahad” (Firth) recruits and trains him to be a member of an international intelligence organization called the Kingsman.  Together they must stop a world domination plot by insane billionaire Richmond Valentine (Jackson).

The action, cinematography, and design all help this film stand out both as a love letter and as a solo film. The action is fast paced and memorable, with the camera following closely behind the actors as they pull off extremely complex, long, and gleefully over the top fight scenes. The addition of numerous spy gadgets, like grenade cigarette lighters and shotgun umbrellas serve as the final piece needed to make this film feel like a true spy movie. It’s also an unbelievably and genuinely funny film.

 

Adam Facey, The Muse

Sunday March 29, 2015

2:00pm

3D Screening

The Spongebob Movie: Fish Out of Water 3D

2015, USA, 93 MINS, G

Dir: Paul Tibbitt
Starring: Antonio Banderas, Tom Kenny

A framing device introduces live-action Antonio Banderas as a pirate snatching a book about SpongeBob’s home village of Bikini Bottom. SpongeBob, you may recall, works for Mr Krabs at Krusty Krab making Krabby Patties. Plankton, a tiny bad guy, has long wanted the secret formula for the Krabby Patties, and he’s finally cooked up a way to snatch it from the Krusty Krab vault. An unforeseen development causes the recipe to disappear, and now SpongeBob and Plankton must join forces to find it, because the lack of Krabby Patties has sent Bikini Bottom into chaos. 

 

The Guardian, Jordan Hoffman



4:00pm

Still Alice

2015, USA, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Wash Westmoreland, Richard Glatzer
Starring: Julianne Moore, Alec Baldwin, Kristen Stewart

Alice Howland, the Columbia University linguistics professor played by Julianne Moore in Still Alice, is on her daily run, jogging the Upper West Side, a familiar route and routine.

In the middle of the campus where she has long been teaching, she stops for a minute, a lost look in her eyes. Suddenly, scarily, nothing seems familiar. Lightheadedness? Stress? The flu coming on?

Or is this a sign of something more serious, devastating?

Unfolding in incremental passages, and shot through with piercing detail, Still Alice is the sad, beautifully realized story of a victim of early-onset Alzheimer's and how the disease that works like an eraser across a vast canvas of memory - progressively wiping it clean - changes a life and the lives of the loved ones and colleagues around her. - Steven Rea

7:00pm

Still Alice

2015, USA, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Wash Westmoreland, Richard Glatzer
Starring: Julianne Moore, Alec Baldwin, Kristen Stewart

Alice Howland, the Columbia University linguistics professor played by Julianne Moore in Still Alice, is on her daily run, jogging the Upper West Side, a familiar route and routine.

In the middle of the campus where she has long been teaching, she stops for a minute, a lost look in her eyes. Suddenly, scarily, nothing seems familiar. Lightheadedness? Stress? The flu coming on?

Or is this a sign of something more serious, devastating?

Unfolding in incremental passages, and shot through with piercing detail, Still Alice is the sad, beautifully realized story of a victim of early-onset Alzheimer's and how the disease that works like an eraser across a vast canvas of memory - progressively wiping it clean - changes a life and the lives of the loved ones and colleagues around her. - Steven Rea

9:10pm

Kingsman: The Secret Service

2014, UK/USA, 129 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Facey
Starring: Michael Caine, Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson

The movie follows Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Egerton), a troubled British youth whose life seems to been headed nowhere fast. This changes when Harry “Agent Galahad” (Firth) recruits and trains him to be a member of an international intelligence organization called the Kingsman.  Together they must stop a world domination plot by insane billionaire Richmond Valentine (Jackson).

The action, cinematography, and design all help this film stand out both as a love letter and as a solo film. The action is fast paced and memorable, with the camera following closely behind the actors as they pull off extremely complex, long, and gleefully over the top fight scenes. The addition of numerous spy gadgets, like grenade cigarette lighters and shotgun umbrellas serve as the final piece needed to make this film feel like a true spy movie. It’s also an unbelievably and genuinely funny film.

 

Adam Facey, The Muse

Monday March 30, 2015

7:00pm

Still Alice

2015, USA, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Wash Westmoreland, Richard Glatzer
Starring: Julianne Moore, Alec Baldwin, Kristen Stewart

Alice Howland, the Columbia University linguistics professor played by Julianne Moore in Still Alice, is on her daily run, jogging the Upper West Side, a familiar route and routine.

In the middle of the campus where she has long been teaching, she stops for a minute, a lost look in her eyes. Suddenly, scarily, nothing seems familiar. Lightheadedness? Stress? The flu coming on?

Or is this a sign of something more serious, devastating?

Unfolding in incremental passages, and shot through with piercing detail, Still Alice is the sad, beautifully realized story of a victim of early-onset Alzheimer's and how the disease that works like an eraser across a vast canvas of memory - progressively wiping it clean - changes a life and the lives of the loved ones and colleagues around her. - Steven Rea

9:10pm

Kingsman: The Secret Service

2014, UK/USA, 129 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Facey
Starring: Michael Caine, Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson

The movie follows Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Egerton), a troubled British youth whose life seems to been headed nowhere fast. This changes when Harry “Agent Galahad” (Firth) recruits and trains him to be a member of an international intelligence organization called the Kingsman.  Together they must stop a world domination plot by insane billionaire Richmond Valentine (Jackson).

The action, cinematography, and design all help this film stand out both as a love letter and as a solo film. The action is fast paced and memorable, with the camera following closely behind the actors as they pull off extremely complex, long, and gleefully over the top fight scenes. The addition of numerous spy gadgets, like grenade cigarette lighters and shotgun umbrellas serve as the final piece needed to make this film feel like a true spy movie. It’s also an unbelievably and genuinely funny film.

 

Adam Facey, The Muse

Tuesday March 31, 2015

7:00pm

Kingsman: The Secret Service

2014, UK/USA, 129 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Facey
Starring: Michael Caine, Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson

The movie follows Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Egerton), a troubled British youth whose life seems to been headed nowhere fast. This changes when Harry “Agent Galahad” (Firth) recruits and trains him to be a member of an international intelligence organization called the Kingsman.  Together they must stop a world domination plot by insane billionaire Richmond Valentine (Jackson).

The action, cinematography, and design all help this film stand out both as a love letter and as a solo film. The action is fast paced and memorable, with the camera following closely behind the actors as they pull off extremely complex, long, and gleefully over the top fight scenes. The addition of numerous spy gadgets, like grenade cigarette lighters and shotgun umbrellas serve as the final piece needed to make this film feel like a true spy movie. It’s also an unbelievably and genuinely funny film.

 

Adam Facey, The Muse

9:30pm

Still Alice

2015, USA, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Wash Westmoreland, Richard Glatzer
Starring: Julianne Moore, Alec Baldwin, Kristen Stewart

Alice Howland, the Columbia University linguistics professor played by Julianne Moore in Still Alice, is on her daily run, jogging the Upper West Side, a familiar route and routine.

In the middle of the campus where she has long been teaching, she stops for a minute, a lost look in her eyes. Suddenly, scarily, nothing seems familiar. Lightheadedness? Stress? The flu coming on?

Or is this a sign of something more serious, devastating?

Unfolding in incremental passages, and shot through with piercing detail, Still Alice is the sad, beautifully realized story of a victim of early-onset Alzheimer's and how the disease that works like an eraser across a vast canvas of memory - progressively wiping it clean - changes a life and the lives of the loved ones and colleagues around her. - Steven Rea

February 2015

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March 2015

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