Now Playing

Today - Wednesday July 23, 2014

7:00pm

Fading Gigolo

2014, USA, 98 MINS, 14A

Dir: John Turturro
Starring: John Turturro, Woody Allen, Sharon Stone, Vanessa Paradis, Sofia Vergara

In Fading Gigolo, set in a vivid and instantly recognizable New York, Woody Allen plays Murray, the owner of a rare-books store who's being forced to close up shop.  Murray's dermatologist has mentioned that she and her girlfriend are interested in setting up a threesome — might he know a suitable, good-looking candidate? Murray immediately thinks of his friend, Fioravante (Turturro), a part-time florist who's been helping out at the shop. Fioravante at first demurs, but relents because he needs money, too — and, as he comes to find out, Murray's "clients" turn out to be sultry hotties played, with gusto, by Sharon Stone and Sofia Vergara.  

Fading Gigolo is a breeze, enjoyable both for its sweetness and its unapologetic silliness. If you've seen Turturro's 2005 infidelity musical Romance & Cigarettes, you know he has a knack for finding the right song for every occasion, even the zaniest, and he doesn't fail us here. 

Village Voice Stephanie Zacharek

9:00pm

3D Screening

Edge of Tomorrow 3-D

2014, USA, 113 MINS, PG

Dir: Doug Liman
Starring: Tom Cruise, Emily Blunt

"Edge of Tomorrow" is less of a time travel movie than an experience movie; that statement might not make sense now, but it probably will after you've seen it. Based on Hiroshi Sikurazaka's novel "All You Need is Kill", it's a true science fiction film, highly conceptual, set during the aftermath of an alien invasion. The fierce, octopod-looking beasties known as Mimics are controlled hive-mind style by a creature that seems able to peer through time, or rupture it, or something. When the tale begins, we don't have exact answers about the enemy's powers (that's for our intrepid heroes to find out), but we have a solid hunch that it can see possible futures through the eyes of specific humans, then treat them as, essentially, video game characters, following their progress through the nasty "adventure" of the war, and making note of their tactical maneuvers, the better to ensure our collective extermination. 

Cruise is hugely appealing here, not just in the early scenes opposite Gleeson in which he's inTony Curtis mode—he's always fantastic playing a smooth-talking manipulator who's sweating on the inside—but later, where he exhibits the sort of rock-solid super-competence and unforced decency that Randolph Scott brought to Budd Boetticher's westerns. He was always likable, sometimes perfect in the right role, but age has deepened him by bringing out his vulnerability. Cruise deserves some sort of acting award for the array of yelps and gasps he summons as he's killed by a Mimic or shot in the head by Blunt and then rebooted into another version of the story.

The movie has an organic intelligence and a sense that it, too, exists outside of linear time. It seems to be creating itself as you watch it.  

Matt Zoller Seitz, rogerebert.com


Thursday July 24, 2014

7:00pm

The Lunchbox

2014, India, France, Germany, USA, 105 MINS, G

Dir: Ritesh Batra
Starring: Irrfan Khan, Nimrat Kaur, Nawazuddin Siddiqui

Charming hearts and making hungry stomachs growl, Ritesh Batra's bittersweet romance delights. Set amid Mumbai's courier system of lunch delivery, a mistaken dropoff creates pen pals and perhaps more of an unfulfilled housewife and a bored bureaucrat.

Ila is devoted to a husband who may be cheating, hoping to regain favor by preparing him lunches of his favorite recipes. The deliveries end up with an aging, melancholy soul named Saajan, played by Irrfan Khan (The Life of Pi), whose complimentary replies flatter Ila as her husband doesn't. Saajan is smitten, first with the food — truly mouth-watering to see — and then by Ila's notes accompanying each meal. Two people trapped in dead-end existences develop a pen pal friendship with the faint chance of escaping with each other. Steve Persall, Tampa Bay Times



9:00pm

Fading Gigolo

2014, USA, 98 MINS, 14A

Dir: John Turturro
Starring: John Turturro, Woody Allen, Sharon Stone, Vanessa Paradis, Sofia Vergara

In Fading Gigolo, set in a vivid and instantly recognizable New York, Woody Allen plays Murray, the owner of a rare-books store who's being forced to close up shop.  Murray's dermatologist has mentioned that she and her girlfriend are interested in setting up a threesome — might he know a suitable, good-looking candidate? Murray immediately thinks of his friend, Fioravante (Turturro), a part-time florist who's been helping out at the shop. Fioravante at first demurs, but relents because he needs money, too — and, as he comes to find out, Murray's "clients" turn out to be sultry hotties played, with gusto, by Sharon Stone and Sofia Vergara.  

Fading Gigolo is a breeze, enjoyable both for its sweetness and its unapologetic silliness. If you've seen Turturro's 2005 infidelity musical Romance & Cigarettes, you know he has a knack for finding the right song for every occasion, even the zaniest, and he doesn't fail us here. 

Village Voice Stephanie Zacharek

Friday July 25, 2014

7:00pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

9:15pm

22 Jump Street

2014, USA, 112 MINS, 14A

Dir: Phil Lord, Christopher Miller
Starring: Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum

College comedies are a genre themselves and 22 Jump Street is a good one. It completely embraces all the college antics it’s allowed to explore this time around. What the movie is really “about” (besides being about itself) is the bond between Hill and Tatum’s Schmidt and Jenko. Like 21 Jump Street, this is a movie about their partnership and figuring out if they’re still crucial to each other or if they’d be better off realizing their differences and taking separate paths. The story is about exploring male friendship, and it does it well.

In the end, 22 Jump Street is hilarious. Never has a movie that’s been this meta been this great, and it’s the funniest comedy of the past few years. The laughs are consistent, and some of them are huge. Most summer blockbusters demand to be seen on the big screen for the spectacle of it, but 22 Jump Street deserves the same ticket price for the experience of it. This is one you’ll want to experience in a packed, laughing theater.

Louie Schuth, hypable.com





Saturday July 26, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial

1982, USA, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Steven Spielberg
Starring: Henry Thomas, Drew Barrymore

The Toronto Beaches Children's Chorus invites to you to come and watch E.T: The Extra-Terrestrial on the big screen!  Apart from having fun on a PA day, you will be supporting our choristers as they fundraise to go to Nashville Tennessee for a choral festival on July 2014.
 
Tickets are $10.

4:30pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

7:00pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

9:15pm

22 Jump Street

2014, USA, 112 MINS, 14A

Dir: Phil Lord, Christopher Miller
Starring: Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum

College comedies are a genre themselves and 22 Jump Street is a good one. It completely embraces all the college antics it’s allowed to explore this time around. What the movie is really “about” (besides being about itself) is the bond between Hill and Tatum’s Schmidt and Jenko. Like 21 Jump Street, this is a movie about their partnership and figuring out if they’re still crucial to each other or if they’d be better off realizing their differences and taking separate paths. The story is about exploring male friendship, and it does it well.

In the end, 22 Jump Street is hilarious. Never has a movie that’s been this meta been this great, and it’s the funniest comedy of the past few years. The laughs are consistent, and some of them are huge. Most summer blockbusters demand to be seen on the big screen for the spectacle of it, but 22 Jump Street deserves the same ticket price for the experience of it. This is one you’ll want to experience in a packed, laughing theater.

Louie Schuth, hypable.com





Sunday July 27, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

E.T.: The Extra Terrestrial

1982, USA, 120 MINS, PG

Dir: Steven Spielberg
Starring: Henry Thomas, Dee Wallace-Stone, Drew Barrymore

An alien botanist is left behind on an expedition to Earth, and befriends alienated middle child Elliott (Henry Thomas), who christens him ET. Elliott and ET form a close bond, and the benevolent little brown creature manages to bring together a family. With E.T. The Extra Terrestrial, Spielberg triumphantly succeeds in bringing the magical to the everyday. Film 4



4:30pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

7:00pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

9:15pm

22 Jump Street

2014, USA, 112 MINS, 14A

Dir: Phil Lord, Christopher Miller
Starring: Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum

College comedies are a genre themselves and 22 Jump Street is a good one. It completely embraces all the college antics it’s allowed to explore this time around. What the movie is really “about” (besides being about itself) is the bond between Hill and Tatum’s Schmidt and Jenko. Like 21 Jump Street, this is a movie about their partnership and figuring out if they’re still crucial to each other or if they’d be better off realizing their differences and taking separate paths. The story is about exploring male friendship, and it does it well.

In the end, 22 Jump Street is hilarious. Never has a movie that’s been this meta been this great, and it’s the funniest comedy of the past few years. The laughs are consistent, and some of them are huge. Most summer blockbusters demand to be seen on the big screen for the spectacle of it, but 22 Jump Street deserves the same ticket price for the experience of it. This is one you’ll want to experience in a packed, laughing theater.

Louie Schuth, hypable.com





Monday July 28, 2014

7:00pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

9:15pm

22 Jump Street

2014, USA, 112 MINS, 14A

Dir: Phil Lord, Christopher Miller
Starring: Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum

College comedies are a genre themselves and 22 Jump Street is a good one. It completely embraces all the college antics it’s allowed to explore this time around. What the movie is really “about” (besides being about itself) is the bond between Hill and Tatum’s Schmidt and Jenko. Like 21 Jump Street, this is a movie about their partnership and figuring out if they’re still crucial to each other or if they’d be better off realizing their differences and taking separate paths. The story is about exploring male friendship, and it does it well.

In the end, 22 Jump Street is hilarious. Never has a movie that’s been this meta been this great, and it’s the funniest comedy of the past few years. The laughs are consistent, and some of them are huge. Most summer blockbusters demand to be seen on the big screen for the spectacle of it, but 22 Jump Street deserves the same ticket price for the experience of it. This is one you’ll want to experience in a packed, laughing theater.

Louie Schuth, hypable.com





Tuesday July 29, 2014

7:00pm

22 Jump Street

2014, USA, 112 MINS, 14A

Dir: Phil Lord, Christopher Miller
Starring: Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum

College comedies are a genre themselves and 22 Jump Street is a good one. It completely embraces all the college antics it’s allowed to explore this time around. What the movie is really “about” (besides being about itself) is the bond between Hill and Tatum’s Schmidt and Jenko. Like 21 Jump Street, this is a movie about their partnership and figuring out if they’re still crucial to each other or if they’d be better off realizing their differences and taking separate paths. The story is about exploring male friendship, and it does it well.

In the end, 22 Jump Street is hilarious. Never has a movie that’s been this meta been this great, and it’s the funniest comedy of the past few years. The laughs are consistent, and some of them are huge. Most summer blockbusters demand to be seen on the big screen for the spectacle of it, but 22 Jump Street deserves the same ticket price for the experience of it. This is one you’ll want to experience in a packed, laughing theater.

Louie Schuth, hypable.com





9:15pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

Wednesday July 30, 2014

1:00pm

Movies for Mommies

22 Jump Street

2014, USA, 112 MINS, 14A

Dir: Phil Lord, Christopher Miller
Starring: Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum

College comedies are a genre themselves and 22 Jump Street is a good one. It completely embraces all the college antics it’s allowed to explore this time around. What the movie is really “about” (besides being about itself) is the bond between Hill and Tatum’s Schmidt and Jenko. Like 21 Jump Street, this is a movie about their partnership and figuring out if they’re still crucial to each other or if they’d be better off realizing their differences and taking separate paths. The story is about exploring male friendship, and it does it well.

In the end, 22 Jump Street is hilarious. Never has a movie that’s been this meta been this great, and it’s the funniest comedy of the past few years. The laughs are consistent, and some of them are huge. Most summer blockbusters demand to be seen on the big screen for the spectacle of it, but 22 Jump Street deserves the same ticket price for the experience of it. This is one you’ll want to experience in a packed, laughing theater.

Louie Schuth, hypable.com





7:00pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

9:15pm

The Immigrant

2014, USA, 118 MINS, 14A

Dir: James Gray
Starring: Marion Cotillard, Joaquin Phoenix, Jeremy Renner

In American popular culture, and in the private lore of millions of American families, the immigrant experience of the late-19th and early 20th centuries is often presented as a chronicle of struggle and triumph, a parable of dreams come true. In “The Immigrant,” James Gray tries to push through this rosy nostalgia and recapture some of the terror and strangeness of the journey from the Old World to the New. The first shot is of the Statue of Liberty shrouded in harbor mist, and the film unfolds in the gap between the promise that lady embodies and the harsh realities a newcomer encounters once she gets off the boat.

The newcomer is Ewa Cybulska, a Polish Catholic who has crossed the ocean in 1921 with her sister, in flight from war and deprivation. She is played by Marion Cotillard with a luminous intensity — at once dignified and utterly vulnerable — that brings to mind the stars of silent film. And while “The Immigrant” has dialogue (in several languages) and was shot in color, it feels almost like a lost artifact of the era it depicts. The film is earnestly and unabashedly melodramatic to an extent that may baffle audiences accustomed to clever, knowing historical fictions. But it also has a depth and purity of feeling that makes other movies feel timid and small by comparison. The New York Times,  A.O. Scott



Thursday July 31, 2014

7:00pm

The Immigrant

2014, USA, 118 MINS, 14A

Dir: James Gray
Starring: Marion Cotillard, Joaquin Phoenix, Jeremy Renner

In American popular culture, and in the private lore of millions of American families, the immigrant experience of the late-19th and early 20th centuries is often presented as a chronicle of struggle and triumph, a parable of dreams come true. In “The Immigrant,” James Gray tries to push through this rosy nostalgia and recapture some of the terror and strangeness of the journey from the Old World to the New. The first shot is of the Statue of Liberty shrouded in harbor mist, and the film unfolds in the gap between the promise that lady embodies and the harsh realities a newcomer encounters once she gets off the boat.

The newcomer is Ewa Cybulska, a Polish Catholic who has crossed the ocean in 1921 with her sister, in flight from war and deprivation. She is played by Marion Cotillard with a luminous intensity — at once dignified and utterly vulnerable — that brings to mind the stars of silent film. And while “The Immigrant” has dialogue (in several languages) and was shot in color, it feels almost like a lost artifact of the era it depicts. The film is earnestly and unabashedly melodramatic to an extent that may baffle audiences accustomed to clever, knowing historical fictions. But it also has a depth and purity of feeling that makes other movies feel timid and small by comparison. The New York Times,  A.O. Scott



9:15pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

July 2014

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