Now Playing

Today - Wednesday April 1, 2015

7:00pm

Still Alice

2015, USA, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Wash Westmoreland, Richard Glatzer
Starring: Julianne Moore, Alec Baldwin, Kristen Stewart

Alice Howland, the Columbia University linguistics professor played by Julianne Moore in Still Alice, is on her daily run, jogging the Upper West Side, a familiar route and routine.

In the middle of the campus where she has long been teaching, she stops for a minute, a lost look in her eyes. Suddenly, scarily, nothing seems familiar. Lightheadedness? Stress? The flu coming on?

Or is this a sign of something more serious, devastating?

Unfolding in incremental passages, and shot through with piercing detail, Still Alice is the sad, beautifully realized story of a victim of early-onset Alzheimer's and how the disease that works like an eraser across a vast canvas of memory - progressively wiping it clean - changes a life and the lives of the loved ones and colleagues around her. - Steven Rea

9:10pm

Red Army

2014, Russia, 85 MINS, PG

Dir: Gabe Polsky
Starring: Vyacheslav Fetisov, Scotty Bowman

In answer to Al Michaels’s rhetorical question and iconic exclamation at Lake Placid in 1980, no, the Soviet hockey machine did not believe in miracles. The Soviet hockey machine believed in not being embarrassed by a ragtag collection of U.S. players for an Olympic gold medal ever again, and so the Soviet hockey machine went all boot camp after the Americans’ unlikely Miracle on Ice victory – ruthlessly training its players to superhuman fitness levels and hyper-dedication extremes. Believe in miracles? The Soviet hockey machine believed in the whip, uniformity and puck-based propaganda.

Red Army is Gabe Polsky’s compelling but skewed documentary on the Soviets’ less-than-sporting mentality when it came to the international skating and puck-shooting game. Though the post-Placid glory years – and team captain Viacheslav (Slava) Fetisov – are the focus, ostensibly the film overviews the Soviets’ shinny history from the 1950s into the early 1990s, with special emphasis on sport as a propaganda tool during an era when us-against-them passions ran very, very hot.

Brad Wheeler, The Globe and Mail

Thursday April 2, 2015

7:00pm

Red Army

2014, Russia, 85 MINS, PG

Dir: Gabe Polsky
Starring: Vyacheslav Fetisov, Scotty Bowman

In answer to Al Michaels’s rhetorical question and iconic exclamation at Lake Placid in 1980, no, the Soviet hockey machine did not believe in miracles. The Soviet hockey machine believed in not being embarrassed by a ragtag collection of U.S. players for an Olympic gold medal ever again, and so the Soviet hockey machine went all boot camp after the Americans’ unlikely Miracle on Ice victory – ruthlessly training its players to superhuman fitness levels and hyper-dedication extremes. Believe in miracles? The Soviet hockey machine believed in the whip, uniformity and puck-based propaganda.

Red Army is Gabe Polsky’s compelling but skewed documentary on the Soviets’ less-than-sporting mentality when it came to the international skating and puck-shooting game. Though the post-Placid glory years – and team captain Viacheslav (Slava) Fetisov – are the focus, ostensibly the film overviews the Soviets’ shinny history from the 1950s into the early 1990s, with special emphasis on sport as a propaganda tool during an era when us-against-them passions ran very, very hot.

Brad Wheeler, The Globe and Mail

9:00pm

Still Alice

2015, USA, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Wash Westmoreland, Richard Glatzer
Starring: Julianne Moore, Alec Baldwin, Kristen Stewart

Alice Howland, the Columbia University linguistics professor played by Julianne Moore in Still Alice, is on her daily run, jogging the Upper West Side, a familiar route and routine.

In the middle of the campus where she has long been teaching, she stops for a minute, a lost look in her eyes. Suddenly, scarily, nothing seems familiar. Lightheadedness? Stress? The flu coming on?

Or is this a sign of something more serious, devastating?

Unfolding in incremental passages, and shot through with piercing detail, Still Alice is the sad, beautifully realized story of a victim of early-onset Alzheimer's and how the disease that works like an eraser across a vast canvas of memory - progressively wiping it clean - changes a life and the lives of the loved ones and colleagues around her. - Steven Rea

Friday April 3, 2015

11:00am

Paddington: Fundraiser Canadian Diabetes Association

0 MINS, G

Do you need plans for Good Friday, your kid’s next PD Day?  Come to the Fox Theatre on Friday April 3rd, to see Paddington at 11AM.  You and the kids will love it, and you are supporting Canadian Diabetes Association and Team Maddy. Team Maddy is raising money for Canadian Diabetes Association.  Maddy is a 10 year old girl from the Beaches, who has been living with Juvenile Diabetes for the last 4 years.  With her family, she is raising funds for Team Diabetes.  Her mom, Lea, will run a half marathon in her honour, for Team Diabetes.

Come to the Fox Theatre on April 3rd to help Team Maddy reach their CDA fundraising goal- and to watch a great movie.

Tickets available at the door, day of for $8 kids/ $11 adults.



2:00pm

Paddington

2014, UK, 95 MINS, G

Dir: Paul King
Starring: Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins

“Paddington,” a live-action/CGI-animated take on the tales of the beloved stuffed bear, pulls off a pretty tricky balancing act. It manages to be both old-fashioned and high-tech. It remains faithful to the character’s roots while also placing him firmly within a contemporary setting. It’s charmingly funny and shamelessly punny. (This is a movie in which the GPS instructs a driver to bear left during a car chase, and whaddya know – there’s a bear on the left.)

King’s film offers an origin story for the marmalade-obsessed bear from Michael Bond’s children’s books. When we first meet Paddington (voiced sweetly by Ben Whishaw with some light touches reminiscent of Robin Williams), he’s living in Darkest Peru with his aunt and uncle (Imelda Staunton and Michael Gambon). Years earlier, a British explorer had visited and was amazed to discover the existence of such brilliant, talking bears. Now, when it comes time for young Paddington to make his own way in the world, his aunt sends him to London, since the explorer promised that they’d always be welcome there.

Christy Lemire, rogerebert.com

4:00pm

Selma

2014, USA, 128 MINS, PG

Dir: Ava DuVernay
Starring: David Oyelowo, Carmen Ejogo, Tim Roth

Selma wisely bites off no more than it needs to. Its focus is Martin Luther King in 1965, when he had given his “I have a dream” speech and received the Nobel peace prize, but was still frustrated by the lack of genuine progress on civil rights.

Selma became the flashpoint for the next battle – the right of African-Americans to vote freely – and the greatest strength of Ava DuVernay’s movie is in detailing how strategic King’s leadership was, and how non-violent protest was most effective when it was met with violence. Selma was selected as the battleground precisely on account of its brutal law enforcement and racist governor, George Wallace (Tim Roth somehow fits the role perfectly), all the better to generate newsworthy clashes and thus communicate the struggle to the American people, and ultimately to the White House.

Selma is unimpeachably important, ambitious in its scope and handsomely presented.

Steve Ross, The Guardian



7:00pm

Selma

2014, USA, 128 MINS, PG

Dir: Ava DuVernay
Starring: David Oyelowo, Carmen Ejogo, Tim Roth

Selma wisely bites off no more than it needs to. Its focus is Martin Luther King in 1965, when he had given his “I have a dream” speech and received the Nobel peace prize, but was still frustrated by the lack of genuine progress on civil rights.

Selma became the flashpoint for the next battle – the right of African-Americans to vote freely – and the greatest strength of Ava DuVernay’s movie is in detailing how strategic King’s leadership was, and how non-violent protest was most effective when it was met with violence. Selma was selected as the battleground precisely on account of its brutal law enforcement and racist governor, George Wallace (Tim Roth somehow fits the role perfectly), all the better to generate newsworthy clashes and thus communicate the struggle to the American people, and ultimately to the White House.

Selma is unimpeachably important, ambitious in its scope and handsomely presented.

Steve Ross, The Guardian



9:30pm

50 Shades of Grey

2015, USA, 124 MINS, 18A

Dir: Sam Taylor-Johnson
Starring: Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan

50 Shades of Grey tells the story of a shy young virgin and the broodingly handsome billionaire who invites her into his wonderful world of hanky-spanky. Director Sam Taylor-Johnson and screenwriter Kelly Marcel have brought out a welcome element of cheeky, knowing humor that gradually recedes as the action plunges into darker, kinkier territory. 



Saturday April 4, 2015

2:00pm

Paddington

2014, UK, 95 MINS, G

Dir: Paul King
Starring: Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins

“Paddington,” a live-action/CGI-animated take on the tales of the beloved stuffed bear, pulls off a pretty tricky balancing act. It manages to be both old-fashioned and high-tech. It remains faithful to the character’s roots while also placing him firmly within a contemporary setting. It’s charmingly funny and shamelessly punny. (This is a movie in which the GPS instructs a driver to bear left during a car chase, and whaddya know – there’s a bear on the left.)

King’s film offers an origin story for the marmalade-obsessed bear from Michael Bond’s children’s books. When we first meet Paddington (voiced sweetly by Ben Whishaw with some light touches reminiscent of Robin Williams), he’s living in Darkest Peru with his aunt and uncle (Imelda Staunton and Michael Gambon). Years earlier, a British explorer had visited and was amazed to discover the existence of such brilliant, talking bears. Now, when it comes time for young Paddington to make his own way in the world, his aunt sends him to London, since the explorer promised that they’d always be welcome there.

Christy Lemire, rogerebert.com

4:00pm

Selma

2014, USA, 128 MINS, PG

Dir: Ava DuVernay
Starring: David Oyelowo, Carmen Ejogo, Tim Roth

Selma wisely bites off no more than it needs to. Its focus is Martin Luther King in 1965, when he had given his “I have a dream” speech and received the Nobel peace prize, but was still frustrated by the lack of genuine progress on civil rights.

Selma became the flashpoint for the next battle – the right of African-Americans to vote freely – and the greatest strength of Ava DuVernay’s movie is in detailing how strategic King’s leadership was, and how non-violent protest was most effective when it was met with violence. Selma was selected as the battleground precisely on account of its brutal law enforcement and racist governor, George Wallace (Tim Roth somehow fits the role perfectly), all the better to generate newsworthy clashes and thus communicate the struggle to the American people, and ultimately to the White House.

Selma is unimpeachably important, ambitious in its scope and handsomely presented.

Steve Ross, The Guardian



7:00pm

Wild

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 18A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Reese Witherspoon, Laura Dern, Gaby Hoffmann

Producer-star Reese Witherspoon kicks out the jams in Wild. She's a live wire as Cheryl Strayed, a sleep-around heroin dabbler who, in 1995, found a unique way to deal with her painful lack of self-esteem and the death of her mother (a wonderfully funny and touching Laura Dern): hike the Pacific Crest Trail by herself for 1,100 miles. It's a showstopping performance from an actress who keeps springing surprises. With the help of a scrappy script by Nick Hornby (About a Boy) that allows bursts of humor to break through the darkness, Witherspoon cuts to the bruised core of Cheryl's heart, rattling between desperation and determination. Under the keen-eyed direction of Jean-Marc Vallée (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild emerges as an exciting, elemental adventure that takes you places you don't see coming.  - Peter Travers, RollingStone 

9:20pm

50 Shades of Grey

2015, USA, 124 MINS, 18A

Dir: Sam Taylor-Johnson
Starring: Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan

50 Shades of Grey tells the story of a shy young virgin and the broodingly handsome billionaire who invites her into his wonderful world of hanky-spanky. Director Sam Taylor-Johnson and screenwriter Kelly Marcel have brought out a welcome element of cheeky, knowing humor that gradually recedes as the action plunges into darker, kinkier territory. 



Sunday April 5, 2015

2:00pm

Paddington

2014, UK, 95 MINS, G

Dir: Paul King
Starring: Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins

“Paddington,” a live-action/CGI-animated take on the tales of the beloved stuffed bear, pulls off a pretty tricky balancing act. It manages to be both old-fashioned and high-tech. It remains faithful to the character’s roots while also placing him firmly within a contemporary setting. It’s charmingly funny and shamelessly punny. (This is a movie in which the GPS instructs a driver to bear left during a car chase, and whaddya know – there’s a bear on the left.)

King’s film offers an origin story for the marmalade-obsessed bear from Michael Bond’s children’s books. When we first meet Paddington (voiced sweetly by Ben Whishaw with some light touches reminiscent of Robin Williams), he’s living in Darkest Peru with his aunt and uncle (Imelda Staunton and Michael Gambon). Years earlier, a British explorer had visited and was amazed to discover the existence of such brilliant, talking bears. Now, when it comes time for young Paddington to make his own way in the world, his aunt sends him to London, since the explorer promised that they’d always be welcome there.

Christy Lemire, rogerebert.com

4:00pm

Selma

2014, USA, 128 MINS, PG

Dir: Ava DuVernay
Starring: David Oyelowo, Carmen Ejogo, Tim Roth

Selma wisely bites off no more than it needs to. Its focus is Martin Luther King in 1965, when he had given his “I have a dream” speech and received the Nobel peace prize, but was still frustrated by the lack of genuine progress on civil rights.

Selma became the flashpoint for the next battle – the right of African-Americans to vote freely – and the greatest strength of Ava DuVernay’s movie is in detailing how strategic King’s leadership was, and how non-violent protest was most effective when it was met with violence. Selma was selected as the battleground precisely on account of its brutal law enforcement and racist governor, George Wallace (Tim Roth somehow fits the role perfectly), all the better to generate newsworthy clashes and thus communicate the struggle to the American people, and ultimately to the White House.

Selma is unimpeachably important, ambitious in its scope and handsomely presented.

Steve Ross, The Guardian



7:00pm

Wild

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 18A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Reese Witherspoon, Laura Dern, Gaby Hoffmann

Producer-star Reese Witherspoon kicks out the jams in Wild. She's a live wire as Cheryl Strayed, a sleep-around heroin dabbler who, in 1995, found a unique way to deal with her painful lack of self-esteem and the death of her mother (a wonderfully funny and touching Laura Dern): hike the Pacific Crest Trail by herself for 1,100 miles. It's a showstopping performance from an actress who keeps springing surprises. With the help of a scrappy script by Nick Hornby (About a Boy) that allows bursts of humor to break through the darkness, Witherspoon cuts to the bruised core of Cheryl's heart, rattling between desperation and determination. Under the keen-eyed direction of Jean-Marc Vallée (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild emerges as an exciting, elemental adventure that takes you places you don't see coming.  - Peter Travers, RollingStone 

9:20pm

50 Shades of Grey

2015, USA, 124 MINS, 18A

Dir: Sam Taylor-Johnson
Starring: Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan

50 Shades of Grey tells the story of a shy young virgin and the broodingly handsome billionaire who invites her into his wonderful world of hanky-spanky. Director Sam Taylor-Johnson and screenwriter Kelly Marcel have brought out a welcome element of cheeky, knowing humor that gradually recedes as the action plunges into darker, kinkier territory. 



Monday April 6, 2015

2:00pm

Paddington

2014, UK, 95 MINS, G

Dir: Paul King
Starring: Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins

“Paddington,” a live-action/CGI-animated take on the tales of the beloved stuffed bear, pulls off a pretty tricky balancing act. It manages to be both old-fashioned and high-tech. It remains faithful to the character’s roots while also placing him firmly within a contemporary setting. It’s charmingly funny and shamelessly punny. (This is a movie in which the GPS instructs a driver to bear left during a car chase, and whaddya know – there’s a bear on the left.)

King’s film offers an origin story for the marmalade-obsessed bear from Michael Bond’s children’s books. When we first meet Paddington (voiced sweetly by Ben Whishaw with some light touches reminiscent of Robin Williams), he’s living in Darkest Peru with his aunt and uncle (Imelda Staunton and Michael Gambon). Years earlier, a British explorer had visited and was amazed to discover the existence of such brilliant, talking bears. Now, when it comes time for young Paddington to make his own way in the world, his aunt sends him to London, since the explorer promised that they’d always be welcome there.

Christy Lemire, rogerebert.com

4:00pm

Wild

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 18A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Reese Witherspoon, Laura Dern, Gaby Hoffmann

Producer-star Reese Witherspoon kicks out the jams in Wild. She's a live wire as Cheryl Strayed, a sleep-around heroin dabbler who, in 1995, found a unique way to deal with her painful lack of self-esteem and the death of her mother (a wonderfully funny and touching Laura Dern): hike the Pacific Crest Trail by herself for 1,100 miles. It's a showstopping performance from an actress who keeps springing surprises. With the help of a scrappy script by Nick Hornby (About a Boy) that allows bursts of humor to break through the darkness, Witherspoon cuts to the bruised core of Cheryl's heart, rattling between desperation and determination. Under the keen-eyed direction of Jean-Marc Vallée (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild emerges as an exciting, elemental adventure that takes you places you don't see coming.  - Peter Travers, RollingStone 

7:00pm

50 Shades of Grey

2015, USA, 124 MINS, 18A

Dir: Sam Taylor-Johnson
Starring: Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan

50 Shades of Grey tells the story of a shy young virgin and the broodingly handsome billionaire who invites her into his wonderful world of hanky-spanky. Director Sam Taylor-Johnson and screenwriter Kelly Marcel have brought out a welcome element of cheeky, knowing humor that gradually recedes as the action plunges into darker, kinkier territory. 



9:30pm

Wild

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 18A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Reese Witherspoon, Laura Dern, Gaby Hoffmann

Producer-star Reese Witherspoon kicks out the jams in Wild. She's a live wire as Cheryl Strayed, a sleep-around heroin dabbler who, in 1995, found a unique way to deal with her painful lack of self-esteem and the death of her mother (a wonderfully funny and touching Laura Dern): hike the Pacific Crest Trail by herself for 1,100 miles. It's a showstopping performance from an actress who keeps springing surprises. With the help of a scrappy script by Nick Hornby (About a Boy) that allows bursts of humor to break through the darkness, Witherspoon cuts to the bruised core of Cheryl's heart, rattling between desperation and determination. Under the keen-eyed direction of Jean-Marc Vallée (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild emerges as an exciting, elemental adventure that takes you places you don't see coming.  - Peter Travers, RollingStone 

Tuesday April 7, 2015

7:00pm

Wild

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 18A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Reese Witherspoon, Laura Dern, Gaby Hoffmann

Producer-star Reese Witherspoon kicks out the jams in Wild. She's a live wire as Cheryl Strayed, a sleep-around heroin dabbler who, in 1995, found a unique way to deal with her painful lack of self-esteem and the death of her mother (a wonderfully funny and touching Laura Dern): hike the Pacific Crest Trail by herself for 1,100 miles. It's a showstopping performance from an actress who keeps springing surprises. With the help of a scrappy script by Nick Hornby (About a Boy) that allows bursts of humor to break through the darkness, Witherspoon cuts to the bruised core of Cheryl's heart, rattling between desperation and determination. Under the keen-eyed direction of Jean-Marc Vallée (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild emerges as an exciting, elemental adventure that takes you places you don't see coming.  - Peter Travers, RollingStone 

9:20pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



Wednesday April 8, 2015

7:00pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



9:20pm

Selma

2014, USA, 128 MINS, PG

Dir: Ava DuVernay
Starring: David Oyelowo, Carmen Ejogo, Tim Roth

Selma wisely bites off no more than it needs to. Its focus is Martin Luther King in 1965, when he had given his “I have a dream” speech and received the Nobel peace prize, but was still frustrated by the lack of genuine progress on civil rights.

Selma became the flashpoint for the next battle – the right of African-Americans to vote freely – and the greatest strength of Ava DuVernay’s movie is in detailing how strategic King’s leadership was, and how non-violent protest was most effective when it was met with violence. Selma was selected as the battleground precisely on account of its brutal law enforcement and racist governor, George Wallace (Tim Roth somehow fits the role perfectly), all the better to generate newsworthy clashes and thus communicate the struggle to the American people, and ultimately to the White House.

Selma is unimpeachably important, ambitious in its scope and handsomely presented.

Steve Ross, The Guardian



Thursday April 9, 2015

7:00pm

Selma

2014, USA, 128 MINS, PG

Dir: Ava DuVernay
Starring: David Oyelowo, Carmen Ejogo, Tim Roth

Selma wisely bites off no more than it needs to. Its focus is Martin Luther King in 1965, when he had given his “I have a dream” speech and received the Nobel peace prize, but was still frustrated by the lack of genuine progress on civil rights.

Selma became the flashpoint for the next battle – the right of African-Americans to vote freely – and the greatest strength of Ava DuVernay’s movie is in detailing how strategic King’s leadership was, and how non-violent protest was most effective when it was met with violence. Selma was selected as the battleground precisely on account of its brutal law enforcement and racist governor, George Wallace (Tim Roth somehow fits the role perfectly), all the better to generate newsworthy clashes and thus communicate the struggle to the American people, and ultimately to the White House.

Selma is unimpeachably important, ambitious in its scope and handsomely presented.

Steve Ross, The Guardian



9:30pm

The Imitation Game

2014, UK, 114 MINS, PG

Dir: Morten Tyldum
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley

The Imitation Game is a tense World War II thriller about a stellar team of Brits who cracked Nazi Germany’s Enigma codeIt is an examination of the tragic circumstances that befell Alan Turing, the film’s central hero, who brings victory to the Allies by inventing a revolutionary machine that would give birth to the computer age. He would later be publicly vilified and savagely punished for engaging in homosexual  activity, which was criminalized in England at the time, before committing suicide in 1954. Instead of being festooned with a chest full of medals, the closeted genius who saved countless lives by significantly shortening the war was cruelly subjected to chemically-induced castration in lieu of jail time.

Susan Wloszczyna, rogerebert.com

 



Friday April 10, 2015

7:00pm

Still Alice

2015, USA, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Wash Westmoreland, Richard Glatzer
Starring: Julianne Moore, Alec Baldwin, Kristen Stewart

Alice Howland, the Columbia University linguistics professor played by Julianne Moore in Still Alice, is on her daily run, jogging the Upper West Side, a familiar route and routine.

In the middle of the campus where she has long been teaching, she stops for a minute, a lost look in her eyes. Suddenly, scarily, nothing seems familiar. Lightheadedness? Stress? The flu coming on?

Or is this a sign of something more serious, devastating?

Unfolding in incremental passages, and shot through with piercing detail, Still Alice is the sad, beautifully realized story of a victim of early-onset Alzheimer's and how the disease that works like an eraser across a vast canvas of memory - progressively wiping it clean - changes a life and the lives of the loved ones and colleagues around her. - Steven Rea

9:10pm

Kingsman: The Secret Service

2014, UK/USA, 129 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Facey
Starring: Michael Caine, Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson

The movie follows Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Egerton), a troubled British youth whose life seems to been headed nowhere fast. This changes when Harry “Agent Galahad” (Firth) recruits and trains him to be a member of an international intelligence organization called the Kingsman.  Together they must stop a world domination plot by insane billionaire Richmond Valentine (Jackson).

The action, cinematography, and design all help this film stand out both as a love letter and as a solo film. The action is fast paced and memorable, with the camera following closely behind the actors as they pull off extremely complex, long, and gleefully over the top fight scenes. The addition of numerous spy gadgets, like grenade cigarette lighters and shotgun umbrellas serve as the final piece needed to make this film feel like a true spy movie. It’s also an unbelievably and genuinely funny film.

 

Adam Facey, The Muse

Saturday April 11, 2015

2:00pm

3D Screening

The Spongebob Movie: Fish Out of Water 3D

2015, USA, 93 MINS, G

Dir: Paul Tibbitt
Starring: Antonio Banderas, Tom Kenny

A framing device introduces live-action Antonio Banderas as a pirate snatching a book about SpongeBob’s home village of Bikini Bottom. SpongeBob, you may recall, works for Mr Krabs at Krusty Krab making Krabby Patties. Plankton, a tiny bad guy, has long wanted the secret formula for the Krabby Patties, and he’s finally cooked up a way to snatch it from the Krusty Krab vault. An unforeseen development causes the recipe to disappear, and now SpongeBob and Plankton must join forces to find it, because the lack of Krabby Patties has sent Bikini Bottom into chaos. 

 

The Guardian, Jordan Hoffman



4:00pm

Still Alice

2015, USA, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Wash Westmoreland, Richard Glatzer
Starring: Julianne Moore, Alec Baldwin, Kristen Stewart

Alice Howland, the Columbia University linguistics professor played by Julianne Moore in Still Alice, is on her daily run, jogging the Upper West Side, a familiar route and routine.

In the middle of the campus where she has long been teaching, she stops for a minute, a lost look in her eyes. Suddenly, scarily, nothing seems familiar. Lightheadedness? Stress? The flu coming on?

Or is this a sign of something more serious, devastating?

Unfolding in incremental passages, and shot through with piercing detail, Still Alice is the sad, beautifully realized story of a victim of early-onset Alzheimer's and how the disease that works like an eraser across a vast canvas of memory - progressively wiping it clean - changes a life and the lives of the loved ones and colleagues around her. - Steven Rea

7:00pm

Still Alice

2015, USA, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Wash Westmoreland, Richard Glatzer
Starring: Julianne Moore, Alec Baldwin, Kristen Stewart

Alice Howland, the Columbia University linguistics professor played by Julianne Moore in Still Alice, is on her daily run, jogging the Upper West Side, a familiar route and routine.

In the middle of the campus where she has long been teaching, she stops for a minute, a lost look in her eyes. Suddenly, scarily, nothing seems familiar. Lightheadedness? Stress? The flu coming on?

Or is this a sign of something more serious, devastating?

Unfolding in incremental passages, and shot through with piercing detail, Still Alice is the sad, beautifully realized story of a victim of early-onset Alzheimer's and how the disease that works like an eraser across a vast canvas of memory - progressively wiping it clean - changes a life and the lives of the loved ones and colleagues around her. - Steven Rea

9:10pm

Kingsman: The Secret Service

2014, UK/USA, 129 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Facey
Starring: Michael Caine, Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson

The movie follows Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Egerton), a troubled British youth whose life seems to been headed nowhere fast. This changes when Harry “Agent Galahad” (Firth) recruits and trains him to be a member of an international intelligence organization called the Kingsman.  Together they must stop a world domination plot by insane billionaire Richmond Valentine (Jackson).

The action, cinematography, and design all help this film stand out both as a love letter and as a solo film. The action is fast paced and memorable, with the camera following closely behind the actors as they pull off extremely complex, long, and gleefully over the top fight scenes. The addition of numerous spy gadgets, like grenade cigarette lighters and shotgun umbrellas serve as the final piece needed to make this film feel like a true spy movie. It’s also an unbelievably and genuinely funny film.

 

Adam Facey, The Muse

Sunday April 12, 2015

2:00pm

3D Screening

The Spongebob Movie: Fish Out of Water 3D

2015, USA, 93 MINS, G

Dir: Paul Tibbitt
Starring: Antonio Banderas, Tom Kenny

A framing device introduces live-action Antonio Banderas as a pirate snatching a book about SpongeBob’s home village of Bikini Bottom. SpongeBob, you may recall, works for Mr Krabs at Krusty Krab making Krabby Patties. Plankton, a tiny bad guy, has long wanted the secret formula for the Krabby Patties, and he’s finally cooked up a way to snatch it from the Krusty Krab vault. An unforeseen development causes the recipe to disappear, and now SpongeBob and Plankton must join forces to find it, because the lack of Krabby Patties has sent Bikini Bottom into chaos. 

 

The Guardian, Jordan Hoffman



4:00pm

Toronto Silent Film Festival 1000 Laffs: Risk & Risqué

90 MINS, G

Starring: Charles Chaplin, Buster Keaton,

Hold onto your seats comedy fans—the favourites are back and the rarities too for more belly laughs per screen minute than ever before.

In The Adventurer, Chaplin is a jail-breaker on the run from the police when he is invited to a swank party--what could possibly go wrong? Buster Keaton has other issues with the law in The Goat when he’s mistaken for Dead Shot Dan in a “who’s who” comedy adventure. Laurel & Hardy find themselves in another nice mess when they mistake a stolen painting for a horse in Wrong Again. Be the first Canadian audience to re-discover the greatest comedian you’ve never heard of-Marcel Perez will enchant and delight you in the insanely inventive Sweet Daddy-you’ll never send the husband out for groceries again!

Our special guest from New York City, Ben Model, a noted film historian, silent film composer and one of the foremost silent film accompanists in North America will bring his considerable skills to creating four incredible compositions to accompany the films.

$15 -$10 Senior/Student



7:00pm

Still Alice

2015, USA, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Wash Westmoreland, Richard Glatzer
Starring: Julianne Moore, Alec Baldwin, Kristen Stewart

Alice Howland, the Columbia University linguistics professor played by Julianne Moore in Still Alice, is on her daily run, jogging the Upper West Side, a familiar route and routine.

In the middle of the campus where she has long been teaching, she stops for a minute, a lost look in her eyes. Suddenly, scarily, nothing seems familiar. Lightheadedness? Stress? The flu coming on?

Or is this a sign of something more serious, devastating?

Unfolding in incremental passages, and shot through with piercing detail, Still Alice is the sad, beautifully realized story of a victim of early-onset Alzheimer's and how the disease that works like an eraser across a vast canvas of memory - progressively wiping it clean - changes a life and the lives of the loved ones and colleagues around her. - Steven Rea

9:10pm

Kingsman: The Secret Service

2014, UK/USA, 129 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Facey
Starring: Michael Caine, Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson

The movie follows Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Egerton), a troubled British youth whose life seems to been headed nowhere fast. This changes when Harry “Agent Galahad” (Firth) recruits and trains him to be a member of an international intelligence organization called the Kingsman.  Together they must stop a world domination plot by insane billionaire Richmond Valentine (Jackson).

The action, cinematography, and design all help this film stand out both as a love letter and as a solo film. The action is fast paced and memorable, with the camera following closely behind the actors as they pull off extremely complex, long, and gleefully over the top fight scenes. The addition of numerous spy gadgets, like grenade cigarette lighters and shotgun umbrellas serve as the final piece needed to make this film feel like a true spy movie. It’s also an unbelievably and genuinely funny film.

 

Adam Facey, The Muse

Monday April 13, 2015

7:00pm

Still Alice

2015, USA, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Wash Westmoreland, Richard Glatzer
Starring: Julianne Moore, Alec Baldwin, Kristen Stewart

Alice Howland, the Columbia University linguistics professor played by Julianne Moore in Still Alice, is on her daily run, jogging the Upper West Side, a familiar route and routine.

In the middle of the campus where she has long been teaching, she stops for a minute, a lost look in her eyes. Suddenly, scarily, nothing seems familiar. Lightheadedness? Stress? The flu coming on?

Or is this a sign of something more serious, devastating?

Unfolding in incremental passages, and shot through with piercing detail, Still Alice is the sad, beautifully realized story of a victim of early-onset Alzheimer's and how the disease that works like an eraser across a vast canvas of memory - progressively wiping it clean - changes a life and the lives of the loved ones and colleagues around her. - Steven Rea

9:10pm

Kingsman: The Secret Service

2014, UK/USA, 129 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Facey
Starring: Michael Caine, Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson

The movie follows Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Egerton), a troubled British youth whose life seems to been headed nowhere fast. This changes when Harry “Agent Galahad” (Firth) recruits and trains him to be a member of an international intelligence organization called the Kingsman.  Together they must stop a world domination plot by insane billionaire Richmond Valentine (Jackson).

The action, cinematography, and design all help this film stand out both as a love letter and as a solo film. The action is fast paced and memorable, with the camera following closely behind the actors as they pull off extremely complex, long, and gleefully over the top fight scenes. The addition of numerous spy gadgets, like grenade cigarette lighters and shotgun umbrellas serve as the final piece needed to make this film feel like a true spy movie. It’s also an unbelievably and genuinely funny film.

 

Adam Facey, The Muse

Tuesday April 14, 2015

7:00pm

Kingsman: The Secret Service

2014, UK/USA, 129 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Facey
Starring: Michael Caine, Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson

The movie follows Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Egerton), a troubled British youth whose life seems to been headed nowhere fast. This changes when Harry “Agent Galahad” (Firth) recruits and trains him to be a member of an international intelligence organization called the Kingsman.  Together they must stop a world domination plot by insane billionaire Richmond Valentine (Jackson).

The action, cinematography, and design all help this film stand out both as a love letter and as a solo film. The action is fast paced and memorable, with the camera following closely behind the actors as they pull off extremely complex, long, and gleefully over the top fight scenes. The addition of numerous spy gadgets, like grenade cigarette lighters and shotgun umbrellas serve as the final piece needed to make this film feel like a true spy movie. It’s also an unbelievably and genuinely funny film.

 

Adam Facey, The Muse

9:30pm

Focus

2015, USA, 105 MINS, 14A

Dir: Glenn Ficara, John Requa
Starring: Will Smith, Margot Robbie

Smith stars as Nicky, a third-generation con man who’s been at it so long, not even Nicky is sure where the lies end and the truth begins. Nicky and his team (including Adrian Martinez as Farhad, the obligatory comedic relief/sidekick who knows our antihero better than anyone else) work big events such as the college bowl games, conventions and professional sports championships, where the hard-partying, flush-with-cash tourists make for easy marks.

It’s thievery and it’s hard work. Nicky makes his living one wallet, one stolen credit card, one watch, one necklace at a time.

The beautiful Margot Robbie (Leonardo DiCaprio’s wife in “The Wolf of Wall Street”) is Jess, an inexperienced con who persuades Nicky to show him the ropes. There’s an instant chemistry between the two, but when you have a lifelong professional liar hooking up with an aspiring professional liar, every kiss is tinged with just a speck of doubt.

Smith and Robbie are terrific together. At various points along the way, he’s playing her, and then she’s playing him, and then we’re almost positive they’ve let their collective guard down and they’re really in love …

Or are they?

Richard Roeper-Chicago Sun-Times





Wednesday April 15, 2015

7:00pm

Focus

2015, USA, 105 MINS, 14A

Dir: Glenn Ficarra, John Requa
Starring: Will Smith, Margot Robbie

At the start, Smith’s Nicky and Robbie’s Jess enjoy crackling chemistry as strangers trying to outsmart each other over wine and candlelight at an upscale Manhattan restaurant. She’s a small-time hustler trying to weasel her way into more lucrative gigs. He’s been at this game his whole life and has major operations down to a science. Once each of them realizes the truth about the other—if such a thing as truth is possible in a movie about con artists—she begs him to teach her everything he knows.

We know in a movie like this that we in the audience are being played just as much as the poor fools on screen. In theory, that’s part of the fun—trying to stay a step ahead of the action, and often failing.  

Christy Lemire, RogerEbert.com



9:10pm

Kingsman: The Secret Service

2014, UK/USA, 129 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Facey
Starring: Michael Caine, Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson

The movie follows Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Egerton), a troubled British youth whose life seems to been headed nowhere fast. This changes when Harry “Agent Galahad” (Firth) recruits and trains him to be a member of an international intelligence organization called the Kingsman.  Together they must stop a world domination plot by insane billionaire Richmond Valentine (Jackson).

The action, cinematography, and design all help this film stand out both as a love letter and as a solo film. The action is fast paced and memorable, with the camera following closely behind the actors as they pull off extremely complex, long, and gleefully over the top fight scenes. The addition of numerous spy gadgets, like grenade cigarette lighters and shotgun umbrellas serve as the final piece needed to make this film feel like a true spy movie. It’s also an unbelievably and genuinely funny film.

 

Adam Facey, The Muse

Thursday April 16, 2015

7:00pm

The Royal Tenenbaums

2001, USA, 109 MINS, 14A

Dir: Wes Anderson
Starring: Owen Wilson, Gwyneth Paltrow

The Tenenbaums occupy a big house in a kind of dreamy New York. It has enough rooms for each to hide and nurture a personality incompatible with the others. Royal Tenenbaum (Gene Hackman), the patriarch, left home abruptly some years before and has been living in a hotel, on credit, ever since. There was never actually a divorce. His wife Etheline (Anjelica Huston) remains at home with their three children, who were all child prodigies and have grown into adult neurotics. There's Chas (Ben Stiller), who was a financial whiz as a kid; Margot (Gwyneth Paltrow), who was adopted, and won a big prize for writing a school play, and Richie (Luke Wilson), once a tennis champion. All three come with various partners, children and friends. 

Roger Ebert



9:20pm

Bottle Rocket

1996, USA, 90 MINS, 14A

Dir: Wes Anderson
Starring: Owen Wilson, Luke Wilson

"Bottle Rocket" was shot in and around Austin, Texas, and like "Slacker," another Austin movie, it's in love with the whimsy, coincidences and conversation of everyday life. The plot is about learning to pull stickups, but crime seems almost like an afterthought in many of the scenes, which play more like a documentary on some old friends sitting around trying to think about something to do.

The movie opens with a character named Anthony (Luke Wilson) planning his escape from a mental asylum. Many of the details have been planned by his friend Dignan (Owen C. Wilson), who signals him furtively from a hiding place on the grounds and who seems loonier than Anthony. The escape works, but it's not much of an achievement, since the asylum is a minimum-security institution that anyone can more or less walk away from.

Roger Ebert



Friday April 17, 2015

7:00pm

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

2015, UK, 122 MINS, PG

Dir: John Madden
Starring: Judi Dench, Maggie Smith

If the first “Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” was all about seeking rest and relaxation half a world away in India, then its relatively hectic successor finds the entire ensemble hustling jobs in Jaipur: Douglas (Nighy) gives tours of sites about which he knows precious little; Madge (Celia Imrie) and Norman (Ronald Pickup) tend bar at the expats’ club; Evelyn (Dench) hunts for exotic fabrics; and Muriel (Maggie Smith) co-manages the establishment, which has been such a success that its ambitious — and newly engaged — owner, Sonny Kapoor (Dev Patel), is looking to expand.

All this busyness is good for business, though it makes for a rather high-stress retirement, as no one seems to be taking advantage of the fact they made the move to escape the grind. Though his original hotel is still something of a shambles, Sonny has ambitions to buy a neighboring property and fix it up, too, but for that he’ll need the financial backing of Evergreen, a U.S.-based retirement company managed by a visionary investor (David Strathairn).

Peter Debruge, Variety



9:30pm

What We Do in the Shadows

2014, New Zealand, 86 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jemaine Clement, Taika Waititi
Starring: Jemaine Clement, Taika Waititi

So many comedies are adoringly billed as “dark”, forgetting the ancient showbusiness maxim, “dark is easy; funny is hard”. Fortunately, this mockumentary from New Zealand succeeds in being both: in fact, it’s the best comedy of the year. What We Do in the Shadows is directed by its stars Jemaine “Flight of the Conchords” Clement and Taika Waititi, who in 2005 was Oscar-nominated for his short film Two Cars, One Night. A group of vampires share a house in Wellington, squabbling about the washing up and facing off with a rival gang of werewolves, à la Twilight. The rigour with which their hideous and crepuscular world is imagined, combined with the continuous flow of top-quality gags, makes this a treat from first to last. 

Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian

Saturday April 18, 2015

2:00pm

Paddington

2014, UK, 95 MINS, G

Dir: Paul King
Starring: Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins

“Paddington,” a live-action/CGI-animated take on the tales of the beloved stuffed bear, pulls off a pretty tricky balancing act. It manages to be both old-fashioned and high-tech. It remains faithful to the character’s roots while also placing him firmly within a contemporary setting. It’s charmingly funny and shamelessly punny. (This is a movie in which the GPS instructs a driver to bear left during a car chase, and whaddya know – there’s a bear on the left.)

King’s film offers an origin story for the marmalade-obsessed bear from Michael Bond’s children’s books. When we first meet Paddington (voiced sweetly by Ben Whishaw with some light touches reminiscent of Robin Williams), he’s living in Darkest Peru with his aunt and uncle (Imelda Staunton and Michael Gambon). Years earlier, a British explorer had visited and was amazed to discover the existence of such brilliant, talking bears. Now, when it comes time for young Paddington to make his own way in the world, his aunt sends him to London, since the explorer promised that they’d always be welcome there.

Christy Lemire, rogerebert.com

4:00pm

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

2015, UK, 122 MINS, PG

Dir: John Madden
Starring: Judi Dench, Maggie Smith

If the first “Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” was all about seeking rest and relaxation half a world away in India, then its relatively hectic successor finds the entire ensemble hustling jobs in Jaipur: Douglas (Nighy) gives tours of sites about which he knows precious little; Madge (Celia Imrie) and Norman (Ronald Pickup) tend bar at the expats’ club; Evelyn (Dench) hunts for exotic fabrics; and Muriel (Maggie Smith) co-manages the establishment, which has been such a success that its ambitious — and newly engaged — owner, Sonny Kapoor (Dev Patel), is looking to expand.

All this busyness is good for business, though it makes for a rather high-stress retirement, as no one seems to be taking advantage of the fact they made the move to escape the grind. Though his original hotel is still something of a shambles, Sonny has ambitions to buy a neighboring property and fix it up, too, but for that he’ll need the financial backing of Evergreen, a U.S.-based retirement company managed by a visionary investor (David Strathairn).

Peter Debruge, Variety



7:00pm

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

2015, UK, 122 MINS, PG

Dir: John Madden
Starring: Judi Dench, Maggie Smith

If the first “Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” was all about seeking rest and relaxation half a world away in India, then its relatively hectic successor finds the entire ensemble hustling jobs in Jaipur: Douglas (Nighy) gives tours of sites about which he knows precious little; Madge (Celia Imrie) and Norman (Ronald Pickup) tend bar at the expats’ club; Evelyn (Dench) hunts for exotic fabrics; and Muriel (Maggie Smith) co-manages the establishment, which has been such a success that its ambitious — and newly engaged — owner, Sonny Kapoor (Dev Patel), is looking to expand.

All this busyness is good for business, though it makes for a rather high-stress retirement, as no one seems to be taking advantage of the fact they made the move to escape the grind. Though his original hotel is still something of a shambles, Sonny has ambitions to buy a neighboring property and fix it up, too, but for that he’ll need the financial backing of Evergreen, a U.S.-based retirement company managed by a visionary investor (David Strathairn).

Peter Debruge, Variety



9:30pm

What We Do in the Shadows

2014, New Zealand, 86 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jemaine Clement, Taika Waititi
Starring: Jemaine Clement, Taika Waititi

So many comedies are adoringly billed as “dark”, forgetting the ancient showbusiness maxim, “dark is easy; funny is hard”. Fortunately, this mockumentary from New Zealand succeeds in being both: in fact, it’s the best comedy of the year. What We Do in the Shadows is directed by its stars Jemaine “Flight of the Conchords” Clement and Taika Waititi, who in 2005 was Oscar-nominated for his short film Two Cars, One Night. A group of vampires share a house in Wellington, squabbling about the washing up and facing off with a rival gang of werewolves, à la Twilight. The rigour with which their hideous and crepuscular world is imagined, combined with the continuous flow of top-quality gags, makes this a treat from first to last. 

Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian

Sunday April 19, 2015

2:00pm

Paddington

2014, UK, 95 MINS, G

Dir: Paul King
Starring: Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins

“Paddington,” a live-action/CGI-animated take on the tales of the beloved stuffed bear, pulls off a pretty tricky balancing act. It manages to be both old-fashioned and high-tech. It remains faithful to the character’s roots while also placing him firmly within a contemporary setting. It’s charmingly funny and shamelessly punny. (This is a movie in which the GPS instructs a driver to bear left during a car chase, and whaddya know – there’s a bear on the left.)

King’s film offers an origin story for the marmalade-obsessed bear from Michael Bond’s children’s books. When we first meet Paddington (voiced sweetly by Ben Whishaw with some light touches reminiscent of Robin Williams), he’s living in Darkest Peru with his aunt and uncle (Imelda Staunton and Michael Gambon). Years earlier, a British explorer had visited and was amazed to discover the existence of such brilliant, talking bears. Now, when it comes time for young Paddington to make his own way in the world, his aunt sends him to London, since the explorer promised that they’d always be welcome there.

Christy Lemire, rogerebert.com

4:00pm

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

2015, UK, 122 MINS, PG

Dir: John Madden
Starring: Judi Dench, Maggie Smith

If the first “Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” was all about seeking rest and relaxation half a world away in India, then its relatively hectic successor finds the entire ensemble hustling jobs in Jaipur: Douglas (Nighy) gives tours of sites about which he knows precious little; Madge (Celia Imrie) and Norman (Ronald Pickup) tend bar at the expats’ club; Evelyn (Dench) hunts for exotic fabrics; and Muriel (Maggie Smith) co-manages the establishment, which has been such a success that its ambitious — and newly engaged — owner, Sonny Kapoor (Dev Patel), is looking to expand.

All this busyness is good for business, though it makes for a rather high-stress retirement, as no one seems to be taking advantage of the fact they made the move to escape the grind. Though his original hotel is still something of a shambles, Sonny has ambitions to buy a neighboring property and fix it up, too, but for that he’ll need the financial backing of Evergreen, a U.S.-based retirement company managed by a visionary investor (David Strathairn).

Peter Debruge, Variety



7:00pm

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

2015, UK, 122 MINS, PG

Dir: John Madden
Starring: Judi Dench, Maggie Smith

If the first “Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” was all about seeking rest and relaxation half a world away in India, then its relatively hectic successor finds the entire ensemble hustling jobs in Jaipur: Douglas (Nighy) gives tours of sites about which he knows precious little; Madge (Celia Imrie) and Norman (Ronald Pickup) tend bar at the expats’ club; Evelyn (Dench) hunts for exotic fabrics; and Muriel (Maggie Smith) co-manages the establishment, which has been such a success that its ambitious — and newly engaged — owner, Sonny Kapoor (Dev Patel), is looking to expand.

All this busyness is good for business, though it makes for a rather high-stress retirement, as no one seems to be taking advantage of the fact they made the move to escape the grind. Though his original hotel is still something of a shambles, Sonny has ambitions to buy a neighboring property and fix it up, too, but for that he’ll need the financial backing of Evergreen, a U.S.-based retirement company managed by a visionary investor (David Strathairn).

Peter Debruge, Variety



9:20pm

What We Do in the Shadows

2014, New Zealand, 86 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jemaine Clement, Taika Waititi
Starring: Jemaine Clement, Taika Waititi

So many comedies are adoringly billed as “dark”, forgetting the ancient showbusiness maxim, “dark is easy; funny is hard”. Fortunately, this mockumentary from New Zealand succeeds in being both: in fact, it’s the best comedy of the year. What We Do in the Shadows is directed by its stars Jemaine “Flight of the Conchords” Clement and Taika Waititi, who in 2005 was Oscar-nominated for his short film Two Cars, One Night. A group of vampires share a house in Wellington, squabbling about the washing up and facing off with a rival gang of werewolves, à la Twilight. The rigour with which their hideous and crepuscular world is imagined, combined with the continuous flow of top-quality gags, makes this a treat from first to last. 

Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian

Monday April 20, 2015

7:00pm

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

2015, UK, 122 MINS, PG

Dir: John Madden
Starring: Judi Dench, Maggie Smith

If the first “Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” was all about seeking rest and relaxation half a world away in India, then its relatively hectic successor finds the entire ensemble hustling jobs in Jaipur: Douglas (Nighy) gives tours of sites about which he knows precious little; Madge (Celia Imrie) and Norman (Ronald Pickup) tend bar at the expats’ club; Evelyn (Dench) hunts for exotic fabrics; and Muriel (Maggie Smith) co-manages the establishment, which has been such a success that its ambitious — and newly engaged — owner, Sonny Kapoor (Dev Patel), is looking to expand.

All this busyness is good for business, though it makes for a rather high-stress retirement, as no one seems to be taking advantage of the fact they made the move to escape the grind. Though his original hotel is still something of a shambles, Sonny has ambitions to buy a neighboring property and fix it up, too, but for that he’ll need the financial backing of Evergreen, a U.S.-based retirement company managed by a visionary investor (David Strathairn).

Peter Debruge, Variety



9:30pm

Wild Tales

2014, Argentina, 122 MINS, 14A

Dir: Damián Szifrón
Starring: Darío Grandinetti, María Marull, Mónica Villa

For pure viewing pleasure, the one wild card in the Cannes competition this year is unlikely to be beaten. Argentine helmer Damian Szifron’s “Wild Tales” is a wickedly delightful compendium of six standalone shorts united by a theme of vengeance — the kind that explodes in spectacular bursts after a put-upon soul is screwed over too many times. 

Part of the pic’s satisfaction comes from seeing people, or systems, getting the comeuppance they so richly deserve. Each episode is a variation on the “I’m mad as hell and I’m not going to take it anymore” theme, with put-upon souls reaching their limits of tolerance in gleefully destructive ways. Few of the shorts are especially original, visuals are flawless, and special effects are well handled and perfectly in keeping with the scale of what’s around them.

Jay Weissberg, Variety

Tuesday April 21, 2015

7:00pm

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

2015, UK, 122 MINS, PG

Dir: John Madden
Starring: Judi Dench, Maggie Smith

If the first “Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” was all about seeking rest and relaxation half a world away in India, then its relatively hectic successor finds the entire ensemble hustling jobs in Jaipur: Douglas (Nighy) gives tours of sites about which he knows precious little; Madge (Celia Imrie) and Norman (Ronald Pickup) tend bar at the expats’ club; Evelyn (Dench) hunts for exotic fabrics; and Muriel (Maggie Smith) co-manages the establishment, which has been such a success that its ambitious — and newly engaged — owner, Sonny Kapoor (Dev Patel), is looking to expand.

All this busyness is good for business, though it makes for a rather high-stress retirement, as no one seems to be taking advantage of the fact they made the move to escape the grind. Though his original hotel is still something of a shambles, Sonny has ambitions to buy a neighboring property and fix it up, too, but for that he’ll need the financial backing of Evergreen, a U.S.-based retirement company managed by a visionary investor (David Strathairn).

Peter Debruge, Variety



9:30pm

Wild Tales

2014, Argentina, 122 MINS, 14A

Dir: Damián Szifrón
Starring: Darío Grandinetti, María Marull, Mónica Villa

For pure viewing pleasure, the one wild card in the Cannes competition this year is unlikely to be beaten. Argentine helmer Damian Szifron’s “Wild Tales” is a wickedly delightful compendium of six standalone shorts united by a theme of vengeance — the kind that explodes in spectacular bursts after a put-upon soul is screwed over too many times. 

Part of the pic’s satisfaction comes from seeing people, or systems, getting the comeuppance they so richly deserve. Each episode is a variation on the “I’m mad as hell and I’m not going to take it anymore” theme, with put-upon souls reaching their limits of tolerance in gleefully destructive ways. Few of the shorts are especially original, visuals are flawless, and special effects are well handled and perfectly in keeping with the scale of what’s around them.

Jay Weissberg, Variety

Wednesday April 22, 2015

7:00pm

Wild Tales

2014, Argentina, 122 MINS, 14A

Dir: Damián Szifrón
Starring: Darío Grandinetti, María Marull, Mónica Villa

For pure viewing pleasure, the one wild card in the Cannes competition this year is unlikely to be beaten. Argentine helmer Damian Szifron’s “Wild Tales” is a wickedly delightful compendium of six standalone shorts united by a theme of vengeance — the kind that explodes in spectacular bursts after a put-upon soul is screwed over too many times. 

Part of the pic’s satisfaction comes from seeing people, or systems, getting the comeuppance they so richly deserve. Each episode is a variation on the “I’m mad as hell and I’m not going to take it anymore” theme, with put-upon souls reaching their limits of tolerance in gleefully destructive ways. Few of the shorts are especially original, visuals are flawless, and special effects are well handled and perfectly in keeping with the scale of what’s around them.

Jay Weissberg, Variety

9:30pm

What We Do in the Shadows

2014, New Zealand, 86 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jemaine Clement, Taika Waititi
Starring: Jemaine Clement, Taika Waititi

So many comedies are adoringly billed as “dark”, forgetting the ancient showbusiness maxim, “dark is easy; funny is hard”. Fortunately, this mockumentary from New Zealand succeeds in being both: in fact, it’s the best comedy of the year. What We Do in the Shadows is directed by its stars Jemaine “Flight of the Conchords” Clement and Taika Waititi, who in 2005 was Oscar-nominated for his short film Two Cars, One Night. A group of vampires share a house in Wellington, squabbling about the washing up and facing off with a rival gang of werewolves, à la Twilight. The rigour with which their hideous and crepuscular world is imagined, combined with the continuous flow of top-quality gags, makes this a treat from first to last. 

Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian

Thursday April 23, 2015

6:45pm

2001: A Space Odyssey

1968, USA/UK, 141 MINS, PG

Dir: Stanley Kubrick
Starring: Keir Dullea, William Sylvester, Douglas Rain

2001: A Space Odyssey is a countdown to tomorrow, a road map to human destiny, a quest for the infinite. To begin his voyage into the future, Kubrick visits our prehistoric ape-ancestry past, then leaps millenia (via one of the most mind-blowing jump cuts ever conceived) into colonized space, and ultimately whisks astronaut Bowman (Dullea) into uncharted realms of space, perhaps even into immortality. "Open the pod bay doors, HAL." Let the awe and mystery of a journey unlike any other begin.

9:30pm

A Clockwork Orange

1971, UK/USA, 137 MINS, R

Dir: Stanley Kubrick
Starring: Malcolm McDowell, Michael Bates

Alex lends friendly narration to the audience that he calls "brothers" as he incites violence with a band of delinquent misfits (called "droogs") at his command. Alex gets imprisoned after murdering an upper-class woman in her home. Rather than go to prison he opts to undergo a torturous rehabilitation therapy (the "Ludovico technique"), involving forced viewings of Nazi war films accompanied by Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. The proven effects of the treatment lead to Alex's release into a society where he is repeatedly punished for his past transgressions.-Cole Smithey

Friday April 24, 2015

6:45pm

Mr. Turner

2014, UK, 149 MINS, 14A

Dir: Mike Leigh
Starring: Timothy Spall, Dorothy Atkinson

Keen observer Mike Leigh brings his hawk’s eye to a vibrant rendering of J.M.W. Turner, the celebrated British “painter of light.” The artist is played to perfection by Timothy Spall, who spent two years preparing for the role and who won Best Actor for his efforts at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Spall portrays Turner as a grunting vulgarian. That dismissive grunt is key to his portrayal of a man whose appreciation of life lies entirely on the canvas, which he assaults with a fury of colour and brush strokes.

The film covers the last 25 of Turner’s adult years, finding him restless in London upon his return from overseas travels (including a painterly sojourn to Holland gloriously glimpsed at the outset). It’s only when he travels to the seaside town of Margate, where he roamed as a lad, that his perpetual distemper lifts. There he meets Mrs. Booth (Marion Bailey), the keeper of the inn where he stays, who is curious about this odd and obsessive man. Mrs. Booth finds the man within the ogre.


Peter Howell, The Star



9:40pm

Kingsman: The Secret Service

2014, UK/USA, 129 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Facey
Starring: Michael Caine, Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson

The movie follows Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Egerton), a troubled British youth whose life seems to been headed nowhere fast. This changes when Harry “Agent Galahad” (Firth) recruits and trains him to be a member of an international intelligence organization called the Kingsman.  Together they must stop a world domination plot by insane billionaire Richmond Valentine (Jackson).

The action, cinematography, and design all help this film stand out both as a love letter and as a solo film. The action is fast paced and memorable, with the camera following closely behind the actors as they pull off extremely complex, long, and gleefully over the top fight scenes. The addition of numerous spy gadgets, like grenade cigarette lighters and shotgun umbrellas serve as the final piece needed to make this film feel like a true spy movie. It’s also an unbelievably and genuinely funny film.

 

Adam Facey, The Muse

Saturday April 25, 2015

2:00pm

3D Screening

The Spongebob Movie: Fish Out of Water 3D

2015, USA, 93 MINS, G

Dir: Paul Tibbitt
Starring: Antonio Banderas, Tom Kenny

A framing device introduces live-action Antonio Banderas as a pirate snatching a book about SpongeBob’s home village of Bikini Bottom. SpongeBob, you may recall, works for Mr Krabs at Krusty Krab making Krabby Patties. Plankton, a tiny bad guy, has long wanted the secret formula for the Krabby Patties, and he’s finally cooked up a way to snatch it from the Krusty Krab vault. An unforeseen development causes the recipe to disappear, and now SpongeBob and Plankton must join forces to find it, because the lack of Krabby Patties has sent Bikini Bottom into chaos. 

 

The Guardian, Jordan Hoffman



4:00pm

Mr. Turner

2014, UK, 149 MINS, 14A

Dir: Mike Leigh
Starring: Timothy Spall, Dorothy Atkinson

Keen observer Mike Leigh brings his hawk’s eye to a vibrant rendering of J.M.W. Turner, the celebrated British “painter of light.” The artist is played to perfection by Timothy Spall, who spent two years preparing for the role and who won Best Actor for his efforts at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Spall portrays Turner as a grunting vulgarian. That dismissive grunt is key to his portrayal of a man whose appreciation of life lies entirely on the canvas, which he assaults with a fury of colour and brush strokes.

The film covers the last 25 of Turner’s adult years, finding him restless in London upon his return from overseas travels (including a painterly sojourn to Holland gloriously glimpsed at the outset). It’s only when he travels to the seaside town of Margate, where he roamed as a lad, that his perpetual distemper lifts. There he meets Mrs. Booth (Marion Bailey), the keeper of the inn where he stays, who is curious about this odd and obsessive man. Mrs. Booth finds the man within the ogre.


Peter Howell, The Star



6:45pm

Mr. Turner

2014, UK, 149 MINS, 14A

Dir: Mike Leigh
Starring: Timothy Spall, Dorothy Atkinson

Keen observer Mike Leigh brings his hawk’s eye to a vibrant rendering of J.M.W. Turner, the celebrated British “painter of light.” The artist is played to perfection by Timothy Spall, who spent two years preparing for the role and who won Best Actor for his efforts at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Spall portrays Turner as a grunting vulgarian. That dismissive grunt is key to his portrayal of a man whose appreciation of life lies entirely on the canvas, which he assaults with a fury of colour and brush strokes.

The film covers the last 25 of Turner’s adult years, finding him restless in London upon his return from overseas travels (including a painterly sojourn to Holland gloriously glimpsed at the outset). It’s only when he travels to the seaside town of Margate, where he roamed as a lad, that his perpetual distemper lifts. There he meets Mrs. Booth (Marion Bailey), the keeper of the inn where he stays, who is curious about this odd and obsessive man. Mrs. Booth finds the man within the ogre.


Peter Howell, The Star



9:40pm

Kingsman: The Secret Service

2014, UK/USA, 129 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Facey
Starring: Michael Caine, Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson

The movie follows Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Egerton), a troubled British youth whose life seems to been headed nowhere fast. This changes when Harry “Agent Galahad” (Firth) recruits and trains him to be a member of an international intelligence organization called the Kingsman.  Together they must stop a world domination plot by insane billionaire Richmond Valentine (Jackson).

The action, cinematography, and design all help this film stand out both as a love letter and as a solo film. The action is fast paced and memorable, with the camera following closely behind the actors as they pull off extremely complex, long, and gleefully over the top fight scenes. The addition of numerous spy gadgets, like grenade cigarette lighters and shotgun umbrellas serve as the final piece needed to make this film feel like a true spy movie. It’s also an unbelievably and genuinely funny film.

 

Adam Facey, The Muse

Sunday April 26, 2015

2:00pm

3D Screening

The Spongebob Movie: Fish Out of Water 3D

2015, USA, 93 MINS, G

Dir: Paul Tibbitt
Starring: Antonio Banderas, Tom Kenny

A framing device introduces live-action Antonio Banderas as a pirate snatching a book about SpongeBob’s home village of Bikini Bottom. SpongeBob, you may recall, works for Mr Krabs at Krusty Krab making Krabby Patties. Plankton, a tiny bad guy, has long wanted the secret formula for the Krabby Patties, and he’s finally cooked up a way to snatch it from the Krusty Krab vault. An unforeseen development causes the recipe to disappear, and now SpongeBob and Plankton must join forces to find it, because the lack of Krabby Patties has sent Bikini Bottom into chaos. 

 

The Guardian, Jordan Hoffman



4:00pm

Kingsman: The Secret Service

2014, UK/USA, 129 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Facey
Starring: Michael Caine, Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson

The movie follows Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Egerton), a troubled British youth whose life seems to been headed nowhere fast. This changes when Harry “Agent Galahad” (Firth) recruits and trains him to be a member of an international intelligence organization called the Kingsman.  Together they must stop a world domination plot by insane billionaire Richmond Valentine (Jackson).

The action, cinematography, and design all help this film stand out both as a love letter and as a solo film. The action is fast paced and memorable, with the camera following closely behind the actors as they pull off extremely complex, long, and gleefully over the top fight scenes. The addition of numerous spy gadgets, like grenade cigarette lighters and shotgun umbrellas serve as the final piece needed to make this film feel like a true spy movie. It’s also an unbelievably and genuinely funny film.

 

Adam Facey, The Muse

6:40pm

Mr. Turner

2014, UK, 149 MINS, 14A

Dir: Mike Leigh
Starring: Timothy Spall, Dorothy Atkinson

Keen observer Mike Leigh brings his hawk’s eye to a vibrant rendering of J.M.W. Turner, the celebrated British “painter of light.” The artist is played to perfection by Timothy Spall, who spent two years preparing for the role and who won Best Actor for his efforts at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Spall portrays Turner as a grunting vulgarian. That dismissive grunt is key to his portrayal of a man whose appreciation of life lies entirely on the canvas, which he assaults with a fury of colour and brush strokes.

The film covers the last 25 of Turner’s adult years, finding him restless in London upon his return from overseas travels (including a painterly sojourn to Holland gloriously glimpsed at the outset). It’s only when he travels to the seaside town of Margate, where he roamed as a lad, that his perpetual distemper lifts. There he meets Mrs. Booth (Marion Bailey), the keeper of the inn where he stays, who is curious about this odd and obsessive man. Mrs. Booth finds the man within the ogre.


Peter Howell, The Star



9:30pm

Kingsman: The Secret Service

2014, UK/USA, 129 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Facey
Starring: Michael Caine, Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson

The movie follows Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Egerton), a troubled British youth whose life seems to been headed nowhere fast. This changes when Harry “Agent Galahad” (Firth) recruits and trains him to be a member of an international intelligence organization called the Kingsman.  Together they must stop a world domination plot by insane billionaire Richmond Valentine (Jackson).

The action, cinematography, and design all help this film stand out both as a love letter and as a solo film. The action is fast paced and memorable, with the camera following closely behind the actors as they pull off extremely complex, long, and gleefully over the top fight scenes. The addition of numerous spy gadgets, like grenade cigarette lighters and shotgun umbrellas serve as the final piece needed to make this film feel like a true spy movie. It’s also an unbelievably and genuinely funny film.

 

Adam Facey, The Muse

Monday April 27, 2015

6:40pm

Mr. Turner

2014, UK, 149 MINS, 14A

Dir: Mike Leigh
Starring: Timothy Spall, Dorothy Atkinson

Keen observer Mike Leigh brings his hawk’s eye to a vibrant rendering of J.M.W. Turner, the celebrated British “painter of light.” The artist is played to perfection by Timothy Spall, who spent two years preparing for the role and who won Best Actor for his efforts at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Spall portrays Turner as a grunting vulgarian. That dismissive grunt is key to his portrayal of a man whose appreciation of life lies entirely on the canvas, which he assaults with a fury of colour and brush strokes.

The film covers the last 25 of Turner’s adult years, finding him restless in London upon his return from overseas travels (including a painterly sojourn to Holland gloriously glimpsed at the outset). It’s only when he travels to the seaside town of Margate, where he roamed as a lad, that his perpetual distemper lifts. There he meets Mrs. Booth (Marion Bailey), the keeper of the inn where he stays, who is curious about this odd and obsessive man. Mrs. Booth finds the man within the ogre.


Peter Howell, The Star



9:30pm

Kingsman: The Secret Service

2014, UK/USA, 129 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Facey
Starring: Michael Caine, Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson

The movie follows Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Egerton), a troubled British youth whose life seems to been headed nowhere fast. This changes when Harry “Agent Galahad” (Firth) recruits and trains him to be a member of an international intelligence organization called the Kingsman.  Together they must stop a world domination plot by insane billionaire Richmond Valentine (Jackson).

The action, cinematography, and design all help this film stand out both as a love letter and as a solo film. The action is fast paced and memorable, with the camera following closely behind the actors as they pull off extremely complex, long, and gleefully over the top fight scenes. The addition of numerous spy gadgets, like grenade cigarette lighters and shotgun umbrellas serve as the final piece needed to make this film feel like a true spy movie. It’s also an unbelievably and genuinely funny film.

 

Adam Facey, The Muse

Tuesday April 28, 2015

7:00pm

Kingsman: The Secret Service

2014, UK/USA, 129 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Facey
Starring: Michael Caine, Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson

The movie follows Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Egerton), a troubled British youth whose life seems to been headed nowhere fast. This changes when Harry “Agent Galahad” (Firth) recruits and trains him to be a member of an international intelligence organization called the Kingsman.  Together they must stop a world domination plot by insane billionaire Richmond Valentine (Jackson).

The action, cinematography, and design all help this film stand out both as a love letter and as a solo film. The action is fast paced and memorable, with the camera following closely behind the actors as they pull off extremely complex, long, and gleefully over the top fight scenes. The addition of numerous spy gadgets, like grenade cigarette lighters and shotgun umbrellas serve as the final piece needed to make this film feel like a true spy movie. It’s also an unbelievably and genuinely funny film.

 

Adam Facey, The Muse

9:30pm

Seymour: An Introduction

2014, USA, 82 MINS, G

Dir: Ethan Hawke
Starring: Ethan Hawke, Seymour Bernstein

The great classical pianist Seymour Bernstein is as graceful a speaker as he is a musician, and his voice rings out with wondrous depth and clarity in “Seymour: An Introduction.” Although clearly designed as a reverent tribute from one artist to another, this first documentary directed by Ethan Hawke happily sidesteps any vanity-project pitfalls, granting full expression to Bernstein’s wise and witty commentary on a craft that he’s spent decades honing — as well as the proper application of that craft when the demands of art are often outweighed by the pressures of commerce. 

Justin Chang, Variety

Wednesday April 29, 2015

7:00pm

Seymour: An Introduction

2014, USA, 82 MINS, G

Dir: Ethan Hawke
Starring: Ethan Hawke, Seymour Bernstein

The great classical pianist Seymour Bernstein is as graceful a speaker as he is a musician, and his voice rings out with wondrous depth and clarity in “Seymour: An Introduction.” Although clearly designed as a reverent tribute from one artist to another, this first documentary directed by Ethan Hawke happily sidesteps any vanity-project pitfalls, granting full expression to Bernstein’s wise and witty commentary on a craft that he’s spent decades honing — as well as the proper application of that craft when the demands of art are often outweighed by the pressures of commerce. 

Justin Chang, Variety

9:00pm

Kingsman: The Secret Service

2014, UK/USA, 129 MINS, 14A

Dir: Adam Facey
Starring: Michael Caine, Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson

The movie follows Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Egerton), a troubled British youth whose life seems to been headed nowhere fast. This changes when Harry “Agent Galahad” (Firth) recruits and trains him to be a member of an international intelligence organization called the Kingsman.  Together they must stop a world domination plot by insane billionaire Richmond Valentine (Jackson).

The action, cinematography, and design all help this film stand out both as a love letter and as a solo film. The action is fast paced and memorable, with the camera following closely behind the actors as they pull off extremely complex, long, and gleefully over the top fight scenes. The addition of numerous spy gadgets, like grenade cigarette lighters and shotgun umbrellas serve as the final piece needed to make this film feel like a true spy movie. It’s also an unbelievably and genuinely funny film.

 

Adam Facey, The Muse

Thursday April 30, 2015

7:00pm

Big Trouble In Little China

1986, USA, 99 MINS, 14A

Dir: John Carpenter
Starring: Kurt Russell, Kim Catrall

The film stars long time Carpenter cohort Kurt Russell as Jack Burton, a mullet wearing, big talking truck driver who is drawn into a mystical, centuries old war underneath San Francisco’s Chinatown, after he agrees to help his best friend Wang Chi (Dennis Dun) rescue his fiancée from the clutches of a cursed evil sorcerer named Lo Pan (James Hong). Along the way Burton and Wang must battle against supernatural warriors and demons, with help from motor mouth lawyer Gracie Law (Kim Catrrall) and sorcerer Egg Shen (Victor Wong).- Matthew Pejkovic

9:10pm

Big Lebowski, The

1998, USA/UK, 117 MINS, 14A

Dir: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Starring: Jeff Bridges, John Goodman, Steve Buscemi, Julianne Moore, Phillip Seymour-Hoffman

Bridges plays Jeff Lebowski, alias "The Dude." Lost permanently in the 1970s, he wanders around Venice, Calif., in a pot-suffused haze. He likes drinking White Russians, and he loves to hurl balls with his regular pals, Walter (Goodman), the loudmouthed owner of a security store, and Donny (Buscemi), a laid-back former surfer. In their screenplay for this movie, Ethan (also the producer) and Joel Coen (who directed) describe the Dude as "a man in whom casualness runs deep." They couldn't have put it better.
The Dude's life is rudely interrupted when two bruisers rough him up, supposedly to threaten him for his wife's gambling excesses. But the Dude isn't even married. It seems the thugs, who work for a mysterious man called Jackie Treehorn (Ben Gazzara), have mistaken him for another Jeff Lebowski (David Huddleston), an old Pasadena millionaire whose wife racked up all that debt. To add insult to injury, one of them urinates on Dude's favorite rug. With their inspired, absurdist taste for weird, peculiar Americana-but a sort of neo-Americana that is entirely invented-the Coens have defined and mastered their own bizarre subgenre. No one does it like them and, it almost goes without saying, no one does it better. Desson Howe- Washington Post

April 2015

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