Now Playing

Today - Friday February 12, 2016

1:45pm

The Good Dinosaur 3D

2015, USA, 100 MINS, G

Dir: Peter Sohn
Starring: Frances McDormand, Raymond Ochoa, Jeffrey Wright

The Good Dinosaur tells the story of young Arlo (Raymond Ochoa), a timid Apatosaurus and the runt of his litter who goes astray from his family while chasing a young human wildling named Spot (Jack Bright) away from the corn stash.  Forced together in order to survive, Arlo and Spot soon form a deep bond founded on the knowledge that their differences are only skin deep but their similarities boundless.  Travelling in search of Arlo’s home on Clawtooth Mountain, they must find the courage to confront the daunting predators and boundless wilderness that awaits them. - Matthew Lowe, FilmInk

4:00pm

Private Rental

0 MINS, G

7:00pm

Carol

2015, USA, 119 MINS, 14A

Dir: Todd Haynes
Starring: Kyle Chandler, Sarah Paulson, Rooney Mara, Cate Blanchett, Jake Lacy

Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara shine in this tale of love in 1950’s New York from director Todd Haynes (Velvet Goldmine), based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith.

High-society woman Carol (Blanchett) is going through a divorce with husband Harge (Kyle Chandler), who is still struggling with an affair she had with their daughter’s godmother Abby (Sarah Paulson). After striking up a friendship with department store clerk Therese (Rooney Mara), the two women develop a physical relationship which – in the conservative American society of the time – jeopardises Carol’s joint custody of her child. - Alex Zane, The Sun



9:30pm

Spotlight

2015, USA, 128 MINS, 14A

Dir: Tom McCarthy
Starring: Rachel McAdams, Stanley Tucci, Mark Ruffalo, Liev Schreiber, Michael Keaton, John Slattery

Director Tom McCarthy assembles a dream cast for his powerful drama about the journalists who exposed pedophilia in the local Catholic Archdiocese of Boston.

Spotlight calmly and powerfully traces the work of a group of dogged Boston Globe journalists in 2001, who were determined to expose the systematic cover-up of child abuse in the local Catholic Church. It's the story behind the story, and it’s the film equivalent of reading an especially thrilling New Yorker article: ruthlessly detailed, precise and gripping but never brash or overemotional.

This is ‘All The President’s Men’ for the ongoing exposure of the horror of priestly paedophilia. Yet it’s a more subtle, damning film for implicating the media – as much as the church, the courts, the legal profession and other Boston institutions – in the systematic, wider cultural cover-up it describes. These journalists are good, hard-working and principled, but the film falls short of making them heroes, and crucially doesn’t allow media mechanics to over power the true nightmare of the real-life experiences behind their story. There are just enough testimonies here and encounters with victims to make the human side of the story crystal clear without losing focus on the bigger picture of establishment corruption. It’s that all-too-rare beast: a movie that’s both important and engrossing.- TimeOut



Saturday February 13, 2016

2:00pm

The Good Dinosaur 3D

2015, USA, 100 MINS, G

Dir: Peter Sohn
Starring: Frances McDormand, Raymond Ochoa, Jeffrey Wright

The Good Dinosaur tells the story of young Arlo (Raymond Ochoa), a timid Apatosaurus and the runt of his litter who goes astray from his family while chasing a young human wildling named Spot (Jack Bright) away from the corn stash.  Forced together in order to survive, Arlo and Spot soon form a deep bond founded on the knowledge that their differences are only skin deep but their similarities boundless.  Travelling in search of Arlo’s home on Clawtooth Mountain, they must find the courage to confront the daunting predators and boundless wilderness that awaits them. - Matthew Lowe, FilmInk

4:00pm

Spotlight

2015, USA, 128 MINS, 14A

Dir: Tom McCarthy
Starring: Rachel McAdams, Stanley Tucci, Mark Ruffalo, Liev Schreiber, Michael Keaton, John Slattery

Director Tom McCarthy assembles a dream cast for his powerful drama about the journalists who exposed pedophilia in the local Catholic Archdiocese of Boston.

Spotlight calmly and powerfully traces the work of a group of dogged Boston Globe journalists in 2001, who were determined to expose the systematic cover-up of child abuse in the local Catholic Church. It's the story behind the story, and it’s the film equivalent of reading an especially thrilling New Yorker article: ruthlessly detailed, precise and gripping but never brash or overemotional.

This is ‘All The President’s Men’ for the ongoing exposure of the horror of priestly paedophilia. Yet it’s a more subtle, damning film for implicating the media – as much as the church, the courts, the legal profession and other Boston institutions – in the systematic, wider cultural cover-up it describes. These journalists are good, hard-working and principled, but the film falls short of making them heroes, and crucially doesn’t allow media mechanics to over power the true nightmare of the real-life experiences behind their story. There are just enough testimonies here and encounters with victims to make the human side of the story crystal clear without losing focus on the bigger picture of establishment corruption. It’s that all-too-rare beast: a movie that’s both important and engrossing.- TimeOut



7:00pm

Carol

2015, USA, 119 MINS, 14A

Dir: Todd Haynes
Starring: Kyle Chandler, Sarah Paulson, Rooney Mara, Cate Blanchett, Jake Lacy

Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara shine in this tale of love in 1950’s New York from director Todd Haynes (Velvet Goldmine), based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith.

High-society woman Carol (Blanchett) is going through a divorce with husband Harge (Kyle Chandler), who is still struggling with an affair she had with their daughter’s godmother Abby (Sarah Paulson). After striking up a friendship with department store clerk Therese (Rooney Mara), the two women develop a physical relationship which – in the conservative American society of the time – jeopardises Carol’s joint custody of her child. - Alex Zane, The Sun



9:30pm

Spotlight

2015, USA, 128 MINS, 14A

Dir: Tom McCarthy
Starring: Rachel McAdams, Stanley Tucci, Mark Ruffalo, Liev Schreiber, Michael Keaton, John Slattery

Director Tom McCarthy assembles a dream cast for his powerful drama about the journalists who exposed pedophilia in the local Catholic Archdiocese of Boston.

Spotlight calmly and powerfully traces the work of a group of dogged Boston Globe journalists in 2001, who were determined to expose the systematic cover-up of child abuse in the local Catholic Church. It's the story behind the story, and it’s the film equivalent of reading an especially thrilling New Yorker article: ruthlessly detailed, precise and gripping but never brash or overemotional.

This is ‘All The President’s Men’ for the ongoing exposure of the horror of priestly paedophilia. Yet it’s a more subtle, damning film for implicating the media – as much as the church, the courts, the legal profession and other Boston institutions – in the systematic, wider cultural cover-up it describes. These journalists are good, hard-working and principled, but the film falls short of making them heroes, and crucially doesn’t allow media mechanics to over power the true nightmare of the real-life experiences behind their story. There are just enough testimonies here and encounters with victims to make the human side of the story crystal clear without losing focus on the bigger picture of establishment corruption. It’s that all-too-rare beast: a movie that’s both important and engrossing.- TimeOut



Sunday February 14, 2016

2:00pm

The Good Dinosaur 3D

2015, USA, 100 MINS, G

Dir: Peter Sohn
Starring: Frances McDormand, Raymond Ochoa, Jeffrey Wright

The Good Dinosaur tells the story of young Arlo (Raymond Ochoa), a timid Apatosaurus and the runt of his litter who goes astray from his family while chasing a young human wildling named Spot (Jack Bright) away from the corn stash.  Forced together in order to survive, Arlo and Spot soon form a deep bond founded on the knowledge that their differences are only skin deep but their similarities boundless.  Travelling in search of Arlo’s home on Clawtooth Mountain, they must find the courage to confront the daunting predators and boundless wilderness that awaits them. - Matthew Lowe, FilmInk

4:00pm

The Big Short

2015, USA, 130 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Mckay
Starring: Brad Pitt, Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Christian Bale, Marisa Tomei

It’s funny because it’s true. And it’s tragic and frightening for the same reason.

Adapted from Michael Lewis’s bestselling book The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine, Adam McKay’s stylized comedic take on the international banking collapse of 2007-08 nerds up Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Brad Pitt and an Oscar-baiting Christian Bale as real-life money-managing eccentrics who, independently, come to realize a market based on subprime loans is going to tank. They decide to short the booming housing market, basically betting on the collapse of the world’s economy.

McKay demystifies big-money jargon and esoterica in enterprising – disruptive? – fourth-wall-smashing ways, such as having shiny pop singer Selena Gomez cameo-explain synthetic collateralized debt obligations.

McKay made a co-name for himself with Will Ferrell collaborations includingAnchorman, but here he lets the outlandishness of a rigged, fairy-tale financial system create its own serious absurdity. The Big Short has a reckless, off-balance energy, with an ending that doesn’t really end the uncertainty: The collapse could happen again, no joke. - Globe & Mail





7:00pm

Carol

2015, USA, 119 MINS, 14A

Dir: Todd Haynes
Starring: Kyle Chandler, Sarah Paulson, Rooney Mara, Cate Blanchett, Jake Lacy

Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara shine in this tale of love in 1950’s New York from director Todd Haynes (Velvet Goldmine), based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith.

High-society woman Carol (Blanchett) is going through a divorce with husband Harge (Kyle Chandler), who is still struggling with an affair she had with their daughter’s godmother Abby (Sarah Paulson). After striking up a friendship with department store clerk Therese (Rooney Mara), the two women develop a physical relationship which – in the conservative American society of the time – jeopardises Carol’s joint custody of her child. - Alex Zane, The Sun



9:30pm

Spotlight

2015, USA, 128 MINS, 14A

Dir: Tom McCarthy
Starring: Rachel McAdams, Stanley Tucci, Mark Ruffalo, Liev Schreiber, Michael Keaton, John Slattery

Director Tom McCarthy assembles a dream cast for his powerful drama about the journalists who exposed pedophilia in the local Catholic Archdiocese of Boston.

Spotlight calmly and powerfully traces the work of a group of dogged Boston Globe journalists in 2001, who were determined to expose the systematic cover-up of child abuse in the local Catholic Church. It's the story behind the story, and it’s the film equivalent of reading an especially thrilling New Yorker article: ruthlessly detailed, precise and gripping but never brash or overemotional.

This is ‘All The President’s Men’ for the ongoing exposure of the horror of priestly paedophilia. Yet it’s a more subtle, damning film for implicating the media – as much as the church, the courts, the legal profession and other Boston institutions – in the systematic, wider cultural cover-up it describes. These journalists are good, hard-working and principled, but the film falls short of making them heroes, and crucially doesn’t allow media mechanics to over power the true nightmare of the real-life experiences behind their story. There are just enough testimonies here and encounters with victims to make the human side of the story crystal clear without losing focus on the bigger picture of establishment corruption. It’s that all-too-rare beast: a movie that’s both important and engrossing.- TimeOut



Monday February 15, 2016

2:00pm

The Good Dinosaur 3D

2015, USA, 100 MINS, G

Dir: Peter Sohn
Starring: Frances McDormand, Raymond Ochoa, Jeffrey Wright

The Good Dinosaur tells the story of young Arlo (Raymond Ochoa), a timid Apatosaurus and the runt of his litter who goes astray from his family while chasing a young human wildling named Spot (Jack Bright) away from the corn stash.  Forced together in order to survive, Arlo and Spot soon form a deep bond founded on the knowledge that their differences are only skin deep but their similarities boundless.  Travelling in search of Arlo’s home on Clawtooth Mountain, they must find the courage to confront the daunting predators and boundless wilderness that awaits them. - Matthew Lowe, FilmInk

4:00pm

The Big Short

2015, USA, 130 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Mckay
Starring: Brad Pitt, Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Christian Bale, Marisa Tomei

It’s funny because it’s true. And it’s tragic and frightening for the same reason.

Adapted from Michael Lewis’s bestselling book The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine, Adam McKay’s stylized comedic take on the international banking collapse of 2007-08 nerds up Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Brad Pitt and an Oscar-baiting Christian Bale as real-life money-managing eccentrics who, independently, come to realize a market based on subprime loans is going to tank. They decide to short the booming housing market, basically betting on the collapse of the world’s economy.

McKay demystifies big-money jargon and esoterica in enterprising – disruptive? – fourth-wall-smashing ways, such as having shiny pop singer Selena Gomez cameo-explain synthetic collateralized debt obligations.

McKay made a co-name for himself with Will Ferrell collaborations includingAnchorman, but here he lets the outlandishness of a rigged, fairy-tale financial system create its own serious absurdity. The Big Short has a reckless, off-balance energy, with an ending that doesn’t really end the uncertainty: The collapse could happen again, no joke. - Globe & Mail





6:45pm

Spotlight

2015, USA, 128 MINS, 14A

Dir: Tom McCarthy
Starring: Rachel McAdams, Stanley Tucci, Mark Ruffalo, Liev Schreiber, Michael Keaton, John Slattery

Director Tom McCarthy assembles a dream cast for his powerful drama about the journalists who exposed pedophilia in the local Catholic Archdiocese of Boston.

Spotlight calmly and powerfully traces the work of a group of dogged Boston Globe journalists in 2001, who were determined to expose the systematic cover-up of child abuse in the local Catholic Church. It's the story behind the story, and it’s the film equivalent of reading an especially thrilling New Yorker article: ruthlessly detailed, precise and gripping but never brash or overemotional.

This is ‘All The President’s Men’ for the ongoing exposure of the horror of priestly paedophilia. Yet it’s a more subtle, damning film for implicating the media – as much as the church, the courts, the legal profession and other Boston institutions – in the systematic, wider cultural cover-up it describes. These journalists are good, hard-working and principled, but the film falls short of making them heroes, and crucially doesn’t allow media mechanics to over power the true nightmare of the real-life experiences behind their story. There are just enough testimonies here and encounters with victims to make the human side of the story crystal clear without losing focus on the bigger picture of establishment corruption. It’s that all-too-rare beast: a movie that’s both important and engrossing.- TimeOut



9:15pm

Carol

2015, USA, 119 MINS, 14A

Dir: Todd Haynes
Starring: Kyle Chandler, Sarah Paulson, Rooney Mara, Cate Blanchett, Jake Lacy

Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara shine in this tale of love in 1950’s New York from director Todd Haynes (Velvet Goldmine), based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith.

High-society woman Carol (Blanchett) is going through a divorce with husband Harge (Kyle Chandler), who is still struggling with an affair she had with their daughter’s godmother Abby (Sarah Paulson). After striking up a friendship with department store clerk Therese (Rooney Mara), the two women develop a physical relationship which – in the conservative American society of the time – jeopardises Carol’s joint custody of her child. - Alex Zane, The Sun



Tuesday February 16, 2016

6:45pm

Spotlight

2015, USA, 128 MINS, 14A

Dir: Tom McCarthy
Starring: Rachel McAdams, Stanley Tucci, Mark Ruffalo, Liev Schreiber, Michael Keaton, John Slattery

Director Tom McCarthy assembles a dream cast for his powerful drama about the journalists who exposed pedophilia in the local Catholic Archdiocese of Boston.

Spotlight calmly and powerfully traces the work of a group of dogged Boston Globe journalists in 2001, who were determined to expose the systematic cover-up of child abuse in the local Catholic Church. It's the story behind the story, and it’s the film equivalent of reading an especially thrilling New Yorker article: ruthlessly detailed, precise and gripping but never brash or overemotional.

This is ‘All The President’s Men’ for the ongoing exposure of the horror of priestly paedophilia. Yet it’s a more subtle, damning film for implicating the media – as much as the church, the courts, the legal profession and other Boston institutions – in the systematic, wider cultural cover-up it describes. These journalists are good, hard-working and principled, but the film falls short of making them heroes, and crucially doesn’t allow media mechanics to over power the true nightmare of the real-life experiences behind their story. There are just enough testimonies here and encounters with victims to make the human side of the story crystal clear without losing focus on the bigger picture of establishment corruption. It’s that all-too-rare beast: a movie that’s both important and engrossing.- TimeOut



9:15pm

Carol

2015, USA, 119 MINS, 14A

Dir: Todd Haynes
Starring: Kyle Chandler, Sarah Paulson, Rooney Mara, Cate Blanchett, Jake Lacy

Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara shine in this tale of love in 1950’s New York from director Todd Haynes (Velvet Goldmine), based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith.

High-society woman Carol (Blanchett) is going through a divorce with husband Harge (Kyle Chandler), who is still struggling with an affair she had with their daughter’s godmother Abby (Sarah Paulson). After striking up a friendship with department store clerk Therese (Rooney Mara), the two women develop a physical relationship which – in the conservative American society of the time – jeopardises Carol’s joint custody of her child. - Alex Zane, The Sun



Wednesday February 17, 2016

6:45pm

Carol

2015, USA, 119 MINS, 14A

Dir: Todd Haynes
Starring: Kyle Chandler, Sarah Paulson, Rooney Mara, Cate Blanchett, Jake Lacy

Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara shine in this tale of love in 1950’s New York from director Todd Haynes (Velvet Goldmine), based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith.

High-society woman Carol (Blanchett) is going through a divorce with husband Harge (Kyle Chandler), who is still struggling with an affair she had with their daughter’s godmother Abby (Sarah Paulson). After striking up a friendship with department store clerk Therese (Rooney Mara), the two women develop a physical relationship which – in the conservative American society of the time – jeopardises Carol’s joint custody of her child. - Alex Zane, The Sun



9:15pm

Joy

2015, USA, 124 MINS, PG

Dir: David O. Russell
Starring: Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence, Robert De Niro, Virginia Madsen

David O Russell’s wacky screwball spin on the rags-to-riches biopic opens with the line: ‘Inspired by stories of brave women.’ He could just as easily have borrowed the opening line from his last film, ‘American Hustle’ – ‘Some of this actually happened.’ ‘Joy’ is loosely based on the life of Joy Mangano (Jennifer Lawrence), the Long Island single mom who in the early 1990s invented the self-wringing Miracle Mop and became a shopping channel superstar.

Cinema is full of American dreams: stories of men battling to build empires. This is a film about three generations of women. It has some of the macho stuff: the nostalgic voiceover, Scorsese-style, by Joy’s grandma (Diane Ladd); Cream’s ‘I Feel Free’ blasting out; and it ends with Joy sitting behind a giant I’ve-made-it desk like Don Corleone. But Russell also mixes in elements of kitsch soap opera, allowing the dialogue to tip over in bigger-than-life melodrama. Only he could pull off a film with one foot in daytime TV and the other in ‘Goodfellas’. - TimeOut



Thursday February 18, 2016

6:45pm

Joy

2015, USA, 124 MINS, PG

Dir: David O. Russell
Starring: Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence, Robert De Niro, Virginia Madsen

David O Russell’s wacky screwball spin on the rags-to-riches biopic opens with the line: ‘Inspired by stories of brave women.’ He could just as easily have borrowed the opening line from his last film, ‘American Hustle’ – ‘Some of this actually happened.’ ‘Joy’ is loosely based on the life of Joy Mangano (Jennifer Lawrence), the Long Island single mom who in the early 1990s invented the self-wringing Miracle Mop and became a shopping channel superstar.

Cinema is full of American dreams: stories of men battling to build empires. This is a film about three generations of women. It has some of the macho stuff: the nostalgic voiceover, Scorsese-style, by Joy’s grandma (Diane Ladd); Cream’s ‘I Feel Free’ blasting out; and it ends with Joy sitting behind a giant I’ve-made-it desk like Don Corleone. But Russell also mixes in elements of kitsch soap opera, allowing the dialogue to tip over in bigger-than-life melodrama. Only he could pull off a film with one foot in daytime TV and the other in ‘Goodfellas’. - TimeOut



9:15pm

Carol

2015, USA, 119 MINS, 14A

Dir: Todd Haynes
Starring: Kyle Chandler, Sarah Paulson, Rooney Mara, Cate Blanchett, Jake Lacy

Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara shine in this tale of love in 1950’s New York from director Todd Haynes (Velvet Goldmine), based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith.

High-society woman Carol (Blanchett) is going through a divorce with husband Harge (Kyle Chandler), who is still struggling with an affair she had with their daughter’s godmother Abby (Sarah Paulson). After striking up a friendship with department store clerk Therese (Rooney Mara), the two women develop a physical relationship which – in the conservative American society of the time – jeopardises Carol’s joint custody of her child. - Alex Zane, The Sun



Friday February 19, 2016

6:45pm

Brooklyn

2015, Canada/UK/Ireland, 111 MINS, PG

Dir: John Crowley
Starring: Jim Broadbent, Julie Walters, Saoirse Ronan

 

Soaring, swooning and gently nostalgic, “Brooklyn” takes melodrama to a new level of reassuring simplicity and emotional transparency. The exquisite adaptation of Colm Tóibín’s novel about a young Irish woman immigrating to the United States in the early 1950s dispenses with trendy flourishes and sniffy commentary to deliver the kind of movie that Hollywood rarely makes anymore: a sincere, unabashedly tender coming-of-age tale that, for all its deep feeling and wrenching twists and turns, never gives in to sentimentality or maudlin theatrics.

In part, this is because screenwriter Nick Hornby and director John Crowley clearly have affection for the characters that populate the timeless tale, in which Eilis Lacey (Saoirse Ronan), who lives in the small town of Enniscorthy, secures employment at a Brooklyn department store through the offices of a Catholic priest named Father Flood (Jim Broadbent). Without employment prospects at home, she reluctantly sets out for America, leaving behind her cherished mother (Jane Brennan) and older sister (Fiona Glascott). After a crippling bout of seasickness on the boat over, Eilis is still green when she arrives, apprehensively taking rooms in a boarding house and battling her native shyness to make small talk as a shop girl while embarking on night classes to become a bookkeeper.

A delicate, sweepingly romantic portrait of longing and regret, “Brooklyn” eventually puts Eilis in the familiar position of being torn between two men. (Her rival suitor is played by the appealingly bashful Domhnall Gleeson.) But as she learns to become both an American and a post-war-era woman, Eilis is more molded by her relationships with women, from her stylish boss at the department store (Jessica Paré) to her sharp-tongued landlady, played with tart playfulness by Julie Walters.

Ann Hornaday-Washington Post

9:15pm

The Hateful Eight

2015, USA, 167 MINS, 18A

Dir: Quentin Tarantino
Starring: Kurt Russell, Samuel L. Jackson, Jennifer Jason Leigh

Bounty hunter John Ruth (Kurt Russell) is transporting the dangerous prisoner Daisy Domergue (Jennifer Jason Leigh) when he encounters fellow bounty hunter Major Marquis Warren (Samuel L. Jackson) who lost his horse. With the blizzard barreling at them, Ruth agrees to let him tag along. Along the way they pick up another passenger Sheriff Chris Mannix (Walton Goggins). They are surprised when there are others already at their destination. Ruth and Warren are convinced that 1 or 2 of the patrons; Mexican Bob (Demián Bichir), Oswaldo Mobray (Tim Roth), Joe Gage (Michael Madsen) or O.B Jackson (James Parks) is there to break out Domergue.

The film becomes a mystery as to whether one of the patrons really is there to break out Domergue or when Jackson is going to get to go crazy on the old vicious Civil War General, General Sandy Smithers (Bruce Dern).  The inevitable violence in the film is teased and built up to a fever pitch so that when it boils over it feels earned and not gratuitous. - Michelle Alexandria, Eclipse Magazine



Saturday February 20, 2016

2:00pm

3D Screening

Shaun the Sheep

2015, UK/France, 85 MINS, G

Dir: Mark Burton, Richard Starzak
Starring: John Sparkes, Justin Fletcher, Kate Harbour, Omid Djalili, Richard Webber

When Shaun decides to take the day off and have some fun, he gets a little more action than he bargained for. A mix up with the Farmer, a caravan and a very steep hill lead them all to the Big City and it's up to Shaun and the flock to return everyone safely to the green grass of home.

4:00pm

Brooklyn

2015, Canada/UK/Ireland, 111 MINS, PG

Dir: John Crowley
Starring: Jim Broadbent, Julie Walters, Saoirse Ronan

 

Soaring, swooning and gently nostalgic, “Brooklyn” takes melodrama to a new level of reassuring simplicity and emotional transparency. The exquisite adaptation of Colm Tóibín’s novel about a young Irish woman immigrating to the United States in the early 1950s dispenses with trendy flourishes and sniffy commentary to deliver the kind of movie that Hollywood rarely makes anymore: a sincere, unabashedly tender coming-of-age tale that, for all its deep feeling and wrenching twists and turns, never gives in to sentimentality or maudlin theatrics.

In part, this is because screenwriter Nick Hornby and director John Crowley clearly have affection for the characters that populate the timeless tale, in which Eilis Lacey (Saoirse Ronan), who lives in the small town of Enniscorthy, secures employment at a Brooklyn department store through the offices of a Catholic priest named Father Flood (Jim Broadbent). Without employment prospects at home, she reluctantly sets out for America, leaving behind her cherished mother (Jane Brennan) and older sister (Fiona Glascott). After a crippling bout of seasickness on the boat over, Eilis is still green when she arrives, apprehensively taking rooms in a boarding house and battling her native shyness to make small talk as a shop girl while embarking on night classes to become a bookkeeper.

A delicate, sweepingly romantic portrait of longing and regret, “Brooklyn” eventually puts Eilis in the familiar position of being torn between two men. (Her rival suitor is played by the appealingly bashful Domhnall Gleeson.) But as she learns to become both an American and a post-war-era woman, Eilis is more molded by her relationships with women, from her stylish boss at the department store (Jessica Paré) to her sharp-tongued landlady, played with tart playfulness by Julie Walters.

Ann Hornaday-Washington Post

6:45pm

Brooklyn

2015, Canada/UK/Ireland, 111 MINS, PG

Dir: John Crowley
Starring: Jim Broadbent, Julie Walters, Saoirse Ronan

 

Soaring, swooning and gently nostalgic, “Brooklyn” takes melodrama to a new level of reassuring simplicity and emotional transparency. The exquisite adaptation of Colm Tóibín’s novel about a young Irish woman immigrating to the United States in the early 1950s dispenses with trendy flourishes and sniffy commentary to deliver the kind of movie that Hollywood rarely makes anymore: a sincere, unabashedly tender coming-of-age tale that, for all its deep feeling and wrenching twists and turns, never gives in to sentimentality or maudlin theatrics.

In part, this is because screenwriter Nick Hornby and director John Crowley clearly have affection for the characters that populate the timeless tale, in which Eilis Lacey (Saoirse Ronan), who lives in the small town of Enniscorthy, secures employment at a Brooklyn department store through the offices of a Catholic priest named Father Flood (Jim Broadbent). Without employment prospects at home, she reluctantly sets out for America, leaving behind her cherished mother (Jane Brennan) and older sister (Fiona Glascott). After a crippling bout of seasickness on the boat over, Eilis is still green when she arrives, apprehensively taking rooms in a boarding house and battling her native shyness to make small talk as a shop girl while embarking on night classes to become a bookkeeper.

A delicate, sweepingly romantic portrait of longing and regret, “Brooklyn” eventually puts Eilis in the familiar position of being torn between two men. (Her rival suitor is played by the appealingly bashful Domhnall Gleeson.) But as she learns to become both an American and a post-war-era woman, Eilis is more molded by her relationships with women, from her stylish boss at the department store (Jessica Paré) to her sharp-tongued landlady, played with tart playfulness by Julie Walters.

Ann Hornaday-Washington Post

9:15pm

The Hateful Eight

2015, USA, 167 MINS, 18A

Dir: Quentin Tarantino
Starring: Kurt Russell, Samuel L. Jackson, Jennifer Jason Leigh

Bounty hunter John Ruth (Kurt Russell) is transporting the dangerous prisoner Daisy Domergue (Jennifer Jason Leigh) when he encounters fellow bounty hunter Major Marquis Warren (Samuel L. Jackson) who lost his horse. With the blizzard barreling at them, Ruth agrees to let him tag along. Along the way they pick up another passenger Sheriff Chris Mannix (Walton Goggins). They are surprised when there are others already at their destination. Ruth and Warren are convinced that 1 or 2 of the patrons; Mexican Bob (Demián Bichir), Oswaldo Mobray (Tim Roth), Joe Gage (Michael Madsen) or O.B Jackson (James Parks) is there to break out Domergue.

The film becomes a mystery as to whether one of the patrons really is there to break out Domergue or when Jackson is going to get to go crazy on the old vicious Civil War General, General Sandy Smithers (Bruce Dern).  The inevitable violence in the film is teased and built up to a fever pitch so that when it boils over it feels earned and not gratuitous. - Michelle Alexandria, Eclipse Magazine



Sunday February 21, 2016

2:00pm

3D Screening

Shaun the Sheep

2015, UK/France, 85 MINS, G

Dir: Mark Burton, Richard Starzak
Starring: John Sparkes, Justin Fletcher, Kate Harbour, Omid Djalili, Richard Webber

When Shaun decides to take the day off and have some fun, he gets a little more action than he bargained for. A mix up with the Farmer, a caravan and a very steep hill lead them all to the Big City and it's up to Shaun and the flock to return everyone safely to the green grass of home.

4:00pm

Brooklyn

2015, Canada/UK/Ireland, 111 MINS, PG

Dir: John Crowley
Starring: Jim Broadbent, Julie Walters, Saoirse Ronan

 

Soaring, swooning and gently nostalgic, “Brooklyn” takes melodrama to a new level of reassuring simplicity and emotional transparency. The exquisite adaptation of Colm Tóibín’s novel about a young Irish woman immigrating to the United States in the early 1950s dispenses with trendy flourishes and sniffy commentary to deliver the kind of movie that Hollywood rarely makes anymore: a sincere, unabashedly tender coming-of-age tale that, for all its deep feeling and wrenching twists and turns, never gives in to sentimentality or maudlin theatrics.

In part, this is because screenwriter Nick Hornby and director John Crowley clearly have affection for the characters that populate the timeless tale, in which Eilis Lacey (Saoirse Ronan), who lives in the small town of Enniscorthy, secures employment at a Brooklyn department store through the offices of a Catholic priest named Father Flood (Jim Broadbent). Without employment prospects at home, she reluctantly sets out for America, leaving behind her cherished mother (Jane Brennan) and older sister (Fiona Glascott). After a crippling bout of seasickness on the boat over, Eilis is still green when she arrives, apprehensively taking rooms in a boarding house and battling her native shyness to make small talk as a shop girl while embarking on night classes to become a bookkeeper.

A delicate, sweepingly romantic portrait of longing and regret, “Brooklyn” eventually puts Eilis in the familiar position of being torn between two men. (Her rival suitor is played by the appealingly bashful Domhnall Gleeson.) But as she learns to become both an American and a post-war-era woman, Eilis is more molded by her relationships with women, from her stylish boss at the department store (Jessica Paré) to her sharp-tongued landlady, played with tart playfulness by Julie Walters.

Ann Hornaday-Washington Post

6:30pm

Brooklyn

2015, Canada/UK/Ireland, 111 MINS, PG

Dir: John Crowley
Starring: Jim Broadbent, Julie Walters, Saoirse Ronan

 

Soaring, swooning and gently nostalgic, “Brooklyn” takes melodrama to a new level of reassuring simplicity and emotional transparency. The exquisite adaptation of Colm Tóibín’s novel about a young Irish woman immigrating to the United States in the early 1950s dispenses with trendy flourishes and sniffy commentary to deliver the kind of movie that Hollywood rarely makes anymore: a sincere, unabashedly tender coming-of-age tale that, for all its deep feeling and wrenching twists and turns, never gives in to sentimentality or maudlin theatrics.

In part, this is because screenwriter Nick Hornby and director John Crowley clearly have affection for the characters that populate the timeless tale, in which Eilis Lacey (Saoirse Ronan), who lives in the small town of Enniscorthy, secures employment at a Brooklyn department store through the offices of a Catholic priest named Father Flood (Jim Broadbent). Without employment prospects at home, she reluctantly sets out for America, leaving behind her cherished mother (Jane Brennan) and older sister (Fiona Glascott). After a crippling bout of seasickness on the boat over, Eilis is still green when she arrives, apprehensively taking rooms in a boarding house and battling her native shyness to make small talk as a shop girl while embarking on night classes to become a bookkeeper.

A delicate, sweepingly romantic portrait of longing and regret, “Brooklyn” eventually puts Eilis in the familiar position of being torn between two men. (Her rival suitor is played by the appealingly bashful Domhnall Gleeson.) But as she learns to become both an American and a post-war-era woman, Eilis is more molded by her relationships with women, from her stylish boss at the department store (Jessica Paré) to her sharp-tongued landlady, played with tart playfulness by Julie Walters.

Ann Hornaday-Washington Post

9:00pm

The Hateful Eight

2015, USA, 167 MINS, 18A

Dir: Quentin Tarantino
Starring: Kurt Russell, Samuel L. Jackson, Jennifer Jason Leigh

Bounty hunter John Ruth (Kurt Russell) is transporting the dangerous prisoner Daisy Domergue (Jennifer Jason Leigh) when he encounters fellow bounty hunter Major Marquis Warren (Samuel L. Jackson) who lost his horse. With the blizzard barreling at them, Ruth agrees to let him tag along. Along the way they pick up another passenger Sheriff Chris Mannix (Walton Goggins). They are surprised when there are others already at their destination. Ruth and Warren are convinced that 1 or 2 of the patrons; Mexican Bob (Demián Bichir), Oswaldo Mobray (Tim Roth), Joe Gage (Michael Madsen) or O.B Jackson (James Parks) is there to break out Domergue.

The film becomes a mystery as to whether one of the patrons really is there to break out Domergue or when Jackson is going to get to go crazy on the old vicious Civil War General, General Sandy Smithers (Bruce Dern).  The inevitable violence in the film is teased and built up to a fever pitch so that when it boils over it feels earned and not gratuitous. - Michelle Alexandria, Eclipse Magazine



Monday February 22, 2016

6:30pm

Spotlight

2015, USA, 128 MINS, 14A

Dir: Tom McCarthy
Starring: Rachel McAdams, Stanley Tucci, Mark Ruffalo, Liev Schreiber, Michael Keaton, John Slattery

Director Tom McCarthy assembles a dream cast for his powerful drama about the journalists who exposed pedophilia in the local Catholic Archdiocese of Boston.

Spotlight calmly and powerfully traces the work of a group of dogged Boston Globe journalists in 2001, who were determined to expose the systematic cover-up of child abuse in the local Catholic Church. It's the story behind the story, and it’s the film equivalent of reading an especially thrilling New Yorker article: ruthlessly detailed, precise and gripping but never brash or overemotional.

This is ‘All The President’s Men’ for the ongoing exposure of the horror of priestly paedophilia. Yet it’s a more subtle, damning film for implicating the media – as much as the church, the courts, the legal profession and other Boston institutions – in the systematic, wider cultural cover-up it describes. These journalists are good, hard-working and principled, but the film falls short of making them heroes, and crucially doesn’t allow media mechanics to over power the true nightmare of the real-life experiences behind their story. There are just enough testimonies here and encounters with victims to make the human side of the story crystal clear without losing focus on the bigger picture of establishment corruption. It’s that all-too-rare beast: a movie that’s both important and engrossing.- TimeOut



9:00pm

The Hateful Eight

2015, USA, 167 MINS, 18A

Dir: Quentin Tarantino
Starring: Kurt Russell, Samuel L. Jackson, Jennifer Jason Leigh

Bounty hunter John Ruth (Kurt Russell) is transporting the dangerous prisoner Daisy Domergue (Jennifer Jason Leigh) when he encounters fellow bounty hunter Major Marquis Warren (Samuel L. Jackson) who lost his horse. With the blizzard barreling at them, Ruth agrees to let him tag along. Along the way they pick up another passenger Sheriff Chris Mannix (Walton Goggins). They are surprised when there are others already at their destination. Ruth and Warren are convinced that 1 or 2 of the patrons; Mexican Bob (Demián Bichir), Oswaldo Mobray (Tim Roth), Joe Gage (Michael Madsen) or O.B Jackson (James Parks) is there to break out Domergue.

The film becomes a mystery as to whether one of the patrons really is there to break out Domergue or when Jackson is going to get to go crazy on the old vicious Civil War General, General Sandy Smithers (Bruce Dern).  The inevitable violence in the film is teased and built up to a fever pitch so that when it boils over it feels earned and not gratuitous. - Michelle Alexandria, Eclipse Magazine



Tuesday February 23, 2016

6:30pm

The Hateful Eight

2015, USA, 167 MINS, 18A

Dir: Quentin Tarantino
Starring: Kurt Russell, Samuel L. Jackson, Jennifer Jason Leigh

Bounty hunter John Ruth (Kurt Russell) is transporting the dangerous prisoner Daisy Domergue (Jennifer Jason Leigh) when he encounters fellow bounty hunter Major Marquis Warren (Samuel L. Jackson) who lost his horse. With the blizzard barreling at them, Ruth agrees to let him tag along. Along the way they pick up another passenger Sheriff Chris Mannix (Walton Goggins). They are surprised when there are others already at their destination. Ruth and Warren are convinced that 1 or 2 of the patrons; Mexican Bob (Demián Bichir), Oswaldo Mobray (Tim Roth), Joe Gage (Michael Madsen) or O.B Jackson (James Parks) is there to break out Domergue.

The film becomes a mystery as to whether one of the patrons really is there to break out Domergue or when Jackson is going to get to go crazy on the old vicious Civil War General, General Sandy Smithers (Bruce Dern).  The inevitable violence in the film is teased and built up to a fever pitch so that when it boils over it feels earned and not gratuitous. - Michelle Alexandria, Eclipse Magazine



10:00pm

Spotlight

2015, USA, 128 MINS, 14A

Dir: Tom McCarthy
Starring: Rachel McAdams, Stanley Tucci, Mark Ruffalo, Liev Schreiber, Michael Keaton, John Slattery

Director Tom McCarthy assembles a dream cast for his powerful drama about the journalists who exposed pedophilia in the local Catholic Archdiocese of Boston.

Spotlight calmly and powerfully traces the work of a group of dogged Boston Globe journalists in 2001, who were determined to expose the systematic cover-up of child abuse in the local Catholic Church. It's the story behind the story, and it’s the film equivalent of reading an especially thrilling New Yorker article: ruthlessly detailed, precise and gripping but never brash or overemotional.

This is ‘All The President’s Men’ for the ongoing exposure of the horror of priestly paedophilia. Yet it’s a more subtle, damning film for implicating the media – as much as the church, the courts, the legal profession and other Boston institutions – in the systematic, wider cultural cover-up it describes. These journalists are good, hard-working and principled, but the film falls short of making them heroes, and crucially doesn’t allow media mechanics to over power the true nightmare of the real-life experiences behind their story. There are just enough testimonies here and encounters with victims to make the human side of the story crystal clear without losing focus on the bigger picture of establishment corruption. It’s that all-too-rare beast: a movie that’s both important and engrossing.- TimeOut



Wednesday February 24, 2016

6:45pm

Brooklyn

2015, Canada/UK/Ireland, 111 MINS, PG

Dir: John Crowley
Starring: Jim Broadbent, Julie Walters, Saoirse Ronan

 

Soaring, swooning and gently nostalgic, “Brooklyn” takes melodrama to a new level of reassuring simplicity and emotional transparency. The exquisite adaptation of Colm Tóibín’s novel about a young Irish woman immigrating to the United States in the early 1950s dispenses with trendy flourishes and sniffy commentary to deliver the kind of movie that Hollywood rarely makes anymore: a sincere, unabashedly tender coming-of-age tale that, for all its deep feeling and wrenching twists and turns, never gives in to sentimentality or maudlin theatrics.

In part, this is because screenwriter Nick Hornby and director John Crowley clearly have affection for the characters that populate the timeless tale, in which Eilis Lacey (Saoirse Ronan), who lives in the small town of Enniscorthy, secures employment at a Brooklyn department store through the offices of a Catholic priest named Father Flood (Jim Broadbent). Without employment prospects at home, she reluctantly sets out for America, leaving behind her cherished mother (Jane Brennan) and older sister (Fiona Glascott). After a crippling bout of seasickness on the boat over, Eilis is still green when she arrives, apprehensively taking rooms in a boarding house and battling her native shyness to make small talk as a shop girl while embarking on night classes to become a bookkeeper.

A delicate, sweepingly romantic portrait of longing and regret, “Brooklyn” eventually puts Eilis in the familiar position of being torn between two men. (Her rival suitor is played by the appealingly bashful Domhnall Gleeson.) But as she learns to become both an American and a post-war-era woman, Eilis is more molded by her relationships with women, from her stylish boss at the department store (Jessica Paré) to her sharp-tongued landlady, played with tart playfulness by Julie Walters.

Ann Hornaday-Washington Post

9:15pm

Amy

2015, USA/UK, 128 MINS, 14A

Dir: Asif Kapadia
Starring: Amy Winehouse, Mark Ronson, Mos Def, Pete Doherty

Asif Kapadia's extraordinary documentary, Amy, is filled with similarly soul-stirring, heartbreaking moments. A devastating chronicle of the blazing career of the British singer - who died in 2011 at age 27, a victim of too much drink, too many drugs, and too much fame - the film is remarkable not just for the immense talent there to see in Winehouse's performances, but the fact that there isso much to see. 
Steven Rea/Philadelphia Inquirer

Thursday February 25, 2016

6:45pm

Amy

2015, USA/UK, 128 MINS, 14A

Dir: Asif Kapadia
Starring: Amy Winehouse, Mark Ronson, Mos Def, Pete Doherty

Asif Kapadia's extraordinary documentary, Amy, is filled with similarly soul-stirring, heartbreaking moments. A devastating chronicle of the blazing career of the British singer - who died in 2011 at age 27, a victim of too much drink, too many drugs, and too much fame - the film is remarkable not just for the immense talent there to see in Winehouse's performances, but the fact that there isso much to see. 
Steven Rea/Philadelphia Inquirer

9:15pm

Brooklyn

2015, Canada/UK/Ireland, 111 MINS, PG

Dir: John Crowley
Starring: Jim Broadbent, Julie Walters, Saoirse Ronan

 

Soaring, swooning and gently nostalgic, “Brooklyn” takes melodrama to a new level of reassuring simplicity and emotional transparency. The exquisite adaptation of Colm Tóibín’s novel about a young Irish woman immigrating to the United States in the early 1950s dispenses with trendy flourishes and sniffy commentary to deliver the kind of movie that Hollywood rarely makes anymore: a sincere, unabashedly tender coming-of-age tale that, for all its deep feeling and wrenching twists and turns, never gives in to sentimentality or maudlin theatrics.

In part, this is because screenwriter Nick Hornby and director John Crowley clearly have affection for the characters that populate the timeless tale, in which Eilis Lacey (Saoirse Ronan), who lives in the small town of Enniscorthy, secures employment at a Brooklyn department store through the offices of a Catholic priest named Father Flood (Jim Broadbent). Without employment prospects at home, she reluctantly sets out for America, leaving behind her cherished mother (Jane Brennan) and older sister (Fiona Glascott). After a crippling bout of seasickness on the boat over, Eilis is still green when she arrives, apprehensively taking rooms in a boarding house and battling her native shyness to make small talk as a shop girl while embarking on night classes to become a bookkeeper.

A delicate, sweepingly romantic portrait of longing and regret, “Brooklyn” eventually puts Eilis in the familiar position of being torn between two men. (Her rival suitor is played by the appealingly bashful Domhnall Gleeson.) But as she learns to become both an American and a post-war-era woman, Eilis is more molded by her relationships with women, from her stylish boss at the department store (Jessica Paré) to her sharp-tongued landlady, played with tart playfulness by Julie Walters.

Ann Hornaday-Washington Post

Friday February 26, 2016

7:00pm

Carol

2015, USA, 119 MINS, 14A

Dir: Todd Haynes
Starring: Kyle Chandler, Sarah Paulson, Rooney Mara, Cate Blanchett, Jake Lacy

Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara shine in this tale of love in 1950’s New York from director Todd Haynes (Velvet Goldmine), based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith.

High-society woman Carol (Blanchett) is going through a divorce with husband Harge (Kyle Chandler), who is still struggling with an affair she had with their daughter’s godmother Abby (Sarah Paulson). After striking up a friendship with department store clerk Therese (Rooney Mara), the two women develop a physical relationship which – in the conservative American society of the time – jeopardises Carol’s joint custody of her child. - Alex Zane, The Sun



9:30pm

The Big Short

2015, USA, 130 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Mckay
Starring: Brad Pitt, Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Christian Bale, Marisa Tomei

It’s funny because it’s true. And it’s tragic and frightening for the same reason.

Adapted from Michael Lewis’s bestselling book The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine, Adam McKay’s stylized comedic take on the international banking collapse of 2007-08 nerds up Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Brad Pitt and an Oscar-baiting Christian Bale as real-life money-managing eccentrics who, independently, come to realize a market based on subprime loans is going to tank. They decide to short the booming housing market, basically betting on the collapse of the world’s economy.

McKay demystifies big-money jargon and esoterica in enterprising – disruptive? – fourth-wall-smashing ways, such as having shiny pop singer Selena Gomez cameo-explain synthetic collateralized debt obligations.

McKay made a co-name for himself with Will Ferrell collaborations includingAnchorman, but here he lets the outlandishness of a rigged, fairy-tale financial system create its own serious absurdity. The Big Short has a reckless, off-balance energy, with an ending that doesn’t really end the uncertainty: The collapse could happen again, no joke. - Globe & Mail





Saturday February 27, 2016

2:00pm

The Good Dinosaur 3D

2015, USA, 100 MINS, G

Dir: Peter Sohn
Starring: Frances McDormand, Raymond Ochoa, Jeffrey Wright

The Good Dinosaur tells the story of young Arlo (Raymond Ochoa), a timid Apatosaurus and the runt of his litter who goes astray from his family while chasing a young human wildling named Spot (Jack Bright) away from the corn stash.  Forced together in order to survive, Arlo and Spot soon form a deep bond founded on the knowledge that their differences are only skin deep but their similarities boundless.  Travelling in search of Arlo’s home on Clawtooth Mountain, they must find the courage to confront the daunting predators and boundless wilderness that awaits them. - Matthew Lowe, FilmInk

4:00pm

The Big Short

2015, USA, 130 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Mckay
Starring: Brad Pitt, Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Christian Bale, Marisa Tomei

It’s funny because it’s true. And it’s tragic and frightening for the same reason.

Adapted from Michael Lewis’s bestselling book The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine, Adam McKay’s stylized comedic take on the international banking collapse of 2007-08 nerds up Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Brad Pitt and an Oscar-baiting Christian Bale as real-life money-managing eccentrics who, independently, come to realize a market based on subprime loans is going to tank. They decide to short the booming housing market, basically betting on the collapse of the world’s economy.

McKay demystifies big-money jargon and esoterica in enterprising – disruptive? – fourth-wall-smashing ways, such as having shiny pop singer Selena Gomez cameo-explain synthetic collateralized debt obligations.

McKay made a co-name for himself with Will Ferrell collaborations includingAnchorman, but here he lets the outlandishness of a rigged, fairy-tale financial system create its own serious absurdity. The Big Short has a reckless, off-balance energy, with an ending that doesn’t really end the uncertainty: The collapse could happen again, no joke. - Globe & Mail





6:45pm

The Big Short

2015, USA, 130 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Mckay
Starring: Brad Pitt, Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Christian Bale, Marisa Tomei

It’s funny because it’s true. And it’s tragic and frightening for the same reason.

Adapted from Michael Lewis’s bestselling book The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine, Adam McKay’s stylized comedic take on the international banking collapse of 2007-08 nerds up Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Brad Pitt and an Oscar-baiting Christian Bale as real-life money-managing eccentrics who, independently, come to realize a market based on subprime loans is going to tank. They decide to short the booming housing market, basically betting on the collapse of the world’s economy.

McKay demystifies big-money jargon and esoterica in enterprising – disruptive? – fourth-wall-smashing ways, such as having shiny pop singer Selena Gomez cameo-explain synthetic collateralized debt obligations.

McKay made a co-name for himself with Will Ferrell collaborations includingAnchorman, but here he lets the outlandishness of a rigged, fairy-tale financial system create its own serious absurdity. The Big Short has a reckless, off-balance energy, with an ending that doesn’t really end the uncertainty: The collapse could happen again, no joke. - Globe & Mail





9:30pm

Carol

2015, USA, 119 MINS, 14A

Dir: Todd Haynes
Starring: Kyle Chandler, Sarah Paulson, Rooney Mara, Cate Blanchett, Jake Lacy

Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara shine in this tale of love in 1950’s New York from director Todd Haynes (Velvet Goldmine), based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith.

High-society woman Carol (Blanchett) is going through a divorce with husband Harge (Kyle Chandler), who is still struggling with an affair she had with their daughter’s godmother Abby (Sarah Paulson). After striking up a friendship with department store clerk Therese (Rooney Mara), the two women develop a physical relationship which – in the conservative American society of the time – jeopardises Carol’s joint custody of her child. - Alex Zane, The Sun



Sunday February 28, 2016

2:00pm

The Good Dinosaur 3D

2015, USA, 100 MINS, G

Dir: Peter Sohn
Starring: Frances McDormand, Raymond Ochoa, Jeffrey Wright

The Good Dinosaur tells the story of young Arlo (Raymond Ochoa), a timid Apatosaurus and the runt of his litter who goes astray from his family while chasing a young human wildling named Spot (Jack Bright) away from the corn stash.  Forced together in order to survive, Arlo and Spot soon form a deep bond founded on the knowledge that their differences are only skin deep but their similarities boundless.  Travelling in search of Arlo’s home on Clawtooth Mountain, they must find the courage to confront the daunting predators and boundless wilderness that awaits them. - Matthew Lowe, FilmInk

4:00pm

The Big Short

2015, USA, 130 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Mckay
Starring: Brad Pitt, Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Christian Bale, Marisa Tomei

It’s funny because it’s true. And it’s tragic and frightening for the same reason.

Adapted from Michael Lewis’s bestselling book The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine, Adam McKay’s stylized comedic take on the international banking collapse of 2007-08 nerds up Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Brad Pitt and an Oscar-baiting Christian Bale as real-life money-managing eccentrics who, independently, come to realize a market based on subprime loans is going to tank. They decide to short the booming housing market, basically betting on the collapse of the world’s economy.

McKay demystifies big-money jargon and esoterica in enterprising – disruptive? – fourth-wall-smashing ways, such as having shiny pop singer Selena Gomez cameo-explain synthetic collateralized debt obligations.

McKay made a co-name for himself with Will Ferrell collaborations includingAnchorman, but here he lets the outlandishness of a rigged, fairy-tale financial system create its own serious absurdity. The Big Short has a reckless, off-balance energy, with an ending that doesn’t really end the uncertainty: The collapse could happen again, no joke. - Globe & Mail





7:00pm

88th Annual Academy Awards Live Broadcast

2016, 0 MINS, G

With so many phenomenal movies/performances this past year, we've got an event you don't want to miss! So join us for our LIVE screening of the 88th Annual Academy Awards! The show starts at 7pm for the red carpet pre-show and we’ll be showing the broadcast all the way to the finale!

With Oscar Bingo and awards/prizes for Best Dressed, Best Impression and more, you'll want to invite all your friends for this night of fun and film!

While this is a free event, this year the Fox will be accepting donations for the AIDS Committee of Toronto. Any amount will be greatly appreciated and 100% of the proceeds will go to ACT.

Monday February 29, 2016

6:45pm

Carol

2015, USA, 119 MINS, 14A

Dir: Todd Haynes
Starring: Kyle Chandler, Sarah Paulson, Rooney Mara, Cate Blanchett, Jake Lacy

Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara shine in this tale of love in 1950’s New York from director Todd Haynes (Velvet Goldmine), based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith.

High-society woman Carol (Blanchett) is going through a divorce with husband Harge (Kyle Chandler), who is still struggling with an affair she had with their daughter’s godmother Abby (Sarah Paulson). After striking up a friendship with department store clerk Therese (Rooney Mara), the two women develop a physical relationship which – in the conservative American society of the time – jeopardises Carol’s joint custody of her child. - Alex Zane, The Sun



9:15pm

Spotlight

2015, USA, 128 MINS, 14A

Dir: Tom McCarthy
Starring: Rachel McAdams, Stanley Tucci, Mark Ruffalo, Liev Schreiber, Michael Keaton, John Slattery

Director Tom McCarthy assembles a dream cast for his powerful drama about the journalists who exposed pedophilia in the local Catholic Archdiocese of Boston.

Spotlight calmly and powerfully traces the work of a group of dogged Boston Globe journalists in 2001, who were determined to expose the systematic cover-up of child abuse in the local Catholic Church. It's the story behind the story, and it’s the film equivalent of reading an especially thrilling New Yorker article: ruthlessly detailed, precise and gripping but never brash or overemotional.

This is ‘All The President’s Men’ for the ongoing exposure of the horror of priestly paedophilia. Yet it’s a more subtle, damning film for implicating the media – as much as the church, the courts, the legal profession and other Boston institutions – in the systematic, wider cultural cover-up it describes. These journalists are good, hard-working and principled, but the film falls short of making them heroes, and crucially doesn’t allow media mechanics to over power the true nightmare of the real-life experiences behind their story. There are just enough testimonies here and encounters with victims to make the human side of the story crystal clear without losing focus on the bigger picture of establishment corruption. It’s that all-too-rare beast: a movie that’s both important and engrossing.- TimeOut



Tuesday March 1, 2016

6:45pm

Spotlight

2015, USA, 128 MINS, 14A

Dir: Tom McCarthy
Starring: Rachel McAdams, Stanley Tucci, Mark Ruffalo, Liev Schreiber, Michael Keaton, John Slattery

Director Tom McCarthy assembles a dream cast for his powerful drama about the journalists who exposed pedophilia in the local Catholic Archdiocese of Boston.

Spotlight calmly and powerfully traces the work of a group of dogged Boston Globe journalists in 2001, who were determined to expose the systematic cover-up of child abuse in the local Catholic Church. It's the story behind the story, and it’s the film equivalent of reading an especially thrilling New Yorker article: ruthlessly detailed, precise and gripping but never brash or overemotional.

This is ‘All The President’s Men’ for the ongoing exposure of the horror of priestly paedophilia. Yet it’s a more subtle, damning film for implicating the media – as much as the church, the courts, the legal profession and other Boston institutions – in the systematic, wider cultural cover-up it describes. These journalists are good, hard-working and principled, but the film falls short of making them heroes, and crucially doesn’t allow media mechanics to over power the true nightmare of the real-life experiences behind their story. There are just enough testimonies here and encounters with victims to make the human side of the story crystal clear without losing focus on the bigger picture of establishment corruption. It’s that all-too-rare beast: a movie that’s both important and engrossing.- TimeOut



9:15pm

Carol

2015, USA, 119 MINS, 14A

Dir: Todd Haynes
Starring: Kyle Chandler, Sarah Paulson, Rooney Mara, Cate Blanchett, Jake Lacy

Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara shine in this tale of love in 1950’s New York from director Todd Haynes (Velvet Goldmine), based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith.

High-society woman Carol (Blanchett) is going through a divorce with husband Harge (Kyle Chandler), who is still struggling with an affair she had with their daughter’s godmother Abby (Sarah Paulson). After striking up a friendship with department store clerk Therese (Rooney Mara), the two women develop a physical relationship which – in the conservative American society of the time – jeopardises Carol’s joint custody of her child. - Alex Zane, The Sun



Wednesday March 2, 2016

6:45pm

The Martian 3D

2015, 141 MINS, PG

Dir: Ridley Scott
Starring: Kristen Wiig, Jessica Chastain, Matt Damon, Michael Pena, Kate Mara, Jeff Daniels

Led by Commander Melissa Lewis (Jessica Chastain), the Ares 3 space mission has been tasked with collecting soil samples and data on Mars. An unexpected dust storm launches debris at the crew, impaling botanist Mark Watney (Matt Damon) with a rogue satellite and cutting their mission short. Lewis and her crew (Michael PeñaKate MaraSebastian Stan, and Aksel Hennie) have no choice but to leave the presumed-dead Watney behind and escape the planet before the storm irreparably damages their spacecraft. Watney awakens the next day, injured but still alive, and treks back to the crew's home base. All contact to NASA has been lost in the storm, and Watney soon realizes that not only is he stuck on the Red Planet with limited supplies and infrastructure, but that it could be years before the next manned mission will arrive to save him. - Daniel Gelb, All Movie

9:30pm

The Big Short

2015, USA, 130 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Mckay
Starring: Brad Pitt, Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Christian Bale, Marisa Tomei

It’s funny because it’s true. And it’s tragic and frightening for the same reason.

Adapted from Michael Lewis’s bestselling book The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine, Adam McKay’s stylized comedic take on the international banking collapse of 2007-08 nerds up Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Brad Pitt and an Oscar-baiting Christian Bale as real-life money-managing eccentrics who, independently, come to realize a market based on subprime loans is going to tank. They decide to short the booming housing market, basically betting on the collapse of the world’s economy.

McKay demystifies big-money jargon and esoterica in enterprising – disruptive? – fourth-wall-smashing ways, such as having shiny pop singer Selena Gomez cameo-explain synthetic collateralized debt obligations.

McKay made a co-name for himself with Will Ferrell collaborations includingAnchorman, but here he lets the outlandishness of a rigged, fairy-tale financial system create its own serious absurdity. The Big Short has a reckless, off-balance energy, with an ending that doesn’t really end the uncertainty: The collapse could happen again, no joke. - Globe & Mail





Thursday March 3, 2016

6:45pm

The Big Short

2015, USA, 130 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Mckay
Starring: Brad Pitt, Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Christian Bale, Marisa Tomei

It’s funny because it’s true. And it’s tragic and frightening for the same reason.

Adapted from Michael Lewis’s bestselling book The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine, Adam McKay’s stylized comedic take on the international banking collapse of 2007-08 nerds up Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Brad Pitt and an Oscar-baiting Christian Bale as real-life money-managing eccentrics who, independently, come to realize a market based on subprime loans is going to tank. They decide to short the booming housing market, basically betting on the collapse of the world’s economy.

McKay demystifies big-money jargon and esoterica in enterprising – disruptive? – fourth-wall-smashing ways, such as having shiny pop singer Selena Gomez cameo-explain synthetic collateralized debt obligations.

McKay made a co-name for himself with Will Ferrell collaborations includingAnchorman, but here he lets the outlandishness of a rigged, fairy-tale financial system create its own serious absurdity. The Big Short has a reckless, off-balance energy, with an ending that doesn’t really end the uncertainty: The collapse could happen again, no joke. - Globe & Mail





9:15pm

The Martian 3D

2015, 141 MINS, PG

Dir: Ridley Scott
Starring: Kristen Wiig, Jessica Chastain, Matt Damon, Michael Pena, Kate Mara, Jeff Daniels

Led by Commander Melissa Lewis (Jessica Chastain), the Ares 3 space mission has been tasked with collecting soil samples and data on Mars. An unexpected dust storm launches debris at the crew, impaling botanist Mark Watney (Matt Damon) with a rogue satellite and cutting their mission short. Lewis and her crew (Michael PeñaKate MaraSebastian Stan, and Aksel Hennie) have no choice but to leave the presumed-dead Watney behind and escape the planet before the storm irreparably damages their spacecraft. Watney awakens the next day, injured but still alive, and treks back to the crew's home base. All contact to NASA has been lost in the storm, and Watney soon realizes that not only is he stuck on the Red Planet with limited supplies and infrastructure, but that it could be years before the next manned mission will arrive to save him. - Daniel Gelb, All Movie

February 2016

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